software installation - How do I install a .deb file via ...

[IDEA] [PROPOSAL] Monero Debian (deb) packages / Debian package repository deb.getmonero.org (I can do)

I have the skills to implement this if wanted.
Possible User Experience
This is a proposal, i.e. not implemented yet. Instructions for users, simplified.
How to install monero using apt-get
Download the repository signing key.
wget https://www.getmonero.org/monero.asc
Add the signing key.
sudo apt-key --keyring /etc/apt/trusted.gpg.d/monero.gpg add ~/monero.asc
Add APT repository.
echo "deb https://deb.getmonero.org buster main" | sudo tee /etc/apt/sources.list.d/monero.list
Update your package lists.
sudo apt-get update
Install monero.
sudo apt-get install monero
A few technical implementation details
I would simply grab the binaries provided by getmonero.org, download them, check software (gpg) signatures, put these into deb packages, add these to a repository, and upload the repository.
What I would not do is creating the binaries during package creation. While this is nice to have, it doesn't help user experience and blocks the progress on reaching this goal. See next chapter.
Why simply put the pre-build Monero binaries into a deb package?
1) After bitcoin existing for more than 10 years, being popular and being in Debian unstable (sid) it still never made its way into Debian testing, let alone stable. Reason being explained that a difference in underlying libraries (even just security fixes) during compilation may result in a network split. Binaries compiled during packaging on different versions of Linux distributions might have different libraries that might cause a network fork / chain split.
References:
(Note: above website saying Tags: fixed-upstream is probably a mistake as discussion at bottom says.)
2) The github issue of packaging monero stalled.
3) By shipping the same binaries as provided by getmonero.org reduces the chances of introducing a backdoor.
Many Options
Timeline
Doable quickly. The electrum (bitcoin) AppImage was recently added to a Debian package (binaries-freedom) by me and is now easily installable in Whonix. Pre-installed in testers version of Whonix already.
About Me
I am the founder of Whonix, which I am maintaining at present for more than 7 years.
Whonix (formerly TorBOX) is a Debian GNU/Linux–based security-focused Linux distribution. It aims to provide privacy, security and anonymity on the internet.
You can see an overview of packages I am maintaining on my github profile.
To proof that this forum account adrelanos corresponds the same person maintaining whonix.org, it is added here.
Questions
What happened to, what is the successor of the forum funding system?
submitted by adrelanos to Monero [link] [comments]

Leaving Ubuntu because of snap ...

I am moving back to Debian here user rights matters and nobody want to fix already fixed things. I tried to install VLC and Bitcoin core. Both hanged during install and needed to kill download process from console because there is no GUI for it - imagine this in synaptic or whatever - had no problem for many years. Then VLC could't access my second drive mounted in mnt folder ... it looks like besides normal user level rights now you have application rights ... common this is joke - ok you can add permissions to VLC. Now best part. I have bitcoin wallet on external drive and what - you cannot add permissions to snap bitcoin core to access storage devices as snap packages need to have ability to receive those rights ... installed DEB from SID - next week bye bye ubuntu.
submitted by mrkaczor to Ubuntu [link] [comments]

Let's build an army of Ethereum nodes!

Hi everyone!
I ran into Ethereum several months ago while reading about bitcoin and the blockchain and was quite impressed by some videos explaining the project (most of them by Vitalik himself). During this time I've tried to educate myself on this breakthrough technology. And at this point, I'd like to get a little more involved. I think that one easy way to contribute to this fascinating project is by running a full Ethereum node, so let me share some stuff of my experience of setting up an Ethereum node on Raspberry Pi 3.
While doing some research about the best Ethereum client for my raspberry Pi 3 I realized that pretty much there are no ARM nodes on the network (according to ethernodes.org). Shouldn't be precisely the opposite? ARM devices such as Raspberry Pi have a good performance, are cheap and power-efficient.
I looked into "EthEmbedded" [1] (great project, by the way) but it is mainly focused on Geth and Eth clients and you need to run the Ethereum clients manually. It's built on top of Ubuntu mate (and we need to keep things light). Besides, I was looking something more Flash & Play :-).
So, I compiled Parity from source on my raspberry Pi 3 (which is the most efficient Ethereum client out there [2]) and gave it a try. I was really surprised with the overall performance and thought that it would be great to get an Ethereum node up and running easiest way possible.
So, I built a custom Raspbian image which runs Parity as a boot up service and starts syncing the blockchain with no user interaction. This is what I got so far:
A custom [3] Raspbian [4] image with Ethcore Parity 1.3 [5] integrated. The image is generated using pi-gen [6] (plus a couple of files for Parity installation)
Some remarks:
Final thoughts:
I think there are several reasons to try to increase Ethereum ARM nodes in the coming months:
You can download the Custom Raspbian Image here:
http://www.ethraspbian.com/downloads/2016-09-09-ethraspbian.img.zip
For further installation instructions please visit:
https://github.com/diglos/pi-gen
Let me know your comments.
Let's do this. Mine is up and running :-)
TL;DR: If you want to contribute to the Ethereum network, get a Raspberry pi 3, install the OS image into your microSD card, connect the ethernet cable and power on your device. This is it, flash and play :-), you are already running an Ethereum node!
submitted by diglos76 to ethereum [link] [comments]

Atomic Wallet: A light wallet solution for crypto assets

Atomic Wallet: A light wallet solution for crypto assets
Cryptocurrencies as well all know is gradually innovating our financial sector today, with the invent of Bitcoin in 2009. Bitcoin is one of the most popular cryptocurrencies in the world, and is gradually being accepted by various individuals, businesses, firms, along side others. Cryptocurrency exchanges are online platforms where one can exchange one cryptocurrency for another cryptocurrency or sometimes for Fiat currency. Centralized exchanges are online cryptocurrency platform that makes use of a third party or middle man to execute transactions no matter the asset that may be in place. Centralized exchanges also come with high transaction charges, poor security and poor support services This centralization feature has created severe obstacles for the development of Blockchain-based markets.Atomic wallet platform believes the main soluiton to the aforementioned problems is creating a decentralized platform for these digital assets. Atomic wallet platform provides custody-free, transparent, immutable cryptocurrency trading.

https://preview.redd.it/lfdywna1sx021.png?width=776&format=png&auto=webp&s=d40ecef1919f261e8be5753937f802d484f2e761

