How Long Does it Take to Mine a Bitcoin? - U.Today

Why is Blockstream CTO Greg Maxwell u/nullc trying to pretend AXA isn't one of the top 5 "companies that control the world"? AXA relies on debt & derivatives to pretend it's not bankrupt. Million-dollar Bitcoin would destroy AXA's phony balance sheet. How much is AXA paying Greg to cripple Bitcoin?

Here was an interesting brief exchange between Blockstream CTO Greg Maxwell u/nullc and u/BitAlien about AXA:
https://np.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/62d2yq/why_bitcoin_is_under_attack/dfm6jt?context=3
The "non-nullc" side of the conversation has already been censored by r\bitcoin - but I had previously archived it here :)
https://archive.fo/yWnWh#selection-2613.0-2615.1
u/BitAlien says to u/nullc :
Blockstream is funded by big banks, for example, AXA.
https://blockstream.com/2016/02/02/blockstream-new-investors-55-million-series-a.html
u/nullc says to u/BitAlien :
is funded by big banks, for example, AXA
AXA is a French multinational insurance firm.
But I guess we shouldn't expect much from someone who thinks miners unilatterally control bitcoin.
Typical semantics games and hair-splitting and bullshitting from Greg.
But I guess we shouldn't expect too much honesty or even understanding from someone like Greg who thinks that miners don't control Bitcoin.
AXA-owned Blockstream CTO Greg Maxwell u/nullc doesn't understand how Bitcoin mining works
Mining is how you vote for rule changes. Greg's comments on BU revealed he has no idea how Bitcoin works. He thought "honest" meant "plays by Core rules." [But] there is no "honesty" involved. There is only the assumption that the majority of miners are INTELLIGENTLY PROFIT-SEEKING. - ForkiusMaximus
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/5zxl2l/mining_is_how_you_vote_for_rule_changes_gregs/
AXA-owned Blockstream CTO Greg Maxwell u/nullc is economically illiterate
Adam Back & Greg Maxwell are experts in mathematics and engineering, but not in markets and economics. They should not be in charge of "central planning" for things like "max blocksize". They're desperately attempting to prevent the market from deciding on this. But it will, despite their efforts.
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/46052e/adam_back_greg_maxwell_are_experts_in_mathematics/)
AXA-owned Blockstream CTO Greg Maxwell u/nullc doesn't understand how fiat works
Gregory Maxwell nullc has evidently never heard of terms like "the 1%", "TPTB", "oligarchy", or "plutocracy", revealing a childlike naïveté when he says: "‘Majority sets the rules regardless of what some minority thinks’ is the governing principle behind the fiats of major democracies."
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/44qr31/gregory_maxwell_unullc_has_evidently_never_heard/
AXA-owned Blockstream CTO Greg Maxwell u/nullc is toxic to Bitcoin
People are starting to realize how toxic Gregory Maxwell is to Bitcoin, saying there are plenty of other coders who could do crypto and networking, and "he drives away more talent than he can attract." Plus, he has a 10-year record of damaging open-source projects, going back to Wikipedia in 2006.
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/4klqtg/people_are_starting_to_realize_how_toxic_gregory/
So here we have Greg this week, desperately engaging in his usual little "semantics" games - claiming that AXA isn't technically a bank - when the real point is that:
AXA is clearly one of the most powerful fiat finance firms in the world.
Maybe when he's talking about the hairball of C++ spaghetti code that him and his fellow devs at Core/Blockstream are slowing turning their version of Bitcoin's codebase into... in that arcane (and increasingly irrelevant :) area maybe he still can dazzle some people with his usual meaningless technically correct but essentially erroneous bullshit.
But when it comes to finance and economics, Greg is in way over his head - and in those areas, he can't bullshit anyone. In fact, pretty much everything Greg ever says about finance or economics or banks is simply wrong.
He thinks he's proved some point by claiming that AXA isn't technically a bank.
But AXA is far worse than a mere "bank" or a mere "French multinational insurance company".
AXA is one of the top-five "companies that control the world" - and now (some people think) AXA is in charge of paying for Bitcoin "development".
A recent infographic published in the German Magazine "Die Zeit" showed that AXA is indeed the second-most-connected finance company in the world - right at the rotten "core" of the "fantasy fiat" financial system that runs our world today.
Who owns the world? (1) Barclays, (2) AXA, (3) State Street Bank. (Infographic in German - but you can understand it without knowing much German: "Wem gehört die Welt?" = "Who owns the world?") AXA is the #2 company with the most economic poweconnections in the world. And AXA owns Blockstream.
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/5btu02/who_owns_the_world_1_barclays_2_axa_3_state/
The link to the PDF at Die Zeit in the above OP is gone now - but there's other copies online:
https://www.konsumentenschutz.ch/sks/content/uploads/2014/03/Wem-geh%C3%B6rt-die-Welt.pdfother
http://www.zeit.de/2012/23/IG-Capitalist-Network
https://archive.fo/o/EzRea/https://www.konsumentenschutz.ch/sks/content/uploads/2014/03/Wem-geh%C3%B6rt-die-Welt.pdf
Plus there's lots of other research and articles at sites like the financial magazine Forbes, or the scientific publishing site plos.org, with articles which say the same thing - all the tables and graphs show that:
AXA is consistently among the top five "companies that control everything"
https://www.forbes.com/sites/bruceupbin/2011/10/22/the-147-companies-that-control-everything/#56b72685105b
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0025995
http://www98.griffith.edu.au/dspace/bitstream/handle/10072/37499/64037_1.pdf;sequence=1
https://www.outsiderclub.com/report/who-really-controls-the-world/1032
AXA is right at the rotten "core" of the world financial system. Their last CEO was even the head of the friggin' Bilderberg Group.
Blockstream is now controlled by the Bilderberg Group - seriously! AXA Strategic Ventures, co-lead investor for Blockstream's $55 million financing round, is the investment arm of French insurance giant AXA Group - whose CEO Henri de Castries has been chairman of the Bilderberg Group since 2012.
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/47zfzt/blockstream_is_now_controlled_by_the_bilderberg/
So, let's get a few things straight here.
"AXA" might not be a household name to many people.
And Greg was "technically right" when he denied that AXA is a "bank" (which is basically the only kind of "right" that Greg ever is these days: "technically" :-)
But AXA is one of the most powerful finance companies in the world.
AXA was started as a French insurance company.
And now it's a French multinational insurance company.
But if you study up a bit on AXA, you'll see that they're not just any old "insurance" company.
AXA has their fingers in just about everything around the world - including a certain team of toxic Bitcoin devs who are radically trying to change Bitcoin:
And ever since AXA started throwing tens of millions of dollars in filthy fantasy fiat at a certain toxic dev named Gregory Maxwell, CTO of Blockstream, suddenly he started saying that we can't have nice things like the gradually increasing blocksizes (and gradually increasing Bitcoin prices - which fortunately tend to increase proportional to the square of the blocksize because of Metcalfe's law :-) which were some of the main reasons most of us invested in Bitcoin in the first place.
My, my, my - how some people have changed!
Greg Maxwell used to have intelligent, nuanced opinions about "max blocksize", until he started getting paid by AXA, whose CEO is head of the Bilderberg Group - the legacy financial elite which Bitcoin aims to disintermediate. Greg always refuses to address this massive conflict of interest. Why?
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/4mlo0z/greg_maxwell_used_to_have_intelligent_nuanced/
Previously, Greg Maxwell u/nullc (CTO of Blockstream), Adam Back u/adam3us (CEO of Blockstream), and u/theymos (owner of r\bitcoin) all said that bigger blocks would be fine. Now they prefer to risk splitting the community & the network, instead of upgrading to bigger blocks. What happened to them?
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/5dtfld/previously_greg_maxwell_unullc_cto_of_blockstream/
"Even a year ago I said I though we could probably survive 2MB" - nullc
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/43mond/even_a_year_ago_i_said_i_though_we_could_probably/
Core/Blockstream supporters like to tiptoe around the facts a lot - hoping we won't pay attention to the fact that they're getting paid by a company like AXA, or hoping we'll get confused if Greg says that AXA isn't a bank but rather an insurance firm.
But the facts are the facts, whether AXA is an insurance giant or a bank:
  • AXA would be exposed as bankrupt in a world dominated by a "counterparty-free" asset class like Bitcoin.
  • AXA pays Greg's salary - and Greg is one of the major forces who has been actively attempting to block Bitcoin's on-chain scaling - and there's no way getting around the fact that artificially small blocksizes do lead to artificially low prices.
AXA kinda reminds me of AIG
If anyone here was paying attention when the cracks first started showing in the world fiat finance system around 2008, you may recall the name of another mega-insurance company, that was also one of the most connected finance companies in the world: AIG.
