Dating Sites That Accept Bitcoin - 250+ Places That Accept ...

Litecoin

For discussion about Litecoin, the leading cryptocurrency derived from Bitcoin. Litecoin is developed with a focus on speed, efficiency, and wider initial coin distribution through the use of scrypt-based mining.
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What places accept BitCoin? /r/Bitcoin

What places accept BitCoin? /Bitcoin submitted by coincrazyy to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Pizza day is coming, where can one buy a Pizza for sats?

May 22nd is The pizza day. I want to celebrate by ordering pizza, but I wanna know what places accept bitcoin for pizza! Anyone know good sites?
submitted by Elum224 to BitcoinUK [link] [comments]

“Libra will need to be accepted in many places for those who want to *USE* it. People need to have confidence that they can *USE* Libra” - Even FB gets what the Bitcoin Core dev don’t. Thanks for ruining our first-mover advantage.

“Libra will need to be accepted in many places for those who want to *USE* it. People need to have confidence that they can *USE* Libra” - Even FB gets what the Bitcoin Core dev don’t. Thanks for ruining our first-mover advantage. submitted by BitttBurger to btc [link] [comments]

Community Opinion - What do you wish you could spend Bitcoin on thats not currently accepting Bitcoin or hard to find places that accept it? /r/btc

Community Opinion - What do you wish you could spend Bitcoin on thats not currently accepting Bitcoin or hard to find places that accept it? /btc submitted by ABitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

What can we do to start getting Bitcoin Cash accepted in poor places, such as Africa ?

submitted by thepaip to btc [link] [comments]

What places in Vancouver accept Bitcoin as payment?

Hey everyone, I am putting together a comprehensive list of businesses that accept bitcoin as payment here in Vancouver. I get paid in BTC for my salary so I just wanted to share this knowledge with people who are interested in using this new currency to pay for their goods and services. If you have knowledge of any companies who accept BTC then feel free to chime in. I will update my post as suggestions come in. Also, if you are a local business looking to accept BTC as payment then shoot me a PM and I can send you in the right direction to get started. The more the merrier.
Coffee: Waves Coffee House (Commercial Drive and Howe Street)
Food/Drink: Bestie (105 E Pender Street) India Gate Indian Cuisine (616 Robson st) Rogue Bistro (91 W 2nd Ave) The Cobalt (917 Main st) (Potentially stopped accepting BTC) Steamrollers (1195 Robson st)
Grocery: ​Yummy Yards (7200 Steveston Hwy, Richmond BC)
Health/Wellness: Krystal Fit Studio (1591 W 6th ave) Float House Kush Cup HQ (644 Kingsway St)
Services: No Limit Landscaping Your Local Movers
submitted by MattVanbex to vancouver [link] [comments]

Even as interest in bitcoin grows, the number of real-world places that accept it is dissapointingly low. What can we do about it?

submitted by matthew412 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

If you could choose one place/shop to accept Bitcoin what would it be?

submitted by BitcoinSeedstore to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Store accepting bitcoin, whats the best places to list it?

I have a store at http://www.lune.us/opencart it may need some work we currently sell mostly ebay/amazon but i did implement bitcoin and it seems to work. I've been telling people (trying to convince them its worth adding) man you can get all this free advertisement supporting bitcoin and there are people out there who will only spent BTC etc.
Nobody ever listens,anyway, i set it up on mine. Is there a good central location of bitcoin accepting stores? Right now we specialize in high alkaloid content poppy seeds but have other plans.
submitted by radio879 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Visiting in Vienna in two weeks! What are some places that accept Bitcoin?