WHY ATOMIC WALLET?
Atomic wallet is a decentralized multi-currency platform that provides a powerful, in-demand service that allows users to reduce effort spent on managing crypto assets and makes it transparent and reliable. Atomic wallet platform is not just a wallet but also has a cross-chai Atomic swap exchange and a decentralized order book.
KEY FEATURES OF ATOMIC WALLET
ASSET MANAGEMENT: Atomic Wallet provides a powerful, in-demand service that allows users to reduce effort spent on managing crypto assets and makes it transparent and reliable. The asset management wallet functionality is built on the Simplified Payment Verification technology (SPV), which makes it possible for users to perform tasks such as;
  • Receive crypto assets to the generated wallet.
  • Import assets to the wallet using private keys of various formats.
  • Store private keys in a securely encrypted environment.
  • Send assets to other addresses.
  • Select cryptocurrency node to use.
  • Select blockchain explorer to use.
ATOMIC SDKAtomic SDK will support following functions:
  • Create order and deploy it to the DOB.
  • Confirm order execution.
  • Receive order execution status.
  • Get list of available orders from the orderbook.
https://preview.redd.it/qi8caircqx021.png?width=898&format=png&auto=webp&s=13b0868be7a6d442a36a38d92d5838b4e21a3507
ATOMIC SWAPS: The Atomic Swaps is a cross-chain exchange feature that makes it possible for users to exchange cryptocurrencies between each other without third-party interference.
DISTRIBUTED ORDERBOOK (DOB): Order book is an electronic list of buy-and-sell orders of specific security or financial instruments, organized by price level. Atomic distrivuted order book (DOB) is based on a BitTorrent protocol. BitTorrent is one of the most common communication protocols for peer-to-peer file sharing (“P2P”) and can transferring of large files, such as digital video files containing TV shows or video clips or digital audio files containing songs.
TRADES HISTORY BLOCKCHAIN STORAGE: The Atomic wallet platform is designed to use a custom-built Byzantine consensus algorithm that keeps DOB historical data safe without needing to mine blocks. This feature also makes it near impossible for a bad actor to add incorrect data or change the history in Atomic Wallet Blockchain.

https://preview.redd.it/k0ydstxdqx021.png?width=929&format=png&auto=webp&s=3eccbabfaeb69b01863a0f8fa3f602ef3da477b7
ADDITIONAL FEATURES
SHAPESHIFT: The Atomic wallet community voted shapeshift as a default option for instant exchanges. ShapeShift is the fastest and most convenient way to swap digital currencies, with the exchange rate always remaining competitive.
CHANGELLY: Changelly is a popular cryptocurrency exchange that has been in operation since 2015 with over 1.5 million registered users . Changelly acts as a mediator between trading cryptocurrency platform and users providing over 90 altcoins at the best market rates for a seamless exchange.
FIAT OPTIONS : Atomic will not process fiat operations himself following “do not touch fiat” policy. Fiat options to be provided to the customers in cooperation with partner services.
ATOMIC WALLET DOWNLOADS
Atomic Wallet is available for all major Operating Systems. Click to Start downloading.
WINDOWS: https://download.atomicwallet.io/atomicwallet.exeMAC: https://download.atomicwallet.io/atomicwallet.dmgUBUNTU: https://download.atomicwallet.io/atomicwallet.AppImageDEBIAN: https://download.atomicwallet.io/atomicwallet.debFEDORA: https://download.atomicwallet.io/atomicwallet.rpmMOBILE
DEVICES (IOS and Android): The team is working hard on the mobile app right now. Some Mobile App screenshots

https://preview.redd.it/j3oqmt6uly021.jpg?width=1087&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=cfb0e10f994db17edf1900e7696345d0ca5f2c51

EARN ADDITIONAL AWC TOKENS
Download and install Atomic wallet to your desired device. After the process of verification you will receive an email with the promo code. Share it on your social networks. When other users install Atomic Wallet App and verify their emails — you will receive 25 extra AWC tokens for each installation.
CONCLUSION
Conclusively, Atomic wallet is a Multi-asset Wallet with cross-chain Atomic Swap exchange and decentralized orderbook that supports so many crypto coins and tokens such as; BTC, ETH, DCR, LTC and 300+ ERC20 tokens., as well managing user’s crypto porfolio in a single smooth interface.
LINKS
Website
White Paper
Telegram:
Twitter
Facebook
____________________
The article is written by artur2403
submitted by artkld39 to cryptocurrencynewico [link] [comments]

WHY YOU SHOULD CHOOSE ATOMIC WALLET

WHY YOU SHOULD CHOOSE ATOMIC WALLET
https://preview.redd.it/wg5ze4mdxjm21.png?width=800&format=png&auto=webp&s=2e2ff0648168251aded8619d0d2da82ab572293f
PREFACE
Bitcoin is the first ever cryptocurrency and became popular in 2009. After the invent of bitcoin came thousands of other cryptocurrencies which can be termed as Alternate coins (Altcoins) such as; Bitcoin cash (BCH), Ethereum (ETH), DASH, along side with others. Cryptocurrency exchanges are online platforms where one can exchange one cryptocurrency for another cryptocurrency or sometimes for Fiat currency. Centralized exchanges are online cryptocurrency platform that makes use of a third party or middle man to execute transactions no matter the asset that may be in place. Centralized exchanges come with high transaction charges and vulnerable security. This centralization feature has created severe obstacles for the development of Blockchain-based markets.

Atomic wallet is a platform which believes decntralization can solve these problems. Blockchains are designed to be immutable and decentralized. Atomic Wallet team believes products designed for cryptocurrency assets should be immutable and decentralized as well.

https://preview.redd.it/dwhl8srgxjm21.png?width=1722&format=png&auto=webp&s=35f64f911c6b53f42dd6c93cc67796f555441079
ABOUT ATOMIC WALLET
Atomic wallet is a decentralized multi-currency platform that provides a powerful, in-demand service that allows users to reduce effort spent on managing crypto assets and makes it transparent and reliable. Atomic wallet platform is not just a wallet but also has a cross-chai Atomic swap exchange and a decentralized order book.
OUTSTANDING FEATURES OF ATOMIC WALLET
DISTRIBUTED ORDERBOOK (DOB): Order book is an electronic list of buy-and-sell orders of specific security or financial instruments, organized by price level. Atomic distrivuted order book (DOB) is based on a BitTorrent protocol. BitTorrent is one of the most common communication protocols for peer-to-peer file sharing (“P2P”) and can transferring of large files, such as digital video files containing TV shows or video clips or digital audio files containing songs. DOB ANTI SPAM AND FRAUD PROTECTION: The Atomic wallet team will monitor every transactions carried out on the platform and they have the right to blacklist fraudulent and spamming actors from the network by blacklisting addresses or public keys by signatures. TRADES HISTORY BLOCKCHAIN STORAGE: The Atomic wallet platform is designed to use a custom-built Byzantine consensus algorithm that keeps DOB historical data safe without needing to mine blocks. This feature also makes it near impossible for a bad actor to add incorrect data or change the history in Atomic Wallet Blockchain.
ATOMIC WALLET DOWNLOADS