Falling Giant: A Case Study Of AIG
What was once the unthinkable occurred on September 16, 2008. On that date, the federal government gave the American International Group - better known as AIG (NYSE:AIG) - a bailout of $85 billion. In exchange, the U.S. government received nearly 80% of the firm's equity. For decades, AIG was the world's biggest insurer, a company known around the world for providing protection for individuals, companies and others. But in September, the company would have gone under if it were not for government assistance.
http://www.investopedia.com/articles/economics/09/american-investment-group-aig-bailout.asp
Why the Fed saved AIG and not Lehman
Bernanke did say he believed an AIG failure would be "catastrophic," and that the heavy use of derivatives made the AIG problem potentially more explosive.
An AIG failure, thanks to the firm's size and its vast web of trading partners, "would have triggered an intensification of the general run on international banking institutions," Bernanke said.
http://fortune.com/2010/09/02/why-the-fed-saved-aig-and-not-lehman/
Just like AIG, AXA is a "systemically important" finance company - one of the biggest insurance companies in the world.
And (like all major banks and insurance firms), AXA is drowning in worthless debt and bets (derivatives).
Most of AXA's balance sheet would go up in a puff of smoke if they actually did "mark-to-market" (ie, if they actually factored in the probability of the counterparties of their debts and bets actually coming through and paying AXA the full amount it says on the pretty little spreadsheets on everyone's computer screens).
In other words: Like most giant banks and insurers, AXA has mainly debt and bets. They rely on counterparties to pay them - maybe, someday, if the whole system doesn't go tits-up by then.
In other words: Like most giant banks and insurers, AXA does not hold the "private keys" to their so-called wealth :-)
So, like most giant multinational banks and insurers who spend all their time playing with debts and bets, AXA has been teetering on the edge of the abyss since 2008 - held together by chewing gum and paper clips and the miracle of Quantitative Easing - and also by all the clever accounting tricks that instantly become possible when money can go from being a gleam in a banker's eye to a pixel on a screen with just a few keystrokes - that wonderful world of "fantasy fiat" where central bankers ninja-mine billions of dollars in worthless paper and pixels into existence every month - and then for some reason every other month they have to hold a special "emergency central bankers meeting" to deal with the latest financial crisis du jour which "nobody could have seen coming".
AIG back in 2008 - much like AXA today - was another "systemically important" worldwide mega-insurance giant - with most of its net worth merely a pure fantasy on a spreadsheet and in a four-color annual report - glossing over the ugly reality that it's all based on toxic debts and derivatives which will never ever be paid off.
Mega-banks Mega-insurers like AXA are addicted to the never-ending "fantasy fiat" being injected into the casino of musical chairs involving bets upon bets upon bets upon bets upon bets - counterparty against counterparty against counterparty against counterparty - going 'round and 'round on the big beautiful carroussel where everyone is waiting on the next guy to pay up - and meanwhile everyone's cooking their books and sweeping their losses "under the rug", offshore or onto the taxpayers or into special-purpose vehicles - while the central banks keep printing up a trillion more here and a trillion more there in worthless debt-backed paper and pixels - while entire nations slowly sink into the toxic financial sludge of ever-increasing upayable debt and lower productivity and higher inflation, dragging down everyone's economies, enslaving everyone to increasing worktime and decreasing paychecks and unaffordable healthcare and education, corrupting our institutions and our leaders, distorting our investment and "capital allocation" decisions, inflating housing and healthcare and education beyond everyone's reach - and sending people off to die in endless wars to prop up the deadly failing Saudi-American oil-for-arms Petrodollar ninja-mined currency cartel.
In 2008, when the multinational insurance company AIG (along with their fellow gambling buddies at the multinational investment banks Bear Stearns and Lehmans) almost went down the drain due to all their toxic gambling debts, they also almost took the rest of the world with them.
And that's when the "core" dev team working for the miners central banks (the Fed, ECB, BoE, BoJ - who all report to the "central bank of central banks" BIS in Basel) - started cranking up their mining rigs printing presses and keyboards and pixels to the max, unilaterally manipulating the "issuance schedule" of their shitcoins and flooding the world with tens of trillions in their worthless phoney fiat to save their sorry asses after all their toxic debts and bad bets.
AXA is at the very rotten "core" of this system - like AIG, a "systemically important" (ie, "too big to fail") mega-gigantic multinational insurance company - a fantasy fiat finance firm quietly sitting at the rotten core of our current corrupt financial system, basically impacting everything and everybody on this planet.
The "masters of the universe" from AXA are the people who go to Davos every year wining and dining on lobster and champagne - part of that elite circle that prints up endless money which they hand out to their friends while they continue to enslave everyone else - and then of course they always turn around and tell us we can't have nice things like roads and schools and healthcare because "austerity". (But somehow we always can have plenty of wars and prisons and climate change and terrorism because for some weird reason our "leaders" seem to love creating disasters.)
The smart people at AXA are probably all having nightmares - and the smart people at all the other companies in that circle of "too-big-to-fail" "fantasy fiat finance firms" are probably also having nightmares - about the following very possible scenario:
If Bitcoin succeeds, debt-and-derivatives-dependent financial "giants" like AXA will probably be exposed as having been bankrupt this entire time.
All their debts and bets will be exposed as not being worth the paper and pixels they were printed on - and at that point, in a cryptocurrency world, the only real money in the world will be "counterparty-free" assets ie cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin - where all you need to hold is your own private keys - and you're not dependent on the next deadbeat debt-ridden fiat slave down the line coughing up to pay you.
Some of those people at AXA and the rest of that mafia are probably quietly buying - sad that they missed out when Bitcoin was only $10 or $100 - but happy they can still get it for $1000 while Blockstream continues to suppress the price - and who knows, what the hell, they might as well throw some of that juicy "banker's bonus" into Bitcoin now just in case it really does go to $1 million a coin someday - which it could easily do with just 32MB blocks, and no modifications to the code (ie, no SegWit, no BU, no nuthin', just a slowly growing blocksize supporting a price growing roughly proportional to the square of the blocksize - like Bitcoin always actually did before the economically illiterate devs at Blockstream imposed their centrally planned blocksize on our previously decentralized system).
Meanwhile, other people at AXA and other major finance firms might be taking a different tack: happy to see all the disinfo and discord being sown among the Bitcoin community like they've been doing since they were founded in late 2014 - buying out all the devs, dumbing down the community to the point where now even the CTO of Blockstream Greg Mawxell gets the whitepaper totally backwards.
Maybe Core/Blockstream's failure-to-scale is a feature not a bug - for companies like AXA.
After all, AXA - like most of the major banks in the Europe and the US - are now basically totally dependent on debt and derivatives to pretend they're not already bankrupt.
Maybe Blockstream's dead-end road-map (written up by none other than Greg Maxwell), which has been slowly strangling Bitcoin for over two years now - and which could ultimately destroy Bitcoin via the poison pill of Core/Blockstream's SegWit trojan horse - maybe all this never-ending history of obstrution and foot-dragging and lying and failure from Blockstream is actually a feature and not a bug, as far as AXA and their banking buddies are concerned.
The insurance company with the biggest exposure to the 1.2 quadrillion dollar (ie, 1200 TRILLION dollar) derivatives casino is AXA. Yeah, that AXA, the company whose CEO is head of the Bilderberg Group, and whose "venture capital" arm bought out Bitcoin development by "investing" in Blockstream.
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/4k1r7v/the_insurance_company_with_the_biggest_exposure/
If Bitcoin becomes a major currency, then tens of trillions of dollars on the "legacy ledger of fantasy fiat" will evaporate, destroying AXA, whose CEO is head of the Bilderbergers. This is the real reason why AXA bought Blockstream: to artificially suppress Bitcoin volume and price with 1MB blocks.
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/4r2pw5/if_bitcoin_becomes_a_major_currency_then_tens_of/
AXA has even invented some kind of "climate catastrophe" derivative - a bet where if the global warming destroys an entire region of the world, the "winner" gets paid.
Of course, derivatives would be something attractive to an insurance company - since basically most of their business is about making and taking bets.
So who knows - maybe AXA is "betting against" Bitcoin - and their little investment in the loser devs at Core/Blockstream is part of their strategy for "winning" that bet.
This trader's price & volume graph / model predicted that we should be over $10,000 USD/BTC by now. The model broke in late 2014 - when AXA-funded Blockstream was founded, and started spreading propaganda and crippleware, centrally imposing artificially tiny blocksize to suppress the volume & price.