Guten Tag! (unfortunately that's about as much German as I know)
I'm travelling to Vienna in two weeks to visit with some family and I'd like to use Bitcoin as often as possible while I'm there. What are some good places that I might be able to spend some Bitcoin at?
Thanks!
submitted by -cause to BitcoinAT [link] [comments]

I just decided to start accepting Bitcoin in NYC, what is the best place(s) to announce this for others to see

I don't know of any other dental offices that accept bit coin, but I'm sure there is a group of people out there that want to use them up at as many places as possible. Any suggestions of sites (local to NYC or otherwise) that I can get listed onto? Thanks for everyone's help in advance.
submitted by Djanash to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: What places in Vancouver accept Bitcoin as payment? /r/vancouver

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: What places in Vancouver accept Bitcoin as payment? /vancouver submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

What can we do to start getting Bitcoin Cash accepted in poor places, such as Africa ? /r/btc

What can we do to start getting Bitcoin Cash accepted in poor places, such as Africa ? /btc submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

What if the reddit community worked together to sign up merchants? Cricket seems to need a merchant that accepts bitcoin. Let's let this place know that we'd buy from them, if they accepted bitcoin.

What if the reddit community worked together to sign up merchants? Cricket seems to need a merchant that accepts bitcoin. Let's let this place know that we'd buy from them, if they accepted bitcoin. submitted by SignEmUp to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

The burrito place I went in today had one of those fancy "all types of payment accepted" terminals and I asked if he took bitcoin. He didn't know what it was, but then seemed interested. Does anyone have a leaflet I can give him tomorrow?

I'm not much of an evangelist, but when he asked "what's that?" I said it's a way to pay for stuff (like paypal is) but without the fees, and he seemed interested and said he'd check it out.
Obviously there's loads to it, but does anyone have a simple leaflet I can print and give to him tomorrow?
submitted by AgrajagPrime to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

What if the reddit community worked together to sign up merchants? Cricket seems to need a merchant that accepts bitcoin. Let's let this place know that we'd buy from them, if they accepted bitcoin.

What if the reddit community worked together to sign up merchants? Cricket seems to need a merchant that accepts bitcoin. Let's let this place know that we'd buy from them, if they accepted bitcoin. submitted by monsiurlemming to Stuff [link] [comments]

What is the best way to sell/exchange bitcoin for Paypal or some sort of virtual prepaid credit card that I can use online for purchases at places where bitcoin isn't accepted? /r/Bitcoin

What is the best way to sell/exchange bitcoin for Paypal or some sort of virtual prepaid credit card that I can use online for purchases at places where bitcoin isn't accepted? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Store accepting bitcoin, whats the best places to list it? /r/Bitcoin

Store accepting bitcoin, whats the best places to list it? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Please forgive me if this is the wrong place to ask: What is the simplest way to purchase and send $10 worth of bitcoin to a site that accepts them. Specifics in comments.

I am trying to donate $10 to the following website, which asks for funds in bitcoin: http://www.usenet-crawler.com/content/4/bff/
I would like to do this without creating several accounts with wallet sites, exchangers, and all the other intimidating stuff.
Could somebody do me the favor of taking a quick look at this and telling me the easiest way to proceed?
THANKS!
submitted by Andre_Gigante to Bitcoinforum [link] [comments]

The burrito place I went in today had one of those fancy "all types of payment accepted" terminals and I asked if he took bitcoin. He didn't know what it was, but then seemed interested. Does anyone have a leaflet I can give him tomorrow? /r/Bitcoin

The burrito place I went in today had one of those fancy submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