https://preview.redd.it/bikaqxomxjm21.png?width=1701&format=png&auto=webp&s=d5a17f0fb12204f7aa72ada65a51c6b183a240da
Atomic Wallet is available for all major Operating Systems. Click to Start downloading.
MAC: https://download.atomicwallet.io/atomicwallet.dmg UBUNTU: https://download.atomicwallet.io/atomicwallet.AppImage DEBIAN: https://download.atomicwallet.io/atomicwallet.deb FEDORA: https://download.atomicwallet.io/atomicwallet.rpm MOBILE DEVICES ANDROID: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=io.atomicwallet&referrer=utm_source%3Dwebsite
HOW TO EARN ADDITIONAL AWC TOKENS
Download and install Atomic wallet to your desired device. After the process of verification you will receive an email with the promo code. Share it on your social networks. When other users install Atomic Wallet App and verify their emails – you will receive 25 extra AWC tokens for each installation.
Rewards: 25 AWC tokens + 25 AWC for each verified referral (Unlimited)
USE PROMO CODE: QXKDF

https://preview.redd.it/1l9zm6moxjm21.jpg?width=946&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=aad64fcb94a23b88298f0664bb97ae6fa9e35e0e
ATOMIC TOKEN
Atomic wallet will issue its own token known as the Atomic wallet Coin (AWC). AWC will run on smart contracts based on the Ethereum blockchain with ERC20.
TOKEN DETAILS
Symbol: AWC Type: ERC20 Token Full name: Atomic Wallet Coin Decimals: 8 Total supply: 100,000,000 AWC Contract Address: 0xad22f63404f7305e4713ccbd4f296f34770513f4 CONCLUSION
Conclusively, Atomic wallet is a Multi-asset Wallet with cross-chain Atomic Swap exchange and decentralized orderbook that supports over 300 coins and tokens, as well managing user’s crypto porfolio in a single smooth interface.
Thank you for reading, i believe it was worth your time. Download the Atomic wallet today for better Experience
Fore more information and participation visit
Website: https://atomicwallet.io/
White Paper: https://atomicwallet.io/
Telegram: https://t.me/atomicwalletchat
Twitter: https://twitter.com/atomicwallet
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/atomicwallet
Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/atomicwallet/
Medium: https://medium.com/@atomicwallet
Address:
Atomicwallet
Estonia, Harjumaa, Tallinn, Tornimäe tn 5
Tallinn 10117
Estonia.
Author;s Details
Bitcointalk Username: noma45
Bitcointalk Url: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?action=profile;u=2025710
submitted by noma45 to FanaticsOfCryptos [link] [comments]

Tested, step-by-step tutorial to run a 21 Bitcoin Computer as a virtual machine

Many thanks to ButtcoinEE and ecafyelims for initial pointers, but if I understood correctly, both users said they hadn't actually tried it themselves. So here comes a tutorial based on something I actually tried. Best of all: You don't even need a Raspberry Pi! We'll run it as a virtual machine.
The first step is to get a Debian 8 (Jessie) installation up and running. You might want to install that inside a VMWare/Virtualbox machine. I'll be using Vagrant here ( https://www.vagrantup.com/ ) which makes it easy to manage virtual machines like that and already has a Debian 8 image in the catalog. So get Vagrant for your platform and then do something like this:
vagrant init ARTACK/debian-jessie vagrant up 
You should now be able to SSH into the machine:
vagrant ssh 
Now that we have a Debian up and running, let's first get some packages we'll need later:
sudo su # become root apt-get update apt-get upgrade apt-get install apt-transport-https git cython3 python3-setuptools 
Add the 21 Debian repository:
echo "deb https://apt.21.co stable main" > /etc/apt/sources.list.d/twentyone.list apt-get update 
It'll complain about a missing GPG key, but you can just ignore that.
We should be able to do 'apt-get install two1' now, but it complains about a missing package 'python3-sha256'. The reason for that is probably, that we are doing this on a x86 architecture, where the packages are slightly different than the Raspberry Pi's ARM architecture. So we'll just manually install the package and have it ignore the dependency errors:
aptitude download two1 dpkg -i two1_1.0.0-1_all.deb 
Now let it try to fetch as many of the dependencies as possible:
apt-get -f install 
And try to install again (had to do this again, not sure why):
dpkg -i two1_1.0.0-1_all.deb 
The 21 binary should now be available:
which 21 # => /usbin/21 
Before we can run it, we'll need that missing python-256 package. We can install it manually from https://github.com/cloudtools/sha256 :
git clone https://github.com/cloudtools/sha256.git cd sha256 python3 setup.py sdist python3 setup.py install 
Now try to get a status report via the 21 tool:
21 status 
If everything worked out, you should see something like:
You do not have a Bitcoin wallet configured. Let's create one. Press any key ... 
and will also be asked to pick a username for a 21.co account.
All 21 Bitcoin computers are networked together into a VPN using the tool ZeroTier ( https://www.zerotier.com ). Let's also set that up:
wget https://download.zerotier.com/dist/zerotier-one_1.1.0_amd64.deb dpkg -i zerotier-one_1.1.0_amd64.deb 
We'll have to extract the credentials for the specific network they use from 21's zerotier package:
mkdir credentials cd credentials wget https://apt.21.co/pool/z/ze/zerotier-one_1.1.0-1_armhf.deb ar x zerotier-one_1.1.0-1_armhf.deb tar xf data.tar.xz cp valib/zerotier-one/updates.d/ZeroTierOneInstaller-linux-armv6l-1_1_0 /valib/zerotier-one/updates.d/ 
Before we join the network, we need to lock down our machine. That's actually a bit tricky, as these Vagrant images aren't really designed with security in mind, but rather only to be used for local testing. I think it should be enough to do:
passwd vagrant rm /home/vagrant/.ssh/authorized_keys 
Note that you won't be able to use 'vagrant ssh' any longer afterwards, as we just deleted the standard Vagrant key-based login. You'll have to use 'ssh [email protected]' instead. Now we are ready to join the network:
wget https://gist.githubusercontent.com/balajis/6d495bb40fb157a58677/raw/21-join.py python3 21-join.py python3 21-join.py # might have to try this twice as well ifconfig zt0 # will show your new IP within the VPN 
The 21 tools have a concept of both an on-chain balance and an off-chain balance - the latter being managed by 21's server. You can deposit to your on-chain balance, but currently the only way to increase the off-chain balance is by mining or by receiving payments from others. Without the mining chip it's therefore a bit tricky to increase that off-chain balance. I hear that a feature request is being considered, to allow moving funds from on-chain to off-chain.
That's all! If you want to give it a shot, you should probably move fast, as 21 has some DRM in the works, as per this comment: https://www.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/3tnjz7/tutorial_turn_your_35_raspberry_pi_into_a_21/cx7tih3 .
This was brought to you by https://coinado.io/ - cloud torrenting for command line fans. Check us out - we are also big on micropayments! ;-)
submitted by coinadoio to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Easy UASF Node in Debian VM tutorial