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/5obe2m/this_traders_price_volume_graph_model_predicted/
"I'm angry about AXA scraping some counterfeit money out of their fraudulent empire to pay autistic lunatics millions of dollars to stall the biggest sociotechnological phenomenon since the internet and then blame me and people like me for being upset about it." ~ u/dresden_k
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/5xjkof/im_angry_about_axa_scraping_some_counterfeit/
Bitcoin can go to 10,000 USD with 4 MB blocks, so it will go to 10,000 USD with 4 MB blocks. All the censorship & shilling on r\bitcoin & fantasy fiat from AXA can't stop that. BitcoinCORE might STALL at 1,000 USD and 1 MB blocks, but BITCOIN will SCALE to 10,000 USD and 4 MB blocks - and beyond
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/5jgkxv/bitcoin_can_go_to_10000_usd_with_4_mb_blocks_so/
AXA/Blockstream are suppressing Bitcoin price at 1000 bits = 1 USD. If 1 bit = 1 USD, then Bitcoin's market cap would be 15 trillion USD - close to the 82 trillion USD of "money" in the world. With Bitcoin Unlimited, we can get to 1 bit = 1 USD on-chain with 32MB blocksize ("Million-Dollar Bitcoin")
https://www.reddit.com/btc/comments/5u72va/axablockstream_are_suppressing_bitcoin_price_at/
Anyways, people are noticing that it's a little... odd... the way Greg Maxwell seems to go to such lengths, in order to cover up the fact that bigger blocks have always correlated to higher price.
He seems to get very... uncomfortable... when people start pointing out that:
It sure looks like AXA is paying Greg Maxwell to suppress the Bitcoin price.
Greg Maxwell has now publicly confessed that he is engaging in deliberate market manipulation to artificially suppress Bitcoin adoption and price. He could be doing this so that he and his associates can continue to accumulate while the price is still low (1 BTC = $570, ie 1 USD can buy 1750 "bits")
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/4wgq48/greg_maxwell_has_now_publicly_confessed_that_he/
Why did Blockstream CTO u/nullc Greg Maxwell risk being exposed as a fraud, by lying about basic math? He tried to convince people that Bitcoin does not obey Metcalfe's Law (claiming that Bitcoin price & volume are not correlated, when they obviously are). Why is this lie so precious to him?
https://www.reddit.com/btc/comments/57dsgz/why_did_blockstream_cto_unullc_greg_maxwell_risk/
I don't know how a so-called Bitcoin dev can sleep at night knowing he's getting paid by fucking AXA - a company that would probably go bankrupt if Bitcoin becomes a major world currency.
Greg must have to go through some pretty complicated mental gymastics to justify in his mind what everyone else can see: he is a fucking sellout to one of the biggest fiat finance firms in the world - he's getting paid by (and defending) a company which would probably go bankrupt if Bitcoin ever achieved multi-trillion dollar market cap.
Greg is literally getting paid by the second-most-connected "systemically important" (ie, "too big to fail") finance firm in the world - which will probably go bankrupt if Bitcoin were ever to assume its rightful place as a major currency with total market cap measured in the tens of trillions of dollars, destroying most of the toxic sludge of debt and derivatives keeping a bank financial giant like AXA afloat.
And it may at first sound batshit crazy (until You Do The Math), but Bitcoin actually really could go to one-million-dollars-a-coin in the next 8 years or so - without SegWit or BU or anything else - simply by continuing with Satoshi's original 32MB built-in blocksize limit and continuing to let miners keep blocks as small as possible to satisfy demand while avoiding orphans - a power which they've had this whole friggin' time and which they've been managing very well thank you.
Bitcoin Original: Reinstate Satoshi's original 32MB max blocksize. If actual blocks grow 54% per year (and price grows 1.542 = 2.37x per year - Metcalfe's Law), then in 8 years we'd have 32MB blocks, 100 txns/sec, 1 BTC = 1 million USD - 100% on-chain P2P cash, without SegWit/Lightning or Unlimited
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/5uljaf/bitcoin_original_reinstate_satoshis_original_32mb/
Meanwhile Greg continues to work for Blockstream which is getting tens of millions of dollars from a company which would go bankrupt if Bitcoin were to actually scale on-chain to 32MB blocks and 1 million dollars per coin without all of Greg's meddling.
So Greg continues to get paid by AXA, spreading his ignorance about economics and his lies about Bitcoin on these forums.
In the end, who knows what Greg's motivations are, or AXA's motivations are.
But one thing we do know is this:
Satoshi didn't put Greg Maxwell or AXA in charge of deciding the blocksize.
The tricky part to understand about "one CPU, one vote" is that it does not mean there is some "pre-existing set of rules" which the miners somehow "enforce" (despite all the times when you hear some Core idiot using words like "consensus layer" or "enforcing the rules").
The tricky part about really understanding Bitcoin is this:
Hashpower doesn't just enforce the rules - hashpower makes the rules.
And if you think about it, this makes sense.
It's the only way Bitcoin actually could be decentralized.
It's kinda subtle - and it might be hard for someone to understand if they've been a slave to centralized authorities their whole life - but when we say that Bitcoin is "decentralized" then what it means is:
We all make the rules.
Because if hashpower doesn't make the rules - then you'd be right back where you started from, with some idiot like Greg Maxwell "making the rules" - or some corrupt too-big-to-fail bank debt-and-derivative-backed "fantasy fiat financial firm" like AXA making the rules - by buying out a dev team and telling us that that dev team "makes the rules".
But fortunately, Greg's opinions and ignorance and lies don't matter anymore.
Miners are waking up to the fact that they've always controlled the blocksize - and they always will control the blocksize - and there isn't a single goddamn thing Greg Maxwell or Blockstream or AXA can do to stop them from changing it - whether the miners end up using BU or Classic or BitcoinEC or they patch the code themselves.
The debate is not "SHOULD THE BLOCKSIZE BE 1MB VERSUS 1.7MB?". The debate is: "WHO SHOULD DECIDE THE BLOCKSIZE?" (1) Should an obsolete temporary anti-spam hack freeze blocks at 1MB? (2) Should a centralized dev team soft-fork the blocksize to 1.7MB? (3) OR SHOULD THE MARKET DECIDE THE BLOCKSIZE?
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/5pcpec/the_debate_is_not_should_the_blocksize_be_1mb/
Core/Blockstream are now in the Kübler-Ross "Bargaining" phase - talking about "compromise". Sorry, but markets don't do "compromise". Markets do COMPETITION. Markets do winner-takes-all. The whitepaper doesn't talk about "compromise" - it says that 51% of the hashpower determines WHAT IS BITCOIN.
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/5y9qtg/coreblockstream_are_now_in_the_k%C3%BCblerross/
Clearing up Some Widespread Confusions about BU
Core deliberately provides software with a blocksize policy pre-baked in.
The ONLY thing BU-style software changes is that baking in. It refuses to bundle controversial blocksize policy in with the rest of the code it is offering. It unties the blocksize settings from the dev teams, so that you don't have to shop for both as a packaged unit.
The idea is that you can now have Core software security without having to submit to Core blocksize policy.
Running Core is like buying a Sony TV that only lets you watch Fox, because the other channels are locked away and you have to know how to solder a circuit board to see them. To change the channel, you as a layman would have to switch to a different TV made by some other manufacturer, who you may not think makes as reliable of TVs.
This is because Sony believes people should only ever watch Fox "because there are dangerous channels out there" or "because since everyone needs to watch the same channel, it is our job to decide what that channel is."
So the community is stuck with either watching Fox on their nice, reliable Sony TVs, or switching to all watching ABC on some more questionable TVs made by some new maker (like, in 2015 the XT team was the new maker and BIP101 was ABC).
BU (and now Classic and BitcoinEC) shatters that whole bizarre paradigm. BU is a TV that lets you tune to any channel you want, at your own risk.
The community is free to converge on any channel it wants to, and since everyone in this analogy wants to watch the same channel they will coordinate to find one.
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/602vsy/clearing_up_some_widespread_confusions_about_bu/
Adjustable blocksize cap (ABC) is dangerous? The blocksize cap has always been user-adjustable. Core just has a really shitty inferface for it.
What does it tell you that Core and its supporters are up in arms about a change that merely makes something more convenient for users and couldn't be prevented from happening anyway? Attacking the adjustable blocksize feature in BU and Classic as "dangerous" is a kind of trap, as it is an implicit admission that Bitcoin was being protected only by a small barrier of inconvenience, and a completely temporary one at that. If this was such a "danger" or such a vector for an "attack," how come we never heard about it before?
Even if we accept the improbable premise that inconvenience is the great bastion holding Bitcoin together and the paternalistic premise that stakeholders need to be fed consensus using a spoon of inconvenience, we still must ask, who shall do the spoonfeeding?