The principles I learned in 7 years here

I've learned a lot by surfing these subs. I internalized it and am really happy with where I am. I wanted to take a minute to pay it forward and distill what I've internalized into first principles.
First, a bit on my background. I was always interested in being FI and know that money doesn't equal freedom, but it is an aspect of freedom (if nothing else, freedom from worrying about meeting basic needs). I was saving heavily in my mid 20's but was also working for a nonprofit. I was saving 50% of my income but it honestly wasn't amounting to all that much.
I wound up spending about a year teaching myself data science before and after work. I was really motivated by the field and, luckily for me, it turns out to be quite lucrative. I also started skydiving. That meant moving to a shared 1 bedroom apartment with somebody I butted heads with so I could afford it and not overly sacrifice savings goals. That was a tough call because skydiving is expensive, but it also made me much more risk tolerant and a generally happier and less reactive human. Skydiving taught me that most of my fears were unfounded (evolution predisposes you to fear more than you have to) so I geared up for a big life change.
When I was good enough at data science, I quit my job in the nonprofit and moved to San Francisco to do a 3 month bootcamp program. Everybody thought I was nuts. That drained my savings virtually down to the last dime (with no debt though). I got my first job in the industry making very little money in a role where I would learn a lot. I loved it and got a promotion in (I shit you not) 2 weeks of being on the job. That was my first 6 figure income.
Zoom forward four years and I'm at a major company with a significant equity stake, financially comfortable, and having just bought a home. Not quite yet FIRE but getting close depending on how my company stock does.
Obviously everybody's path is different. But principles are more universal. With all that, here are the main principles that lead to my success:
  1. Find the global maximum. I was top of my game in that nonprofit with a relatively good income and title, but I was growing unhappy and knew I wouldn't make my longterm goals. It was a tough call to quit, drain my savings, and move. But I did it and now I feel like I'm in a global personal maximum for life satisfaction, earning, etc. This means longterm thinking
  2. Stay balanced. I almost burned myself out on FIRE multiple times. I started seeing everything as costs. Be scrappy on everything but what makes you most come alive. That's crucial for longterm motivation
  3. The best investments are always in yourself. Active recovery, eduction, socializing, etc. are the best investments you can make. They're bad investments on the short term but great on the longterm
  4. Save on housing until you're ready to purchase a home. My rule was that I'd live with roommates until I had enough for a down payment. When covid happened, I decided I wouldn't buy a place until the market rebounded so I let my investments sit until they rebounded, sold, and purchased a home. Most people lose too much money on housing
  5. Never pay interest. This is an exaggeration but it's the biggest lifetime expense for more people. I pay some interest but both my small car loan and mortgage are below 3% interest. That means, with inflation, my money is likely better in the stock market than paying back those loans. So apart from that interest, I've been lucky enough to manage to avoid it like the plague
  6. Take risks and experiment. Most people are way too risk adverse, scared to place strategic bets. I've lost a lot of money on risky things but have gained so much more in experience. Spending thousands on bitcoin miners in the early days while on a shoestring budget? Lost a lot on that. But it resulted in learning an appropriate way to buy crypto and the net effect was many more thousands of dollars in gains
  7. Have mentors/models. If you don't do this explicitly, you default to modeling your behavior on whoever is around you. Think of who your top models for behavior are (financial, relationship, etc) and figure out what makes them tick. For me it was Mr. Money Moustache, some abundance-oriented technology thought leaders, and some anti-consumer friends who were militant about how owning things doesn't make you happy
  8. Don't defer pleasure. I came to realize that many of my thoughts on retirement were quite Catholic (thanks, dad). In other words, I was deferring pleasure until retirement like my Catholic father was deferring pleasure until the afterlife. Be fiercely present and enjoy today. Finances are only one part of life satisfaction
  9. Have an abundance and growth mindset. Most people think of money as a scarce resource. It's not. Anybody can generate it given enough time and effort. Think big picture and work incrementally towards it rather than accepting the career progression of your peers or employer. Most people underestimate how much employers will recognize a strong sense of drive and personal responsibility
  10. Change is necessary. For the Buddhists, that's the source of all suffering. Do we want to sacrifice the mediocre reality today for the option of a better reality tomorrow? Most people are so change and uncertainty adverse they can't adapt to more beneficial situations. Being open and curious and optimistic about change is necessary, otherwise the mediocre today seems like a better bet or you'll change and then quickly regress. The opportunity cost for change is whatever situation you currently find yourself in. Make sure you're ok with this and have the confidence to course correct if you get in over your head
TL;DR - Reality is malleable. You can achieve whatever you want as long as you take a step back, strategize, and then kick some ass. If you adopt some principles and play the long game, you'll ace this whole life thing
Edit: Glad this got so much attention. I feel like I've paid forward the mindset and benefits this sub helped me create. Thanks for being part of that!
submitted by Liquid_Subject to financialindependence [link] [comments]