So if you have a moderately powerful gaming desktop with a Quad-Core CPU like an i5 or better and 8+GB of RAM, you can easily run your own little UASF node in the background. Once it's done syncing with the network, you won't even notice it's there. Here's how.
You will need :
The following assumes you know how to install Linux in a Virtual Machine
Step I. - Installation. Go through expert install and set up a base system with only ssh server enabled. For partitioning, you can do just one big disk and everything in one partition, but if you happen to have a computer that has both SSD's and HDD's, it would be optimal to create two virtual disks and use a small one for the OS on the SSD and a larger one on the HDD in a custom mount point for the blockchain. Reboot and ssh into the server.
Step II. - Build requirements. A few things need to be taken care of. First, you'll want to edit the /etc/network/interfaces file and set up a static IP. Once that's done, stop by your router and make sure that traffic on port 8333 is forwarded to your debian VM. Then, install some packages we need :
apt update apt upgrade apt install build-essential autoconf libssl-dev libboost-dev libboost-chrono-dev libboost-filesystem-dev libboost-program-options-dev libboost-system-dev libboost-test-dev libboost-thread-dev libevent-dev git libtool pkg-config 
The next one is a bit more annoying. We need Berkeley DB 4.8, and it's a little old. It's packages are in the Debian Squeeze archives, so in the /etc/apt/sources.list file, we need to add :
deb http://archive.debian.org/debian/ squeeze main 
Then remember to update again, and install the thing :
apt install libdb4.8++-dev libdb4.8-dev 
If you intend to also throw on xorg and a UI, you will want Qt as well. Otherwise skip this last step.
install libqt4-dev libprotobuf-dev protobuf-compiler libqrencode-dev 
Step III. - Build time
#Starting from /home/yourUser git clone https://github.com/UASF/bitcoin.git -b 0.14-BIP148 cd bitcoin ./autogen.sh ./configure make make install 
That's it! Well, mostly. Start it with
bitcoind -daemon -disablewallet -datadir=/whereveyou/want/youblockchain 
...and wait about thirty hours to sync with the network. You may want to visit the /whereveyou/want/youblockchain directory and create a permanent bitcoin.conf in there. To enable RPC calls to the server and get it to accept bitcoin-cli commands you'll want to use it to create a usepassword and copy that to your user's /.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf.
Minimal bitcoin.conf example
daemon=1 listen=1 disablewallet=1 server=1 rpcuser=bob rpcpassword=bob's password 
Security I recommend you disable password login and use private key authentication only on ssh, and also restrict iptables rules to the bare minimum that must be allowed for this application. You will need this in your iptables script :
# Allows BITCOIN traffic from anywhere -A INPUT -p tcp --dport 8333 -j ACCEPT # Allows RPC calls to the bitcoin server from localhost -A INPUT -p tcp -s 127.0.0.1 --dport 8332 -j ACCEPT 
Useful ressources :
submitted by the_bolshevik to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Run a Tor Node for $10 Per Year

I'm posting this just as much for my benefit as for everyone else's (so I can refer to it in the future), but this is the be-all-to-end-all on getting it set up easily and quickly.
The Steps
1) Sign up for an account at berry.pw. Buy the one for $10 a year. When it asks for details like hostname and stuff, just enter random data like google.com. Remember your root password though.
2) Choose Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Server as the installation OS. Even if a newer version is released by the time you do this, don't use it. Just wait and use this version, because it is guaranteed to work.
3) Check your email for the login details. I wasted 4 hours talking to tech support (which is sub-par, but you should never have to talk to them if you follow these instructions) because of this: check your spam/junk folder. In the past, this has never happened on Gmail with me, but this email ended up wrongfully in the Junk folder.
4) In the email you got (subject: New Virtual Server Information), record the IP address titled "Main IP", and verify that the root password is correct.
5) Log into your server via SSH. On a Mac or Linux computer, run "ssh [email protected] IP", and enter your root password. On a Windows computer, look up how to log into an SSH server via "Putty".
6) Run "lsb_release -c" and remember what the Codename Output is (it should be "trusty", but if you installed a different version of Ubuntu, then just remember what that output says).
7) Run "apt-get install nano curl fail2ban". fail2ban is for protection to prevent brute for attacks. If you don't want this protection, you can just remove that word. I recommend you leave it, but it automatically blocks your IP if it is making too many requests to the server. To remove it later, run "apt-get remove fail2ban".
8) Run "nano /etc/apt/sources.list"
9) At the bottom, add the following line: deb http://deb.torproject.org/torproject.org trusty main
9a) If the Codename from 4 steps ago wasn't "Trusty", replace "trusty" in the above step with what ever it said, in all lower case.
9b) Exit nano by: Press Control-X, press enter, press Y, press enter.
10) Run the following commands one-by-one. If any give an error, comment to this post and I'll try to help.
gpg --keyserver keys.gnupg.net --recv 886DDD89 gpg --export A3C4F0F979CAA22CDBA8F512EE8CBC9E886DDD89 | apt-key add - sudo apt-get update apt-get install deb.torproject.org-keyring apt-get install tor 
11) Run "nano /etc/totorrc". Make the following changes by typing Control-W to search for keywords in the following changes (same as Find function in any modern text editor)
11a) Remove the "#" in front of each of the following lines:
#ORPort 9001 #DirPort 9030 #ExitPolicy accept *:6660-6667,reject *:* # allow irc ports but no more #ExitPolicy accept *:119 # accept nntp as well as default exit policy 
11b) You can change the numbers after ORPort and DirPort to 443 and 80 if you want to help people behind firewalls (optional step).
11c) At the bottom, add the following line:
ContactInfo [an email address that can handle spam without brackets] - [Bitcoin Address if you have one for donations without brackets] 
11d) Press Control-X, press enter, press Y, press enter.
12) Run "service tor reload".
13) View the log by running "cat /valog/tolog". You can run this in the future to view the log and make sure everything is working fine.
13a) However, there's an easier way to test the server. Go to this port checker, type in your main IP from the email at the beginning of the tutorial, and enter 9001 in the port box. Press enter, make sure it's working. Then do it with port 9030. If those both work, you're all set! If not, post in the Reddit and we'll try to fix it.
13b) Further testing: After a few hours (give it a minimum of 6 hours), search for your IP at the Tor node lookup service. If it's not there, check to make sure the ports are forwarded. Post here for help if you'd like.
14) Enjoy helping the world! In 365 days, you'll see your PayPal account another $10 lighter. But it's all worth it.
Please donate with bitcoin and changetip if you like what I've done here. Thanks for reading.
Resources:
submitted by ThePiGuy2 to TOR [link] [comments]

Has anyone on Wheezy successfully installed bitcoin-qt? If so, how?!