Core accepts these two amazing premises and further declares that Core alone shall be allowed to do the spoonfeeding. Or rather, if you really want to you can be spoonfed by other implementation clients like libbitcoin and btcd as long as they are all feeding you the same stances on controversial consensus settings as Core does.
It is high time the community see central planning and abuse of power for what it is, and reject both:
  • Throw off central planning by removing petty "inconvenience walls" (such as baked-in, dev-recommended blocksize caps) that interfere with stakeholders coordinating choices amongst themselves on controversial matters ...
  • Make such abuse of power impossible by encouraging many competing implementations to grow and blossom
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/617gf9/adjustable_blocksize_cap_abc_is_dangerous_the/
So it's time for Blockstream CTO Greg Maxwell u/nullc to get over his delusions of grandeur - and to admit he's just another dev, with just another opinion.
He also needs to look in the mirror and search his soul and confront the sad reality that he's basically turned into a sellout working for a shitty startup getting paid by the 5th (or 4th or 2nd) "most connected", "systemically important", "too-big-to-fail", debt-and-derivative-dependent multinational bank mega-insurance giant in the world AXA - a major fiat firm firm which is terrified of going bankrupt just like that other mega-insurnace firm AIG already almost did before the Fed rescued them in 2008 - a fiat finance firm which is probably very conflicted about Bitcoin, at the very least.
Blockstream CTO Greg Maxwell is getting paid by the most systemically important bank mega-insurance giant in the world, sitting at the rotten "core" of the our civilization's corrupt, dying fiat cartel.
Blockstream CTO Greg Maxwell is getting paid by a mega-bank mega-insurance company that will probably go bankrupt if and when Bitcoin ever gets a multi-trillion dollar market cap, which it can easily do with just 32MB blocks and no code changes at all from clueless meddling devs like him.
submitted by ydtm to btc [link] [comments]

Auto-rate my portfolio : a full analysis of my shilling with some price predictions, from BTC to XMR via NEO.

Every day, someone asks to rate his portfolio or what is the most underrated coin, etc...
Personally, there's a lot of coins that I like while I dislike shilling : pump a coin is not a good strategy, it's usually followed by a dump and I'd rather take a steady growth than a fast one.
I'd like to submit my choices and why I have chosen them. Please, critics are welcomed. Disclaimer : it's gonna be a long post.
BTC : it was obviously my first purchase a few years ago but I have always spent it. Yes, it's been a mistake, I could have be way richer than I am today if I kept them. But it's a currency, isn't it ? Now, I hold most of my BTC and I do think that there's still a lot of room to grow. Segwit implementation is starting to be a success and I hope S2x won't work. Nevertheless, I still think that in order to be more adopted in the future, Bitcoin should be used as a currency and not be held forever. Price prediction : $10K within two years (with some bumps, obviously)
LTC : I have always liked this fork, its quickness, its development. Coblee is one of my favourite guys, I love his honesty and his humility. I think that Litecoin has a chance to be used as a currency and more merchants would be wise to accept it. Price prediction ? 200$ within two years (with some bumps, obviously).
VTC : I have already made some profits with Vertcoin but I have always bought back my VTC. The community is one of the best and there's a lot of interesting techs. Even though I don't really care about ASIC-Resistance, stealth addresses are really useful. Ledger Nano S, Blue and Trezor will be able to store it, an IOS wallet and an Exchange/Wallet are on their way. Pretty cool. Still, I'd like a rebranding (in French, Vert means Green and I don't think this name helps its adoption). Price prediction : 20-30$ within two years
Quick thought : I don't think there will be room for these three coins in the long term (5-10 years) because they are very similar. For now, I think it's safe to bet on all of them.
Neo/Gas : I love the way Neo has been built and this ability to claim Gas is so easy. While I already made profits with Neo, I still think that it's slightly overpriced currently but crypto world is into speculation, right ? Anyway, Neo's leader is one of the most enthusiast and honest guys I have ever read in crypto. The future is promising and I don't think that China will be able to stop it : FUD is just FUD. There's also a connection between Loopring and Da Hongfei and I think it can't hurt for future collaborations. Price predictions ? 70-100$ within two years.
Qtum : if Neo is priced like this, Qtum should be too. Just my two IOTA. I guess that the reputation of its leader played a big part in the mind of potential investors. Still, I don't like being influenced by rumors and he has already addressed this topic many times. If the team succeeds to deliver its roadmap (API release, Springmail, Qloha, oracles), then Qtum could be huge. But I do think that it's a long term project. Price predictions ? 25-40$ within two years.
Quick thought : pay attention that - correct me if I'm wrong - Chinese people are way more interested in Qtum than in Neo, whose community come mostly from Western territory.
Waves Platform : hmmm, I'm a huge fan of Waves and Sasha Ivanov. I bought my first Waves more than one year ago and I'm still accumulating (current price is a bargain). Yeah, I know that a lot of people are not fond of the current DEX but it's an alpha version. A new GUI/DEX is coming. There's already FIAT gateways, Bitcoin, ETH, LTC and Zec gateways, a pretty cool IOS wallet has just been released and the Bitcoin-NG protocol is currently on the testnet and once in the mainnet, it will make Waves faster than most of the platforms. Moreover, more and more projects are planning their ICOs on Waves because it's stable & secure. The connection with Oceanlab (a development team which is very serious and has alreadly delivered solid tools quicky after their ICO) is also promising. Ah, and the trendy buzzword 'smart contract' is also coming. Waves has always been my hidden gem. Price predictions ? 15-70$. It will mostly depend of users adoption. Even though I respect Ethereum a lot, I'd advise people to give a look on Waves. It's user-friendly and most of us are not coders, right ?
Navcoin : Nav is one of my favourite coins out there. First, kudos to the community, humble, cool, genuine. About the coin itself : have you ever sent a transaction with Navcoin ? Wow, it's really, really fast. Anonymous dApps is coming and although I don't know if it will make Nav able to compete with Monero, I think it will make a lot of 'privacy' coins useless (XVG, Zcash, maybe PIVX) and it's way faster than Monero. There's already a FIAT gateway via Changelly available and the team is building a platform in order to buy Nav with FIAT, credit card, Paypal and more. If I sell Nav, it's always in order to buy back. Price predictions : IMO, it should already be 5$ at least (it's 0.8 currently). If people wake up, 10$ within two years.
Ark : maybe I'm wrong, but I think that Ark is already user-friendly and that it's very important to be adopted. The dPOS protocol is really cool, even for a small holder. The Ledger wallet implementation has been done. The team will enable market fees, the voting will be cheaper. The ArkVM to allow users to make smart contracts is on its way. Overall, There's a lot of room to grow and I have never lose any money with Ark. Price predictions ? 10-15$ within two years.
Lisk : I don't think I could talk about Ark without doing the same with Lisk. You all know that rebrand & SDK release are on their way. Then, the Lisk ecosystem should grow a lot. So ? I'm accumulating for the long term. Price predictions ? 10-15$ within two years.
THE DAG CRYPTO
Byteball : yeah, I know Byteball price is falling but like most of you, I got most of mine for free thanks to the airdrop. Finally, airdrops may have hurt the price since a lot of people dumped their bytes right away. Also, I know that a lot of people are fearful of the lack of decentralisation because most of the witnesses are handled by the founder. IMO, it's a false problem : first, bitcoin, litecoin, even ethereum are not so decentralised either in the end. Plus, everyone can be a witness if the desire is here. In the end, I really don't care about this problem which will be solved. I love the byteball system : the transactions are so fast, the wallets (full & light) are so cool with a chatbot, a store, a betting platform with smart contract. It's so well-advanced and yet, the lack of communication doesn't help Byteball. Anyway, I still think that there is a future for byteball. Some merchants have already started to accept it and there is an incentive cashback program for them and the consumers. It's just the beginning. Price predictions ? No clue. But Byteball will forever be in my heart and it should be way higher priced than it is today.
IOTA : like Byteball, the lack of decentralization because of the coordinator or the founder behaviour can frighten people. Again, I don't care : coordinator will be taken off in the future and the founder is just a honest guy who doesn't care about diplomacy. I like that. The tech is awesome, the quickness of the transactions are amazing and there are a lot of collaborations, especially with Bosch. I don't think that people truly understand that IOTA's first goal is not to be used by humans, but by machines. The Internet of things is coming and IOTA has a head start. Price predictions ? 2$ per MIOTA within two years.