Putting $400M of Bitcoin on your company balance sheet

Also posted on my blog as usual. Read it there if you can, there are footnotes and inlined plots.
A couple of months ago, MicroStrategy (MSTR) had a spare $400M of cash which it decided to shift to Bitcoin (BTC).
Today we'll discuss in excrutiating detail why this is not a good idea.
When a company has a pile of spare money it doesn't know what to do with, it'll normally do buybacks or start paying dividends. That gives the money back to the shareholders, and from an economic perspective the money can get better invested in other more promising companies. If you have a huge pile of of cash, you probably should be doing other things than leave it in a bank account to gather dust.
However, this statement from MicroStrategy CEO Michael Saylor exists to make it clear he's buying into BTC for all the wrong reasons:
“This is not a speculation, nor is it a hedge. This was a deliberate corporate strategy to adopt a bitcoin standard.”
Let's unpack it and jump into the economics Bitcoin:

Is Bitcoin money?

No.
Or rather BTC doesn't act as money and there's no serious future path for BTC to become a form of money. Let's go back to basics. There are 3 main economic problems money solves:
1. Medium of Exchange. Before money we had to barter, which led to the double coincidence of wants problem. When everyone accepts the same money you can buy something from someone even if they don't like the stuff you own.
As a medium of exchange, BTC is not good. There are significant transaction fees and transaction waiting times built-in to BTC and these worsen the more popular BTC get.
You can test BTC's usefulness as a medium of exchange for yourself right now: try to order a pizza or to buy a random item with BTC. How many additional hurdles do you have to go through? How many fewer options do you have than if you used a regular currency? How much overhead (time, fees) is there?
2. Unit of Account. A unit of account is what you compare the value of objects against. We denominate BTC in terms of how many USD they're worth, so BTC is a unit of account presently. We can say it's because of lack of adoption, but really it's also because the market value of BTC is so volatile.
If I buy a $1000 table today or in 2017, it's roughly a $1000 table. We can't say that a 0.4BTC table was a 0.4BTC table in 2017. We'll expand on this in the next point:
3. Store of Value. When you create economic value, you don't want to be forced to use up the value you created right away.
For instance, if I fix your washing machine and you pay me in avocados, I'd be annoyed. I'd have to consume my payment before it becomes brown, squishy and disgusting. Avocado fruit is not good money because avocadoes loses value very fast.
On the other hand, well-run currencies like the USD, GBP, CAD, EUR, etc. all lose their value at a low and most importantly fairly predictible rate. Let's look at the chart of the USD against BTC
While the dollar loses value at a predictible rate, BTC is all over the place, which is bad.
One important use money is to write loan contracts. Loans are great. They let people spend now against their future potential earnings, so they can buy houses or start businesses without first saving up for a decade. Loans are good for the economy.
If you want to sign something that says "I owe you this much for that much time" then you need to be able to roughly predict the value of the debt in at the point in time where it's due.
Otherwise you'll have a hard time pricing the risk of the loan effectively. This means that you need to charge higher interests. The risk of making a loan in BTC needs to be priced into the interest of a BTC-denominated loan, which means much higher interest rates. High interests on loans are bad, because buying houses and starting businesses are good things.