I have tried so many guides on so many forums and none of them have yielded any success.
I think I got closest by following these directions, but ultimately there was a .tar.gz file instead of a .deb file which doesn't want to install. I made it was far as running dpkg-buildpackage and it did nothing but spit out warnings and errors for 200 lines before exiting, citing "unrepresentable changes to source".
This is really frustrating. Any help would be appreciated.
submitted by augurate_form to debian [link] [comments]

Installing OpenBazaar on Raspberry Pi 3 (Raspbian "Jessie") Is A Pain - and does not work

Hello, hope to get help in this Bitcoin community which should have the main users of OpenBazaar.
I cannot get this run. Installing on Ubuntu or Linux Mint is utmost simple with the downloadable debian packages (*.deb).
In short:
For the Raspberry Pi (Raspbian Linux) I find various different tutorials on the web, all of which are somehow different and incomplete and of different age (so not sure what Openbazaar and what Raspbian version they refer to). I get one error after another. After several hours I am giving up now. I have installed so many other packages that are allegedly required for OpenBazaar (in one tutorial or another)... but it still does not work.
Not to mention the need to separately install the OpenBazaar Server and Client and the different configuration options, and no tutorial that really explains everything in a proper way how all components work together and what to do depending on the use-case.
This is a shame. OpenBazaar should FIRST run on the Raspberry, because the Raspberry is a low-power-consumption device that can run 24/7 with an electricity bill of only 5-10 EUR per year. And OpenBazaar as a decentralized marketplace is designed for exactly this mode of operation - always online! No way would I use a normal computer for this.
Has anybody successfully managed to install OpenBazaar (1.1.3) on "Raspian Jessie"?
Is a tutorial available that really works completely? Or even better, a debian package?
Actually I was inspired buying a Raspberry Pi because of OpenBazaar in the first place, and now I am stuck.
A good tutorial should include best practice recommendations on all parts, including:
Finally, what I am desperately missing is information how to backup and restore OpenBazaar configurations and move them from one computer to another. For example, I have installed OpenBazaar on my Linux Mint PC some weeks ago and created an account and a listing already, of course with OpenBazaar ID. Needless to say that now that I install OpenBazaar on my Raspberry, I want to use the same account there (instead of on my computer), such that information is not lost.
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[Table] IAmA Ubuntu Community Manager at Canonical, author/speaker on Community Management and best practice, and play in metal band Severed Fifth