ALSO
Monero : what can I say about XMR ? Well, it's truly private. I love privacy. Who doesn't ? I really don't think that any governments are able to stop it. No law has been able to stop Bitcoin, no law will stop XMR. This is the aim of decentralization. And yeah, a lot of people looks Monero as the crime currency. Yet, fiat is the first crime currency and don't forget that Bitcoin used to be looked the same way. Invest into your privacy. Price predictions ? 300$ within two years.
FACTOM : It amazes me how much people talk about crypto adoption and don't see that FCT is already adopted. It's not a project anymore, it's actually used by corporations. "Don't believe the hype", there's no hype with Factom but it's concrete, solid, it's a rock. Invest into the rock. Price predictions : no clue.
CRYPTOPAYMENTS TOOLS
MTL/OMG : I think that these tools will help crypto a lot to be adopted. MTL & OMG teams are solid and well funded. Everybody is criticizing the hype around OMG but it's not really the team's fault. I will be short : both are good projects, one is more oriented towards the American Market, the other towards the Asia. I'm in both. Price predictions ? 20$ within two years ?
My past ICO : Minexcoin / MNX (and not MNC). You should give a quick look on it. I won't develop because it's coming into its first exchange this month and I don't want to "shill it". Just FYI : you have the ability to "park" your coins daily, weekly or yearly in order to earn some rewards. It's like PoS or Waves leasing. https://medium.com/minecoin-blog
My failed bet : Signatum I don't know if it's the end. Maybe it was just a Miner's P&D. Maybe it's not the end and I would be glad because, besides the FUD around the project, it was interesting.
In the end, I won't talk about Ethereum but I'm it too. I just think that ICO's are hurting ETH and it tires me. But I'm in. I'm also in BAT, SNGLS, LRC and NEM/XEM but it will be for another time. I'm also paying attention on XRB, DLT, BIS.
submitted by EmmanuelBlockchain to CryptoMarkets [link] [comments]

Auto-rate my portfolio : a full analysis of my shilling with some price predictions, from BTC to XMR via NEO.

Every day, someone asks to rate his portfolio or what is the most underrated coin, etc...
Personally, there's a lot of coins that I like while I dislike shilling : pump a coin is not a good strategy, it's usually followed by a dump and I'd rather take a steady growth than a fast one.
I'd like to submit my choices and why I have chosen them. Please, critics are welcomed. Disclaimer : it's gonna be a long post.
BTC : it was obviously my first purchase a few years ago but I have always spent it. Yes, it's been a mistake, I could have be way richer than I am today if I kept them. But it's a currency, isn't it ? Now, I hold most of my BTC and I do think that there's still a lot of room to grow. Segwit implementation is starting to be a success and I hope S2x won't work. Nevertheless, I still think that in order to be more adopted in the future, Bitcoin should be used as a currency and not be held forever. Price prediction : $10K within two years (with some bumps, obviously)
LTC : I have always liked this fork, its quickness, its development. Coblee is one of my favourite guys, I love his honesty and his humility. I think that Litecoin has a chance to be used as a currency and more merchants would be wise to accept it. Price prediction ? 200$ within two years (with some bumps, obviously).
VTC : I have already made some profits with Vertcoin but I have always bought back my VTC. The community is one of the best and there's a lot of interesting techs. Even though I don't really care about ASIC-Resistance, stealth addresses are really useful. Ledger Nano S, Blue and Trezor will be able to store it, an IOS wallet and an Exchange/Wallet are on their way. Pretty cool. Still, I'd like a rebranding (in French, Vert means Green and I don't think this name helps its adoption). Price prediction : 20-30$ within two years
Quick thought : I don't think there will be room for these three coins in the long term (5-10 years) because they are very similar. For now, I think it's safe to bet on all of them.
Neo/Gas : I love the way Neo has been built and this ability to claim Gas is so easy. While I already made profits with Neo, I still think that it's slightly overpriced currently but crypto world is into speculation, right ? Anyway, Neo's leader is one of the most enthusiast and honest guys I have ever read in crypto. The future is promising and I don't think that China will be able to stop it : FUD is just FUD. There's also a connection between Loopring and Da Hongfei and I think it can't hurt for future collaborations. Price predictions ? 70-100$ within two years.
Qtum : if Neo is priced like this, Qtum should be too. Just my two IOTA. I guess that the reputation of its leader played a big part in the mind of potential investors. Still, I don't like being influenced by rumors and he has already addressed this topic many times. If the team succeeds to deliver its roadmap (API release, Springmail, Qloha, oracles), then Qtum could be huge. But I do think that it's a long term project. Price predictions ? 25-40$ within two years.
Quick thought : pay attention that - correct me if I'm wrong - Chinese people are way more interested in Qtum than in Neo, whose community come mostly from Western territory.
Waves Platform : hmmm, I'm a huge fan of Waves and Sasha Ivanov. I bought my first Waves more than one year ago and I'm still accumulating (current price is a bargain). Yeah, I know that a lot of people are not fond of the current DEX but it's an alpha version. A new GUI/DEX is coming. There's already FIAT gateways, Bitcoin, ETH, LTC and Zec gateways, a pretty cool IOS wallet has just been released and the Bitcoin-NG protocol is currently on the testnet and once in the mainnet, it will make Waves faster than most of the platforms. Moreover, more and more projects are planning their ICOs on Waves because it's stable & secure. The connection with Oceanlab (a development team which is very serious and has alreadly delivered solid tools quicky after their ICO) is also promising. Ah, and the trendy buzzword 'smart contract' is also coming. Waves has always been my hidden gem. Price predictions ? 15-70$. It will mostly depend of users adoption. Even though I respect Ethereum a lot, I'd advise people to give a look on Waves. It's user-friendly and most of us are not coders, right ?
Navcoin : Nav is one of my favourite coins out there. First, kudos to the community, humble, cool, genuine. About the coin itself : have you ever sent a transaction with Navcoin ? Wow, it's really, really fast. Anonymous dApps is coming and although I don't know if it will make Nav able to compete with Monero, I think it will make a lot of 'privacy' coins useless (XVG, Zcash, maybe PIVX) and it's way faster than Monero. There's already a FIAT gateway via Changelly available and the team is building a platform in order to buy Nav with FIAT, credit card, Paypal and more. If I sell Nav, it's always in order to buy back. Price predictions : IMO, it should already be 5$ at least (it's 0.8 currently). If people wake up, 10$ within two years.
Ark : maybe I'm wrong, but I think that Ark is already user-friendly and that it's very important to be adopted. The dPOS protocol is really cool, even for a small holder. The Ledger wallet implementation has been done. The team will enable market fees, the voting will be cheaper. The ArkVM to allow users to make smart contracts is on its way. Overall, There's a lot of room to grow and I have never lose any money with Ark. Price predictions ? 10-15$ within two years.
Lisk : I don't think I could talk about Ark without doing the same with Lisk. You all know that rebrand & SDK release are on their way. Then, the Lisk ecosystem should grow a lot. So ? I'm accumulating for the long term. Price predictions ? 10-15$ within two years.
THE DAG CRYPTO
Byteball : yeah, I know Byteball price is falling but like most of you, I got most of mine for free thanks to the airdrop. Finally, airdrops may have hurt the price since a lot of people dumped their bytes right away. Also, I know that a lot of people are fearful of the lack of decentralisation because most of the witnesses are handled by the founder. IMO, it's a false problem : first, bitcoin, litecoin, even ethereum are not so decentralised either in the end. Plus, everyone can be a witness if the desire is here. In the end, I really don't care about this problem which will be solved. I love the byteball system : the transactions are so fast, the wallets (full & light) are so cool with a chatbot, a store, a betting platform with smart contract. It's so well-advanced and yet, the lack of communication doesn't help Byteball. Anyway, I still think that there is a future for byteball. Some merchants have already started to accept it and there is an incentive cashback program for them and the consumers. It's just the beginning. Price predictions ? No clue. But Byteball will forever be in my heart and it should be way higher priced than it is today.
IOTA : like Byteball, the lack of decentralization because of the coordinator or the founder behaviour can frighten people. Again, I don't care : coordinator will be taken off in the future and the founder is just a honest guy who doesn't care about diplomacy. I like that. The tech is awesome, the quickness of the transactions are amazing and there are a lot of collaborations, especially with Bosch. I don't think that people truly understand that IOTA's first goal is not to be used by humans, but by machines. The Internet of things is coming and IOTA has a head start. Price predictions ? 2$ per MIOTA within two years.
ALSO
Monero : what can I say about XMR ? Well, it's truly private. I love privacy. Who doesn't ? I really don't think that any governments are able to stop it. No law has been able to stop Bitcoin, no law will stop XMR. This is the aim of decentralization. And yeah, a lot of people looks Monero as the crime currency. Yet, fiat is the first crime currency and don't forget that Bitcoin used to be looked the same way. Invest into your privacy. Price predictions ? 300$ within two years.