BTC has a fixed supply, so these problems are built in

Some people think that going back to a standard where our money was denominated by a stock of gold (the Gold Standard) would solve economic problems. This is nonsense.
Having control over supply of your currency is a good thing, as long as it's well run.
See here
Remember that what is desirable is low variance in the value, not the value itself. When there are wild fluctuations in value, it's hard for money to do its job well.
Since the 1970s, the USD has been a fiat money with no intrinsic value. This means we control the supply of money.
Let's look at a classic poorly drawn econ101 graph
The market price for USD is where supply meets demand. The problem with a currency based on an item whose supply is fixed is that the price will necessarily fluctuate in response to changes in demand.
Imagine, if you will, that a pandemic strikes and that the demand for currency takes a sharp drop. The US imports less, people don't buy anything anymore, etc. If you can't print money, you get deflation, which is worsens everything. On the other hand, if you can make the money printers go brrrr you can stabilize the price
Having your currency be based on a fixed supply isn't just bad because in/deflation is hard to control.
It's also a national security risk...
The story of the guy who crashed gold prices in North Africa
In the 1200s, Mansa Munsa, the emperor of the Mali, was rich and a devout Muslim and wanted everyone to know it. So he embarked on a pilgrimage to make it rain all the way to Mecca.
He in fact made it rain so hard he increased the overall supply of gold and unintentionally crashed gold prices in Cairo by 20%, wreaking an economic havoc in North Africa that lasted a decade.
This story is fun, the larger point that having your inflation be at the mercy of foreign nations is an undesirable attribute in any currency. The US likes to call some countries currency manipulators, but this problem would be serious under a gold standard.

Currencies are based on trust

Since the USD is based on nothing except the US government's word, how can we trust USD not to be mismanaged?
The answer is that you can probably trust the fed until political stooges get put in place. Currently, the US's central bank managing the USD, the Federal Reserve (the Fed for friends & family), has administrative authority. The fed can say "no" to dumb requests from the president.
People who have no idea what the fed does like to chant "audit the fed", but the fed is already one of the best audited US federal entities. The transcripts of all their meetings are out in the open. As is their balance sheet, what they plan to do and why. If the US should audit anything it's the Department of Defense which operates without any accounting at all.
It's easy to see when a central bank will go rogue: it's when political yes-men are elected to the board.
For example, before printing themselves into hyperinflation, the Venezuelan president appointed a sociologist who publicly stated “Inflation does not exist in real life” and instead is a made up capitalist lie. Note what happened mere months after his gaining control over the Venezuelan currency
This is a key policy. One paper I really like, Sargent (1984) "The end of 4 big inflations" states:
The essential measures that ended hyperinflation in each of Germany,Austria, Hungary, and Poland were, first, the creation of an independentcentral bank that was legally committed to refuse the government'sdemand or additional unsecured credit and, second, a simultaneousalteration in the fiscal policy regime.
In english: *hyperinflation stops when the central bank can say "no" to the government."
The US Fed, like other well good central banks, is run by a bunch of nerds. When it prints money, even as aggressively as it has it does so for good reasons. You can see why they started printing on March 15th as the COVID lockdowns started:
The Federal Reserve is prepared to use its full range of tools to support the flow of credit to households and businesses and thereby promote its maximum employment and price stability goals.
In english: We're going to keep printing and lowering rates until jobs are back and inflation is under control. If we print until the sun is blotted out, we'll print in the shade.

BTC is not gold

Gold is a good asset for doomsday-preppers. If society crashes, gold will still have value.
How do we know that?
Gold has held value throughout multiple historic catastrophes over thousands of years. It had value before and after the Bronze Age Collapse, the Fall of the Western Roman Empire and Gengis Khan being Gengis Khan.
Even if you erased humanity and started over, the new humans would still find gold to be economically valuable. When Europeans d̶i̶s̶c̶o̶v̶e̶r̶e̶d̶ c̶o̶n̶q̶u̶e̶r̶e̶d̶ g̶e̶n̶o̶c̶i̶d̶e̶d̶ went to America, they found gold to be an important item over there too. This is about equivalent to finding humans on Alpha-Centauri and learning that they think gold is a good store of value as well.
Some people are puzzled at this: we don't even use gold for much! But it has great properties:
First, gold is hard to fake and impossible to manufacture. This makes it good to ascertain payment.
Second, gold doesnt react to oxygen, so it doesn't rust or tarnish. So it keeps value over time unlike most other materials.
Last, gold is pretty. This might sound frivolous, and you may not like it, but jewelry has actual value to humans.
It's no coincidence if you look at a list of the wealthiest families, a large number of them trade in luxury goods.
To paraphrase Veblen humans have a profound desire to signal social status, for the same reason peacocks have unwieldy tails. Gold is a great way to achieve that.
On the other hand, BTC lacks all these attributes. Its value is largely based on common perception of value. There are a few fundamental drivers of demand:
Apart from these, it's hard to argue that BTC will retain value throughout some sort of economic catastrophe.