Verified? (This bot cannot verify AMAs just yet)
Date: 2012-06-05
Link to submission (Has self-text)
Link to my post
Questions Answers
Not sure if any of this is really your job descriptions, but they're the questions I have about Ubuntu anyway. I believe the criticism around Unity could be divided into two broad categories (1) fear of change and (2) critcism about the design/stability of Unity. Back when we originally released Unity into Ubuntu, there was a lot of (1) and some (2). With Ubuntu 12.04 there is a little (1) and not much (2). Unity in 12.04 is significantly faster, better designed, and better executed and I most of the responses I have seen to 12.04 have been praising Unity.
How are you and the rest of Canonical dealing with all of the criticisms of Unity? How are you and the rest of Canonical dealing with all of the criticisms of Unity?
What's the process of implementing Ubuntu for Android like? What do you expect the response to it to be, and how are device manufacturers responding to it? Is Canonical trying to become the Apple of Linux? What other strategies are you implementing to help Linux go mainstream? In terms of fear of change, there will always be some folks who don't like it: that is fine; we have many wonderful options for desktops in Ubuntu. Some folks though feel like we are "dumbing down Linux"; I thoroughly disagree with that notion. Linux should be for everyone, not just Linux geeks, and we want Ubuntu to bring Free Software to everyone, not just a fiefdom populated by those with significant technical skills. What's the process of implementing Ubuntu for Android like? What do you expect the response to it to be, and how are device manufacturers responding to it? Is Canonical trying to become the Apple of Linux? What other strategies are you implementing to help Linux go mainstream?
Can we please get an easier RAID implementation on the desktop flavor Ubuntu? Can we please get an easier RAID implementation on the desktop flavor Ubuntu?
I believe the criticism around Unity could be divided into two broad categories (1) fear of change and (2) critcism about the design/stability of Unity. "I fear Canonical hasn't been listening to the specific concerns of its community when it comes to Unity in particular. It's not that I'm afraid of change, or that it's unstable, it's that it's ugly, unwieldy to use, and non-configurable. The lack of control and configuration coupled with the fact it's been forced down our throats is what really seems to irk the community".
Some folks though feel like we are "dumbing down Linux"; I thoroughly disagree with that notion. Linux should be for everyone, not just Linux geeks. Also, nothing has been "forced down your throat": this is Free Software and you are free to use something else.
Ubuntu, as it stands, is near unusable for a lot of power users who do heavy development work and constantly need to switch applications - and it's 100% because of Unity and "simplifying" the distro. I'll personally be sticking to Debian until this regression goes away. I would consider myself a power user, I am regularly switching applications and it works fine. But here's the thing: this is all personal opinion. It works well for me, perfect! It doesn't work well for you, well you can either help us fix it or use something else. Perfect! Either way, we all get to use Free Software. :-)
Edit: Er, it looks like pseudolobster hit my concern already. Carry on.
Sure, maybe it's time for Ubuntu to move on and try this really ambitious move to dumb down linux for old people, alienating its previous userbase, but it's a damn shame because I used to really like Ubuntu. "Sure, maybe it's time for Ubuntu to move on and try this really ambitious move to dumb down linux for old people, alienating its previous userbase, but it's a damn shame because I used to really like Ubuntu". I always hate to see the term "dumbing down" because it is exclusionary: Ubuntu is for everyone...not just for people with a certain level of expertise. The difference is...for a novice user, they require simple defaults otherwise we lose them, a more technically savvy can dive below the surface and install additional configurability.
Are you still actively trying to push Ubuntu to Android manufacturers/developers? If so, have any responded with any interest? Yes, the convergent device (Ubuntu on Android) is a key area of focus. Canonical engineers have been continuing to build it out and our business team has been working with various handset makers to sign agreements. I believe there are a few deals underway.
Also, any chance that private developers (Cyanogenmod/MIUI/AOKP/AOSP) will get a chance to bake Ubuntu into custom ROMs? As for people taking it and baking it into custom ROMs, I don't see why this couldn't happen in the future. It is unlikely to be one of our standard releases as most people don't install new OSs on their phones, but I am sure the software will be available for integration some time.
You know me in real life, although not by this username. I install a new OS on my phone regularly...so, you know at least one. ;-) Hrm... :-)
How did the Humble Bundle thing go? We're they/Ubuntu receptive and it all went smoothly? Any chance of getting the back catalog into the software center? The Humble Indie Bundle release has gone really well. We had nearly 10000 downloads in 72 hours, and the downloads are continuing. A number of previous games are in the Ubuntu Software Center and we are working on others too.
Also any chance to standardizing a set of libraries for game development in Ubuntu, kind of like what ya'll did for Gtk apps and Quickly? As for Quickly and game development: I would love to see that, we just need a community member to contribute to this. If you (or someone else) wants to help, I would be happy to help you get connected to the right person.
Does this mean that you plan to allow us to link games from previous bundles that are in the software center to our account? I would like to be able to link my purchase of World of Good, Braid, Bittrip runner, and probably othes so that I can more easily download and install them. I think that would be the optimal option.
On a non "I h8 unity" tangent, gaming (and Netflix, to an extent) is a big part of the reason I'm still on Windows some of the time. Are you excited that Steam is coming to Linux? What are the major hurdles, in your opinion, to a better gaming experience on Linux? I am stoked about Steam coming to Linux. The challenge will be hardware support for some graphics cards (most work great), but I suspect that Steam on Linux will apply pressure to the card makers.
What do you see as the future of the music industry? Big, professional, signed artists with major labels.
Newer artists with smaller labels, still probably working part time.
For the big artists, the traditional music industry (make music, sell it, go on tour, sell overpriced merch and tickets etc) works well. This is because for these artists the music companies work like VCs: they put lots of money into different projects and every so often they get a Justin Bieber.
For smaller artists, they are typically working with small labels with barely any marketing budget. This means they sign their value (their music) to a label who often doesn't have the resources to bring the artist up to a higher level.
I believe that for smaller artists, the Creative Commons is the way to go. We did this with Severed Fifth: we grew a community, raised $5000 in funding to record our album, and gave it away for free so others can use it. Our music has appeared in all kinds of music videos on YouTube, in games and elsewhere.
The challenge is for smaller artists who work full time on their music. For weekend warriors like me, money is not that of a deal as I have a job, so giving music away for free is fine. If you are relying on getting paid at a show and need to sell that merch, giving away your music is a big deal, so I understand how some folks are resistant to it.
What type of communication is there between Ubuntu/Canonical and the major PC game developers in regards to promoting more native Linux/.deb version of games? We have a team of people at Canonical who are regularly reaching out to games publishers (e.g. EA) to encourage them to bring their technology to Ubuntu.
I want to develop Free Software and make money out of it. What business models do you suggest so that it can be profitable ? Here are a few models I can think of : make the source available but sell the packaged program ; make the software rely on a service that is not free ; donations ; create closed-source add-ons ; etc. What are your ideas about it, Jono ? Sell it in the Ubuntu Software Center.
Have a donations page on your website.
Sell additional services or materials such as training books, audiobooks, etc.
I think this could make the good stuff happen. :-)
I've been interested in implementing an open source alternative to high end audio studio's software. Has there been any dialog with big publishers (like Steinberg, Avid, Propellerhead, etc) about getting their DAWs crossed over to Linux? Is there any open source project related to audio that has been getting your attention?
Do you see Ubuntu and open software making their move into professional studios? Do you see Ubuntu and open software making their move into professional studios?
Is there any kind of obstacles that open source audio development has faced these this last decade? Is there any open source project related to audio that has been getting your attention? Is there any kind of obstacles that open source audio development has faced these this last decade?
Has there been any dialog with big publishers (like Steinberg, Avid, Propellerhead, etc) about getting their DAWs crossed over to Linux?
Thank you for the answer. :D May the Linux desktop live long and prosper. :) Live long and prosper! :-)
Want to sort me out a summer intern position in your London office? What's that, you do? You're too kind. I am not currently taking any interns. Sorry!
What would be in your opinion the improvements Ubuntu brings to the table compared to other OS (Windows, Mac OS or even Android). Better range of pre-installed software for most users.
What Linux distribution are you running? (Ubuntu?) Secure and virus free experience.
Do you think that major companies feel threatened/insecure with open software, and that is why ATI/nVidia are reluctant to release the libraries for Linux? (at least this was a pain in the ass when I tryed getting the right drivers for my video and sound cards) Free and open, and with a commitment to five years of free security updates for LTSs.
What is your favourite game from the range 2010~2012? Sleek, simple, and elegant user experience.
What is your favorite pokemon? Passionate and friendly community.
Wide range of software in the Ubuntu Software Center.
Strong developer platform.
Etc....
Ubuntu 12.04 for another few weeks until I upgrade to 12.10dev.
I don't think they fear it, I think they just can't justify the investment until they feel the market is bigger.
Not really sure, I am not really a big gamer. :-)
I am not into Pokemon. :-)
Hello, I currently have a home Ubuntu 10.04 server, and I use Lubuntu 12.04 on my Desktop, love them both. I think flavors and derivatives are awesome, and we are very supportive of them. Part of the reason we divide up Ubuntu engineering into Kernel, Foundations, and Desktop is to ensure that the Kernel and Foundations output can be useful for flavors and derivatives too.
I am wondering about what you think about all of the distros that are based on Ubuntu, such as Mint and Pinguy. Does it annoy you that people are moving over to these Ubuntu spinoff's? Or is this just something you expect due to working in the linux community? Our goal here is to build a powerful Free Software platform, and encouraging others to create flavors and derivs is a great feature in building that platform.
What does your job entail as a Community Manager? What does your job entail as a Community Manager? My job is divided into a few different areas. Firstly I build strategy around where we need to build growth and focus on our community (e.g. most recently a strong strategic focus is app developers). Secondly, I manage a team of five community managers who work on different areas (Daniel Holbach (developers), David Planella (app devs / translations), Jorge Castro (cloud), Michael Hall (app devs and upstreams), and Nicholas Skaggs (QA)). Thirdly, I work to ensure Canonical staff members are working with the community and that the values and needs of the community are well served. Finally, I work directly with the community to resolve issues, focus on certain areas, and respond to questions from the community and press.
How often/how long do you spend doing things related to your job? How often/how long do you spend doing things related to your job?
What are your top 5 favourite bands? What are your top 5 favourite bands?
canonical seems to have plowed its own furrow in a number of places: it adopted bzr, then git owned the world. It developed launchpad, but everyone went to github. It threw its lot in with eucalyptus, and then jumped horse to openstack. These examples, upstart, storm, etc. - in general, the open source contributions canonical makes tend to be less than successful compared with other companies. is it bad at managing open source projects, or just bad at marketing them? Each of the technologies you highlighted have been successful, but not neccessarily the most popular. In technology I don't think popularity neccessarily means success. As an example, bzr serves our community really well, so does Launchpad, but I agree it has seen limited wider success. I think Canonical manages Open Source projects well...Ubuntu has been very successful, but I think it boils down to what people want...people want Ubuntu, but in many cases people want git instead of bzr.
i think a few years ago, shuttleworth was saying that canonical was not yet breaking even, but would do - by 2008, then 2010. since then it has started even more projects, in even more markets, hired even more people - presumably that goal is still a ways away. do you look forward to the day when canonical doesn't need to rely on largesse? I am glad we are continuing to invest: we have big, hairy, goals. To achieve them we need growth, focus, and strong teams, and I think we have these. We will break even, but this is a game that needs a lot of upfront investment and passionate people.
Will there be a Bitcoin wallet provided in the Software Center soon? If someone submits it for inclusion then yes! :-)
If anyone is reading this and they have made a wallet, find out how to submit it at Link to developer.ubuntu.com