FACTOM : It amazes me how much people talk about crypto adoption and don't see that FCT is already adopted. It's not a project anymore, it's actually used by corporations. "Don't believe the hype", there's no hype with Factom but it's concrete, solid, it's a rock. Invest into the rock. Price predictions : no clue.
CRYPTOPAYMENTS TOOLS
MTL/OMG : I think that these tools will help crypto a lot to be adopted. MTL & OMG teams are solid and well funded. Everybody is criticizing the hype around OMG but it's not really the team's fault. I will be short : both are good projects, one is more oriented towards the American Market, the other towards the Asia. I'm in both. Price predictions ? 20$ within two years ?
My past ICO : Minexcoin / MNX (and not MNC). You should give a quick look on it. I won't develop because it's coming into its first exchange this month and I don't want to "shill it". Just FYI : you have the ability to "park" your coins daily, weekly or yearly in order to earn some rewards. It's like PoS or Waves leasing. https://medium.com/minecoin-blog
My failed bet : Signatum I don't know if it's the end. Maybe it was just a Miner's P&D. Maybe it's not the end and I would be glad because, besides the FUD around the project, it was interesting.
In the end, I won't talk about Ethereum but I'm it too. I just think that ICO's are hurting ETH and it tires me. But I'm in. I'm also in BAT, SNGLS, LRC and NEM/XEM but it will be for another time. I'm also paying attention on XRB, DLT, BIS.
submitted by EmmanuelBlockchain to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Blue Beelzebub (Final)

Link to Part 1
Link to Part 2
Mortaren’s appointment had left a slim window through which to prep. As a freelancer, I was free to travel across the country or the world for a story, so time off from work wasn’t an issue that vexed me. I opted to fly to Denver then drive I-25 to Walsenburg - a city to the east of the San Luis Valley and a spot my travels made familiar over the years. By week’s end, after a numbing but uneventful commute, I reached the comfort of my hotel days in advance - I wanted that buffer to breathe and to reconnoiter the site of our meeting.
The coordinates pointed to a site too remote for satellites to remap every year. Neither Google nor Bing ever sent cars there to photograph the area. The drive through US-350 was monotonous - mile after mile of farmland parched a uniform yellow. The only excitement, if such were the word, came from the prompts the GPS indicated which eventually took me onto a gravel road.
The route crossed a railroad. To my right was a farm. To my left was the overlook - a weathered and wizened hump of earth a geologist told me had been the remnants of a butte millions and millions of years prior. It stood by itself amid seas of grassy plains. A road lurched onto its peak; there the earth had been pressed into a level (and empty) lot. It felt like the safest place to stop, (hopefully), out of sight and out of mind.
My rented Wrangler was the sole vehicle at the overlook.
For a while I gazed westward. The sky was a vibrant shade of blue that smothered the distance. Across its haze I caught outlines of the Spanish Peaks. I let my eyes wander southward, toward that spot at the horizon where US-350 vanished into a point. I couldn’t see a car anywhere coming or going. A train roared as it approached from the side of the highway.
Eastward and below - at what I gauged may have been a spur of the historical Santa Fe trail, I noted the ruins that had drawn me onto that spot. It had escaped my eyes when I drove by it and then, then I realized why. It was at the top of the overlook that the effect was appreciable. The ruins, through the years, had been smothered to its roof by an orchard of junipers.
The ruin was that of a two-story house which had been built partially into the ground. I gawked at the style of it for it appeared so out of time, so out of place when compared to the architecture typical of the area around La Junta. The closest match was Spanish Colonial. The eeriest aspect of it was that in spite of the juniper’s swallowing it, it didn’t look like it had been abandoned for any lengthy period of time.
I approached the door - a slab of wood impressively resilient to weather - and stuck my head into the shadow beyond its yawning threshold. Its walls were tagged with an eclectic mixture of symbology, some of it Satanic, some of it native. Others defied my erudition.
As I grew bold enough to enter, my advance was stopped by a voice.
“Yeah, figured you’d check it out.”
“Mortaren?” I turned to face the orchard, whose miasma cloaked the figure. “Wanted to see it for myself. Doesn’t strike me as a place to stash a server.”
“Exactly.”
Mortaren, my erstwhile host, stepped out of the enshadowment and joined my stance at the door’s threshold. I sensed by the immediate familiarity he conveyed to the structure that he wasn’t a stranger to its curiosity. I followed into the abode and almost immediately choked at a waft of putrefaction - urine and feces from sources unknown. Squatters - or worse - I started to suspect may have sought the refuge of its confines. Still, Mortaren was not concerned.
Nor was he curious about the freshly-minted tools strewn about the rubble. Gear that I recognized from my years of hiking had been folded into the mess as if to disguise it. I detected, too, the odor of gasoline - faintly and sublimely - as if it were a suggestion stirred by the train that passed by.
“It hasn’t been a residence since the seventies.”
“Well if that’s so, it’s a mix-up.”
“No! Little of the sort, bub, this,” he said of it, swinging a finger around his head toward the upstairs, “this is the spot. Everything that happened, happened here. All of that was filmed where we stand. ZuZu or whomever they worked for, they chose this site not for the way it looked outside but inside. Then ZuZu embedded those clips of it into the code.”
“Is it booby trapped?”
“In a manner of speaking.”
We worked past the foyer and the library that followed it. We walked: Mortaren at the front and I at the back. Could it be doubted anymore? My host splayed intimate knowledge of the abode which could have come only from a personal investigation. How many times had he stopped by? Perhaps he more than stopped by? Perhaps he more than investigated.
We entered a wide, tall hallway and paused. The chamber was pitch except for a window at the apex of the stairs which blasted a square-shaped spotlight onto the floor at our feet. Behind us the hallway emptied into a kitchen. Light that filtered through its windows lent it a vibrant, green glow. A glow that came from the vegetation clogging that chamber. I noted flickering, whistling lights like fluorescents out of view but not of earshot.
Mortaren refused my help to unroll a tarp; “touch nothing, nothing - don’t leave a print anywhere, kiddo, you gotta trust me, OK”. He revealed a set of tools: pliers, machetes, rakes, and a crowbar. My host took the crowbar and aimed it at the stairs. “Let me give you a word of warning - if you insist you want that game - alright more, more than a word. Yes - I got it. And I’m far from the only sucker, let me say. I suggest, whatever you do, you don’t ever install it, you don’t ever play it, you don’t even stick it into a drive that autoplays, OK?”
We ascended; the stairs were droopy and I struggled to stay upright.
“Not saying that ‘cause of what it’ll do to your rig - you know what it’ll do, I don’t need to tell you what it’ll do. It’s the sort of stuff that’ll bring the FBI to your door faster than you can say Blue Beelzebub. No, damn it, it’s how that abomination tears into your soul. It’ll compromise you and that’s intentional not accidental. It wants to beat you into submission. The fear - that you’ll be found, that you’ll be trapped - imagine every day, every day thinking ‘today’s the day it happens’. It took a year to convince the FBI I didn’t know what that game was about and then it was too late to save my arse.”
Upstairs, my host drew my steps into a chamber whose walls were a faded memory of yellow. Cracks formed like veins running the heights of the walls. The reek of corruption, like that of decay, attacked us fiercely. A hum issued out of the air; it was strongest at the center where the rug that cloaked the floor bulged.
Mortaren applied a streak of coroner’s salve to his upper lip. I added a dab to my face. My host insisted I should be thorough; so I complied.
The chamber was a formal salon, a pit of “opulence and decadence” for the 70s. Furniture lay scattered to rot. An armoire, as tall as the salon, waited at the far end with its doors wide, agape almost like arms outstretched to greet us. It, like the rest of the furniture, soaked the elements and charred into onyx as if burned. Slowly my eyes accustomed to the ambiance and as such I grew cognizant of a trove of esoteric details. Books strewn about. Mounds of salt. Blobs of candles. Pentagrams. All of that competed head-to-head with the scratches etched into the walls.
I found a fingernail embedded into those scratches....
“After I posted the demo, a fan - let’s say they were a fan - contacted my office about it. They offered assistance and I, reluctantly out of curiosity - I complied. I sent them copies of the game. That was my downfall, kiddo.” He stopped to take a breath. “Imagine it. The stuff of nightmares that destroys a man’s life fits so perfectly into a pair of three point five inch floppies. Well, that fan reverse-engineered the executable. Dude sent everything right back to my house with a stack of paper. Never heard of them again. I assumed they were the first to contact the FBI. Can’t blame ‘em.”
Mortaren pointed to the rug that spanned the floor.