BTC is really risky

One last statement from Michael Saylor I take offense to is this:
“We feel pretty confident that Bitcoin is less risky than holding cash, less risky than holding gold,” MicroStrategy CEO said in an interview
"BTC is less risky than holding cash or gold long term" is nonsense. We saw before that BTC is more volatile on face value, and that as long as the Fed isn't run by spider monkeys stacked in a trench coat, the inflation is likely to be within reasonable bounds.
But on top of this, BTC has Abrupt downside risks that normal currencies don't. Let's imagine a few:

Blockchain solutions are fundamentally inefficient

Blockchain was a genius idea. I still marvel at the initial white paper which is a great mix of economics and computer science.
That said, blockchain solutions make large tradeoffs in design because they assume almost no trust between parties. This leads to intentionally wasteful designs on a massive scale.
The main problem is that all transactions have to be validated by expensive computational operations and double checked by multiple parties. This means waste:
Many design problems can be mitigated by various improvements over BTC, but it remains that a simple database always works better than a blockchain if you can trust the parties to the transaction.
submitted by VodkaHaze to badeconomics [link] [comments]

How To Accept Bitcoin on Shopify What Companies Accept Bitcoin? Bitpages.co Testimonial Inside a Bitcoin mine that earns $70K a day - YouTube Top 10 Companies That Accept Bitcoin Bitcoin Bazaar - Buy, Sell and Accept Bitcoins in India

Unfortunately, Bitcoin payment is currently only accepted for hotel bookings. eGifter. eGifter is an online service that allows you to use your hard-earned Bitcoins to purchase gift cards from places that don’t directly accept Bitcoins, such as Amazon, JCPenny, Sephora, Home Depot, Kohl’s and many others. Just like Expedia and Overstock ... Places That Accept Bitcoin in UK. Bitcoin payment is supported in many establishments in the UK, both physical stores and online. These including music and video games stores, web hosting and domains companies, gift card suppliers, books, sports and recreational services, schools, clothing stores, office space, computer components, data backup service providers, electronic shops, etc. The ... Although Wikileaks isn’t a company, it does deserve to be on this list of places that accept Bitcoin. WikiLeaks is a global non-profit organization that enables anonymous sources to publish secrets the humanity should know about. As with most non-profit organizations, WikiLeaks is almost entirely supported by donations. Unfortunately, it didn’t take long for PayPal and all major credit ... The list of places that accept Bitcoin may surprise you. Expedia. Expedia, an online travel booking agency, has partnered with Coinbase to provide you with a Bitcoin payment option when booking trips. Overstock. Overstock was one of the first online retailers to accept Bitcoin payments and has consistently been supportive of new cryptocurrencies. In a partnership with ShapeShift, the company ... The world's largest directory of bitcoin accepting businesses, with ratings and reviews - this is your one stop place to find where to spend bitcoins.

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How To Accept Bitcoin on Shopify

Bitcoin Accepted here!!! ;) Bitcoin Bazaar Starring Aman Kalra & Madhav #Bitcoin #Coinsecure. Bitcoin is a currency at heart. This only stays true only as long as it is being used as one. So, here are the top five places you can spend your Bitcoin. Subscribe to Cointelegraph: https://goo ... The virtual goldrush to mine Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies leads us to Central Washington state where a Bitcoin mine generates roughly $70,000 a day min... You can actually find bitcoin merchant companies who are willing to accept this form of payment. Bitcoin Vancouver has actually become quite the popular idea for many residents and merchants alike ... What are the safest practices for accepting bitcoin at my business? Why is it important to maintain custody and use open-source solutions? Is it possible to accept donations via Lightning?

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