What's your favorite app in the Software Center? My fave app is the GIMP.
Have you ever met Mark Shuttleworth? Indeed, he was over at my house for a BBQ a few weeks ago.
How is he? I have worked with him since I joined Canonical. He is a cool guy, very technically savvy, with a strong vision, and a strong loyalty to people who are loyal to him. He is very passionate about the community and sits on our Community Council and Technical Board and often gets involved in community matters.
Have you ever negotiated with Valve for bringing steam to Ubuntu/Linux? There has been some discussions.
Any chance of another LugRadio reunion show anytime soon? I've re-played the Devil's Drink segment about a hundred times, still always manages to make me laugh. I would love to do another LugRadio show. We just need to figure out a way of getting the team together, which mainly involved me getting to England to record a show. Maybe we could try a G+ thing sometime. :-)
The accomplishments system is a pretty cool play on the gameification theme, but it is very Ubuntu based. Is there a plan for supporting accomplishments that are totally unrelated to Ubuntu and computing? Absolutely! Right now it is very Ubuntu centric as we are building for what we know, but the system supports accomplishments from other projects too. If someone wants to build an Accomplishments Collection for Fedora, FreeBSD, or whatever, the system supports it. You can read more about creating accomplishments at Link to wiki.ubuntu.com
The only piece of the core system that is very Ubuntu specific is that it uses Ubuntu One. If someone wants to submit a branch to support other backends we would be happy to review. :-)
Jono, what was the fate of Ubuntu's "Four Horsemen" since you guys hired a fifth member of the team? Are you guys now officially called the Five Horsemen? These are the questions that keep Ubuntu redditors awake at night. We are now the six horsemen. :-)
My Question is if the ubuntu developers are thinking in integrating this feature on future versions of Unity? My Question is if the ubuntu developers are thinking in integrating this feature on future versions of Unity?
I would pay to listen again Lugradio or Shot of Jaq and I don't think I'm the only one. Have you ever thought about making money with a podcast? I would pay to listen again Lugradio or Shot of Jaq and I don't think I'm the only one. Have you ever thought about making money with a podcast?
I guess you would love to see available on the Ubuntu Software Center mainstream popular games even if they have DRM and some other important applications like Photoshop, Autocad and etc... But if we fill the desktop with a lot of these things at the end what would be the difference between an Ubuntu desktop and a OSX desktop? Don't you think that open source should create open alternatives and try a different approach? I guess you would love to see available on the Ubuntu Software Center mainstream popular games even if they have DRM and some other important applications like Photoshop, Autocad and etc... But if we fill the desktop with a lot of these things at the end what would be the difference between an Ubuntu desktop and a OSX desktop? Don't you think that open source should create open alternatives and try a different approach?
Lets try again. Unity had terrible reviews. Why did Canonical not listen to their users about the introduction of this? You have to admit, it was a pretty bad reception. Canonical's response to this was similar to RIM's response about poor innovation, or the complete lack of it. They ignored it. That's better, thanks for presenting your question more politely.
When we introduced Unity we knew that chunks of it needed more sheening and refinement. What was important to us was to ensure that Unity was in good shape for Ubuntu 12.04, our next LTS, this is why we dropped in a few releases early to give our users a chance to play with it, share their experiences, share their concerns, and give us a chance to fix these outstanding problems.
Now, as you say, some folks were not happy with Unity. I think part of this was that those early Unity releases has a pretty tiny amount of QA applied: they were crashy, and when Unity crashed, it would take compiz down with it too. To remedy this we built an automated testing lab, and hired someone on my team to build a community of manual testers. I think most would agree that the Unity in 12.04 is much higher quality.
When we introduced Unity originally some folks just didn't like the design. This is always tough: design is emotional, and so is change, so a change with a new design is really emotional. Now some of the feedback at this time was constructive: it highlighted specific deficiencies in the design, problems in the implementation and other things. The design and engineering teams read all of this feedback with interest and reacted to much of it in future releases.
Some folks just didn't like Unity for the fact it was "different" and "why didn't you guys just keep shipping GNOME 2". For us to bring Free Software to more and more people we need to constantly evolve, and Unity was a step along that evolution. We have expanded our target demographic to not just Linux enthusiasts but general consumers too, and we found that GNOME 2 did not serve general consumers as well...as such Unity was designed to bridge that gap.
Now, of course, Unity is not perfect. There is still lots of work to be done, and many improvements to be made, but I think we are on the right track.
One thing I can assure you is that Canonical did not ignore this feedback: quite the opposite, but we did focus on the constructive feedback as opposed to the rantings on social media networks. Ubuntu is a shared project, our community is an integral part of the project, but we have to have a platform of respect and collaboration to do good work...and this is why we focused on the feedback from those who wanted to engage as opposed to yell.
I hope this answers your question. :-)
It's closely related to my major and my career plans, so I'm really curious what goes into it and what kind of surprises I might find myself confronting down the road. I think many new community managers don't build enough strategy into the plans. They have generalized plans around "growth" and "awareness". If you are working professionally for a company, this lack of meat on the bone doesn't give the company or the community enough assurances around the work.
Do you have someone on your team that is focussed on the business desktop users community? Today, not really. Our primary focus is on the collaborative contributor community. This is changing as we focus more and more on user communities (e.g. the app dev community who only want to use Ubuntu as a platform).
2) For those of us looking to contribute to Ubuntu (that have not done so in the past) what areas is the OS lacking, or what areas could we best contribute our skills? I think we need more and more folks helping with LoCo Teams (Link to loco.ubuntu.com and Documentation. We could always use hands on deck there!
Will we ever be able to run DRM protected Silverlight apps like Netflix, or SkyGo? It's pretty much the only thing I can't do on Ubuntu. I would love if we could have Netflix, but it depends on if Netflix are willing to make a Linux client.
I feel you're making a really big mistake here: Pursuing a new demographic while ignoring your core. We are not ignore Linux enthusiasts...we are just not focusing purely on them. Some people presume that just because we don't have everything that a Linux enthusiast needs we are "ignoring" them. We want to build a system for everyone, and that requires a delicate balance.
As I said earlier, for a novice user if we include too much configurabilty that doesn't make sense or is not properly designed, user testing shows that it makes Ubuntu less useful. Technically savvy people can install and add additional configurability where desired. This is why I think it is better to have a simple Unity by default and then allow people to tune and tweak it with additional tools like MyUnity where needed. This way you get the best of both worlds: a simple out of the box experience, yet Linux enthusiasts can hotrod their system to get more if they want.
Any chance of another album any soon? Also, just wanted so say thanks for all the work you in the band and the Ubuntu community. We are currently writing a new Severed Fifth album. I am also thinking of recording an acoustic album for charity.
What can we expect for the future of raspberry pi and ubuntu? I am not really sure. I have not been particularly involved in the discussions with the Raspberry Pi folks: I would love to see Ubuntu running on there.
As a Python developer I would like to ask how the Python 3 integration as the standard version with the next release (12.10) is going? Also, thanks for Ubuntu, just love it for work and personal use and Unity makes it all a joy now. :) To be honest, I am not sure how the Python 3 has progressed thus far...I know it is a core release goal, so it should go pretty well. :-)
Tits or ass? You said any question.... I like all animals, not just Blue Tits and Donkeys.
As a English Ex-Pat Do you have things other than BBQ'ing you are trying to get into the swing of? Perhaps home brewing? I would love to brew some beer. I worry about creating an ultra-death-brew though and losing a weekend. :-)
Is Canonical accepting interns at all, and if so how can I get to know more? Is Canonical accepting interns at all, and if so how can I get to know more?
Aren't you heartily sick of every public discussion you take part in getting hijacked by the small, but excessively vocal, minority of people of just can't deal with people doing some actual work to try and improve the Linux desktop experience (i.e Unity) and prepared to do anything active about their own problems? Aren't you heartily sick of every public discussion you take part in getting hijacked by the small, but excessively vocal, minority of people of just can't deal with people doing some actual work to try and improve the Linux desktop experience (i.e Unity) and prepared to do anything active about their own problems? There is definitely a vocal minority, but my take on this has been that every opinion and critique is fair so long as it is respectful, accurate, and preferably in the interests of finding a solution. Some folks have tried Ubuntu 12.04 and still don't like Unity and have a list of reasons why, and they fairly and respectfully share those views: that kind of discourse is wonderful...it helps us improve.
Did you pick the band for UDS-Q? They were awesome. Did you pick the band for UDS-Q? They were awesome.
Unity from a year ago ... ignore these people. If Unity a year ago was so bad that you're ignoring the early adopters who got burned by it, why on earth did you let it out the door? Why should they trust you now? Software is never "done", you have to release early and release often; that is at the core of how Open Source works.
"Unity" means − among other things − "the same interface for Desktops, TV, phones, tablets, cars". Have you put any thoughts in Home Automation interfaces, which I think can become a big thing in the future ? While not a core focus of the Unity team right now, I would love to see a community derivative Ubuntu distribution for home automation. I think it could be awesome. :-)
What advice can you give to someone who is new to the field of Community Management? Without wishing to push my book, I think it will be helpful for you. Just make sure you get the new 2nd Edition: there is lots of other good content in there.
My advice for getting started is to study the work of other community managers, and listen and learn from their experience. Community management is a skill that is passed on between different people, and that kind of observational work is useful in seeing patterns and approaches to the profession.
Is the 2nd edition available as an e-book? Yep! :-)
Will you be dressing up as a spherical cow for halloween? Because I'm having a damned hard time finding a quetzal costume. Srsly. :) LOL! I hope so!
Will you be coming to Ground Kontrol after the Puppet Labs party this year, and if so, will we have to physically carry you back across the river? You don't have a keynote this year, so no excuses. :P. I can try. :-)
Any plans to provide funding/grants to the LoCo teams to help them organize events or for doing what they do? Outside of our current funding, I am not sure we will be able to commit to further funding. What I would love to see is LoCo Teams supporting themselves more and more with Kickstarter campaigns and donations drives to help cover any other expenses. :-)
Are there any plans to introduce the minimizing of apps by clicking or holding their icon in the launcher? What is wrong with the minimize button? :-)
Also, are there any plans to make the dash more efficient in finding apps, files, music etc.? The design team are constantly working to improve search and findability, and I think you will see some improvements in the 12.10 cycle in this area.
Hi, recently I bought a samsung series 5 ultrabook and tried to install ubuntu on it. I discovered I couldn't. Is this some king of boycott or the problem is me? Greetings from Brazil. No idea: it should install fine. Was there a software error?
Checked to make sure you had a beard. Not disappointed. LOL!
'Did my first parachute jump' is exactly the sort of thing I was aiming at with the question, human verified accomplishements, perhaps with geo-tagged photo proof. Part of the original plan was to have human-awarded accomplishments. The classic use case we have here is something such as an Ubuntu contributor wanting to thank someone for some great work that cannot be auto-detected with the current system. We would give them the ability to award a trophy to this person so it appears in their My Trophies view.
For your parachute jump example, we could potentially set up a system where a set of people can issue trophies when they see proof of something. For example, you send someone a photo of you doing the jump and then they award the trophy.
This would be great for bucket lists (e.g. visiting a set of landmarks) and then getting trophies for each one you visit.
It is all possible, we just need more hands on deck to write the code. :-)
My uncle has ubuntu on his 3rd and 4th computers. I like to call his little son "ubuntu" Lols were had. Awesome!
Last updated: 2012-06-09 23:45 UTC
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minar bitcoin con nicehash en ubuntu Installing the Electrum Bitcoin in Debian 9 (Stretch) Installing Ethereum in Debian 9 (Stretch) install bitcoin full node on debian 4. Installing Bitcoin Core on Linux