“Is that hum under the floor?” I asked - he nodded.
“The sound isn’t from the server, though.” Mortaren lifted the corner of the rug with the crowbar. We cleared the furniture and rolled away the carpet. It decomposed into rubble just by touching it as we did. “It’s a crazy layout. The house was built over a shaft. This room it’s, it’s right over that shaft. The hum comes from the way air works through it.”
“So ... the server is real and it’s here?”
My host nodded; “The game’s cloak and dagger - a virus that turns your rig into a zombie. You work for them, now, now, you’re part of something worse than anything you imagine. The events that created this mess, this wreck that you see - it was filmed right where we stand. ZuZu transferred the footage to AVI clips and used it to create the maze’s layout and texture. My fan, when they broke apart the game, they found the clips embedded right into the code and I had to watch ‘em, didn’t I? I had to watch ‘em. Look, it’s not over, OK. The ritual they started, it doesn’t end, it doesn’t, ever, end.”
I dared not ask what kind of ritual it was. The gaze of his eyes as they relived the video spoke volumes. His whole entire body shook as if the violation were fresh.
“I tell you the strangest part of this business. The people who started it, they’re a crazy kooky sex cult out of NAZI Germany. Yeah, they used Crawley’s sex-magik. They never touched kids, though. It wasn’t about the Cheese Pizza for ‘em. But the Chinese Sandwich wasn’t any better.”
We walked into the center of the salon, to a spot where the rug had bulged. Removed, we saw what it was. A circle had been drilled into the wood and plugged by plate like a manhole.
Mortaren lodged the crowbar into the crack at the circumference of the plate.
“You’ll never get it until you see it from their perspective. Twisted as it is. You gotta see it through their eyes. The game exists to re-create the ritual - to recreate the ritual and make you part of it. Simply by watching it, by playing it, you get tainted and that by itself makes you part of it. Damn it.” He tapped the crowbar to the plate that refused to budge. “Haven’t I tried? It’s not enough, is it? Am I too old, at the end? The server.... It’s at the end of the shaft, a hundred feet below. I donno how it’s powered. Maybe it’s geothermal? I donno. It’s there, idling, watching and waiting for a signal to awaken. It’s what sustains the game and the spreads the ritual. It’s the heart of the beast.”
###
Cheese Pizza and Chinese Sandwich, to those not aware of 4CHAN and its vernacular, is code for ‘Child Pornography’ and ‘Child Snuff’, respectively. ZuZu and LVN used the dog-whistles of their day to advertize the game to a certain clientele. But the cult that bankrolled Blue Beelzebub abhorred the former as it embraced the latter. And the game itself contained tedious 90s shock - glimpses of death and its like - it never showed the goods, so to speak.
The CD contained the augmented DOS the game installed as well as a thorough, documented unraveling of the game itself. Mortaren’s fan discovered and saved BMPs and AVIs that had been embedded into the code. I slipped that CD into a drive and scanned its contents with my virus and malware checkers. Not a single program detected a problem. Given the sizes of the files, though, I found it disconcerting that my checkers took minutes to complete.
Mortaren’s fan had placed their deconstruction of the game’s executable into a ZIP folder. The majority of it consisted of code that they converted from binary to ML to C. It was fascinating to gawk as the code which appeared so professional. Yet, as C was not a strength of mine, I found it vague and cryptic overall.
I dug into the multi-media directory and extracted images and clips that had been stored there. Saved to my laptop, I selected the largest AVI and played it. That film, whose sights and sounds were equally vivid and jittery, oozed the impression of an 8 mm production. It had been subbed in German and I (mostly) followed it.
Mortaren got it right - the clip had been filmed at the house by US-350, specifically, at its salon. I paused to check the layout and compare it to my notes of how I found the furniture and the other, macabre ancillary. Amazingly, decades after the fact, everything matched.
###
The clip itself comprised a continuous stream formed of what had to have been a sequence of shorter segments:
1irst Segment:
At a couch sit three women - an older, frailer matron flanked by younger versions of herself. They chat with the cameraman (I assume).
2econd Segment:
The matron walks out of the frame and the cameraman pans to the opposite side of the salon where a man approaches the couch. The man is dressed in a style similar to that of Crowley’s regalia - decked head to toe with shades of violet and onyx. The magik-man approaches the couch with the women and offers them leis that they take and wear.
3hird Segment:
The matron reappears, followed by a pair of Amazonian-like natives - they were naked but their bodies were painted. The lei’ed women at the couch rise as the matron introduces them to the natives. It’s at that juncture that the cameraman reveals the women, too, have been painted. Neither men’s or women’s paints are native-like; rather, the runes are straight out of Thelema.
4ourth Segment:
The magik-man sits at the rug between a pair of circumscribed pentagrams. The magik-man lights a roll of sage (?) - the lack definition masks the identity of the object. Smoke billows out of it as he waves it over the pentagrams. The matron sets lights and sets six candles - three to the left and three to the right of the magik-man.
5ifth Segment:
The cameraman drifts down and to the left, down and to the left, down and to the left, to reveal the orgy. Painted men and women are paired and writhe about the pentagrams. The males lay with their backs to the floor and their heads crowned by the candles. The females lay atop the males. Their limbs intertwine. Their bodies contort. All to the rhythm of the magik-man beats into a drum.
6ixth Segment:
The matron, naked and painted, sits in front of the magik-man and extends a chalice.
7eventh Segment:
The magik-man pours the content of the chalice onto a loaf of bread. The cameraman zooms into that bread - it is shaped like a baby. At that instant the hands of the males and the females, their paint smeared and mingled post-orgy, reach onto the bread and yank it into four-quarters. They eat the bread.
8ighth Segment:
The magik and camera men remain at the salon; it’s night, it’s lit by torches.
They peel away the rug and reveal a circular portal into a shaft.
For a while the magik-man speaks to the cameraman. Subtitles state: “we consecrate the well - are you ready to see it again - to see it as it is enlivened by the spirit of [REDACTED] spurred by the ritual - are you ready - do you think you are ready”, then, “it looks like a hundred feet”, then, “as if a hundred feet were enough”.
9inth Segment:
The bulk of the video consists of the exploration of the mine at the base of the shaft. The magik-man takes turns, sometimes leading, sometimes lagging, always speaking although the German is not translated throughout this segment.
The pair reaches a part of the maze that collapsed. Although their posture is merely suggested by the aim of the camera, the pause and the silence that follows indicate that they are not ready for the obstacle and so struggle to clear a way through it. The viewer notes by the appearance of their hand that the cameraman is at last captured by their own footage.
The pair works through the collapse and discovers a vast, circular chamber.
The chamber is lit, awash by an eerie, hazy blue light. A crack crazes across the chamber. The light filters through that crack. The cameraman savors the chamber - it’s adorned like the salon; it’s a site where the cult practices its rituals. The cameraman sweeps toward the crack, prompted by a sound that startles the magik-man.
The cameraman zooms into the crack - it’s like a well, filled to the brim with water. It’s almost like an abyss, it sinks on and on hundreds if not thousands of feet; the limitations imposed by the film and the pixilation cannot do the reality any justice.
The water is upsettingly transparent through and through - and straight into the blur of light at whereever its bottom lay.
As the magik-man speaks off-screen and the cameraman continues their zoom, it’s apparent that there are things, things of a sort not floating but swimming through the water.
I scream as the view jostles - it is not a jump or a cut, though, it is the cameraman’s shake. Whoever it is that films that site, they had been startled by movement elsewhere. As the camera’s view twists to the side, it pans by where the magik-man stands and captures a glimpse, just, a glimpse of something that had been standing at the other side of the chasm right as it jumps into the water.
###
The house off US-350 loomed abandoned in appearance only. Nobody occupied it since the 70s; however, it was not derelict. County records verified that its owners - Ache Industrias, SA - paid its taxes year after year. Ache Industrias, named for a tribe of South American natives, was a company from Paraguay famous for its advances (and patents) re: GMOs. They were a partner to Monsanto but not as known outside of agriculture. Ache Industrias owned that house and the farms that engulfed it; a total of 500 acres.
BM: “Word is that the company wants to use this land for research.
“A lobby out of Denver, that represents a lot of cattlemen, filed a lawsuit working its way into the Supreme Court at this rate.” Farmers and ranchers who would be, effectively, neighbors, sharing their grazing rights of the nearby Comanche Grasslands objected to the idea, fearing the consequences to their business if their livestock mixed with the GMO livestock.
“Meanwhile the acreage isn’t dormant; it’s rented and reaps a lot of profit from royalties.”
Ache Industrias wasn’t the first owners, or, as it should be stated, wasn’t the first incarnation of the first owners.