To install .deb file, you may use: sudo dpkg -i file.deb sudo apt-get install -f sudo dpkg -i file.deb The second line is to fix broken packages if the installation fails, then, install again to complete the installation. Or by using: gdebi - Simple tool to install deb files. This tutorial explains how to install and use Bitcoin Core on Debian Linux. Bitcoin Core is the official Bitcoin Wallet from bitcoin.org. I will use the latest version from the GIT repository at bitcoin.org. In order to compile and run, Bitcoin Core depends on some other tools which must be installed prior to compiling : Install some dependencies: For bitcoin-core. sudo apt-get install build ... Bitcoin Core ist ein gemeinschaftliches, freies Software-Projekt, veröffentlicht unter der MIT-Lizenz. Release-Signaturen überprüfen Download über Torrent Quelltext Versionshistorie anzeigen. Bitcoin Core Release Signierschlüssel v0.8.6 - 0.9.2.1 v0.9.3 - 0.10.2 v0.11.0+ Oder wählen Sie Ihr Betriebssystem . Windows exe - zip. Mac OS X dmg - tar.gz. Linux (tgz) 64 bit. ARM Linux 64 bit ... install a bitcoin cpuminer on ubuntu/debian. GitHub Gist: instantly share code, notes, and snippets. Enable snaps on Debian and install bitcoin-core. Snaps are applications packaged with all their dependencies to run on all popular Linux distributions from a single build. They update automatically and roll back gracefully. Snaps are discoverable and installable from the Snap Store, an app store with an audience of millions. Enable snapd. On Debian 9 (Stretch) and newer, snap can be installed ...

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minar bitcoin con nicehash en ubuntu

Best way to install Packages through command Line The Crypto Dad shows you how to set up the Ethereum wallet in Debian 9 (Stretch). We go through downloading (with verification) and installing the Ethereum wallet. Important software used is ... Java Project Tutorial - Make Login and Register Form Step by Step Using NetBeans And MySQL Database - Duration: 3:43:32. 1BestCsharp blog 7,662,402 views sudo add-apt-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt bitcoind Linux terminal new stuff: clear, ll, cd, touch, echo, cat, shutdown www.bitcoinhackers.org #Dash #Cryptocurrency #Linux In this video, I install the Dash Electrum wallet software on the Linux distro Debian 9. To install Debian Linux, I downloaded only one file: debian-9.9.0-amd64-DVD-1 ...

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