BM: “An occultist, Straniak, was its proprietor of record according to my contacts from Brazil.”
Straniak, in partnership with two other expatriated Germans, formed a company c. 1930 then known as Straniak-West. Although the exact nature of Straniak-West wasn’t advertised, it’s suspected that they profited from the Chaco War and the partners became wealthy in spite of the Great Depression (which had been a world-wide phenomenon). As Europe verged into WWII, Straniak-West changed its moniker to Ache Industrias c. 1940. Around the tail end of 1941 the partners bought a thousand acres around the La Junta area; about half of the original estate was shed through the years.
BM: “Straniak and cohorts summered at their Colorado estate. Right up until they started to rent the land, the house had been the estates only, permanent structure. They used its solitude to mask their rituals.”
The cult / company was especially fond of that house and guarded its secrets.
Mortaren, as an aficionado of the occult, a passion that spurred him to review games of that genre, became aware of Aleister Crowley and the Thules, chieftains of bizarro early 20th mysticism, strands of which wormed their way into the works of Lovecraft, Blackwood, and a slew of other writers.
Straniak, and allies, German mystics intimately linked to the Thules, “a society with their own weird take on Aryanism” whose forays into sex-magik, blood-magik, and sacrifices made them too extreme even for the NAZIs.
“He fled to South America before Hitler, if you believe that sort of stuff.”
The house wasn’t built by Straniak and Co, though. It already existed by the time they hired a crew to survey their property c. 1933.
That area of Colorado had see-sawed between Spain and France before it was ceded to the US after the Mexican-American. Records from two centuries ago were hard to come by. Historians were reduced to combing through diaries and correspondences, however, the ephemera revealed a portion of history that otherwise had been lost.
The house used to be part of a hacienda granted to a patron of great wealth. Disagreements arose re: their identity as the sources used to piecemeal the history were themselves uncertain if the figure was American / English or French. Nevertheless, they built an extensive estate c. 1792. The house used to be larger; an earthquake c. 1820 reduced it more or less to the dimensions that Straniak & Co. found it.
What probably enticed the occultist crew was what legends claimed had been revealed after the earthquake. Namely - that the house had been erected over a mine from prehistory. The earthquake, as it leveled the house, revealed a shaft into that mine – which so happened to contain gold. Tthe patron used its revenue to rebuild the house - albeit to modest proportions - with the novelty that the house hid or capped the entrance into the mine.
BM: “The cavity underfoot itself isn’t the end-all and be-all. The cult was attracted to something else, something else not connected to wealth. Is it a portal into another realm? I donno what but it called to them and they poured resources into it.
“They recorded all of their rituals; the climax of which, which became Blue Beelzebub, if my timeline’s correct, matches an earthquake in 1983. It wasn’t much of an earthquake but it explains part of the video. It ripped a gash through the system. The server’s got to be inside that chasm, drawing power from geothermal. A system designed to work for ages without intervention while their poison spreads through the internet. Ah, but it won’t be there for long, I promise you.”
Night cloaked the house as we descended its rickety, tilted staircase. It felt as if the structure somehow, someway gained a sort of sentience after decades of mysticism echoed through its confines. I fancied it understood Mortaren’s intentions and shook at the foreknowledge.
If it goes, won’t that destroy the evidence? What about the crimes they committed? Won’t they go unpunished?
BM: “Altruism, don’t deny it, kiddo.”
My erstwhile host was adamant about their business and refuted my pleas to reason otherwise.
By destroying the house, they claimed, they would be saving lives, lives yet to be taken.
BM: “Kiddo, you’re talking about people, people who will never be punished never, never, never be punished for anything. Blue Beelzebub, it’s just the tip of the tip of the iceberg. And you know it. It’s always like that. They regroup and reorganize. But they took me down. And I’m gonna take this much, this much if anything away from them. Mark my words, they’ll imagine another way to entrap kids and spread their filth. And that’s where you and those like you continue what I start tonight.”
###
A stark midnight moon loomed to the south west over the jagged peaks of the Sangre De Cristos. There wasn’t a cloud to mar the sky. Crisp, summery wind stirred a floral scent about the air, then it faded, driven away to the ether by a tide of gasoline then of a char / smoke. I drove by the orchard where I noted how the orange escaped the house. It almost looked like a face, a skeletal face, buried into the junipers. I waved. Maybe the gesture was or wasn’t returned. I didn’t stay.
That was the last I saw of Bobby Mortaren.
I dismantled the laptops’ HDDs; I scraped the platters then I applied a welder’s torch to them, fusing them, melting them, obliterating any trace what so ever of the data they contained. Later I shredded the floppies and the CD and the papers. For all I knew those may have been the last, extant copies of Blue Beelzebub.
My paying job resumed its malaise although I noted that my contacts with the FBI waned. Then my editors shuffled my workload. Cases I had been assigned to were re-directed elsewhere. Leads dried. I was shunned more and more. I could not help but recognize a familiarity to the pattern - to the way I was being isolated and overshadowed. I tried to squash the paranoia that may have transferred to me as I entertained the notion of starting yet another career.
Little had been reported about the explosion south of Timpas that night.
I eked out a single article about the decline and fall of bitcoin. After that I put my thoughts together to form this record of my dealings with Blue Beelzebub. Partly to settle the history of it - as much of it as I understood. Partly to form a defense. I wanted to be transparent; there’s such scant cover for journalists nowadays.
Earlier I received a call from a woman, a former FBI agent who claimed they owed me a favor.
They warned that “I had been flagged by an anti-virus software vendor that works with the government”. Apparently, the anti-virus / malware scan had detected a rare item and reported it to the vendor’s server for analysis. That’s how the NSA discovered “the executable” with “embedded content” that “raised eyebrows”. It wasn’t just the government that started to investigate Blue Beelzebub, they continued, “a third party, a cryptic South American outfit”, long suspected of trafficking and exploiting minors, “sparked a lot of chatter across the deep-web about you. You got enemies, son, lots and lots of enemies.”
I didn’t know of any FBI agent, current and / or former who “owed me a favor”. I stated that in fact I had received a couple of floppies from a source familiar with the game. Naturally, I scanned the media. “I couldn’t get the program to work properly. It needs DOS and there aren’t too many PCs like it anymore. I destroyed all of that ‘cause it gave me the creeps.”
It wasn’t entirely a lie.
submitted by 0fruitjack0 to nosleep [link] [comments]

[Table] IAmA: We are scientists working at CERN, home of the Large Hadron Collider and birthplace of the World Wide Web! Ask Us (Almost) Anything!

Verified? (This bot cannot verify AMAs just yet)
Date: 2014-06-10
Link to submission (Has self-text)
Questions Answers
How much political input/interference is there in your work? Given that so many nations contribute funding, does conflict ever arise in regards to what you can do? There is fortunately no political input/interference in our work, and this is regardless of our origine or anything. What we do is just pure science! (nm)
Does the name Okabe Rintarou ring a bell? SteinsGate, if I am not wrong. But we don't do time machines yet. Ask me again yesterday, if this has changed in five years.
(sl)
How much hooking up goes on between the scientists at CERN? Please rate on a scale of "Frostier than Elsa's Ice Palace" to "Sexy Cheerleader Camp group cabin" What I can tell is that there is an intense social life at CERN which I would call inbred: the community at CERN is somewhat special ... Long hours spent at the lab, sometime a geeky attitude, does not favor contacts outside CERN ... end result: I know a lot of people who have found their companion within the community. (TC)
Do you guys do anything classified? CERN is an academic environment and we take lots of efforts to publish results, technical designs, etc. We do not do any military research. Therefore, there is few stuff being "classified". Sometimes, there is a period when we keep information internal until we are sure the results are correct. Thus, basically, you find only the "usual" classified stuff at CERN: payslips, medical records of our employees, passwords, financial information.
(sl)
That and your time machine research. Oh. Yes. But that has been handed over to SERN.
(sl)
What does it sound like when you turn it on? (Seriously) When we close the LHC after access, the access console beeps. when we send out timing events to synchronise the equipment, we have an announcer that speaks out a line, that recalls what happened.
For the rest, the control room is far from the equipment, so we don't really hear it... but colleagues told me that at the ISR (another accelerator at CERN), they could hear the beam being dumped with a low pitch boom :) (gp)
Would it be technically or bureaucratically difficult to install microphones to record it next year? We have had microphones installed, to listen to the sound of an asynchronous dump on the collimators :) (gp)
What discovery/research should be getting more publicity than it is? We are doing a lot of research which does not get onto the blogs/newspapers: we have published more than 100 scientific papers on major peer reviewed journals.
Such papers are all about measuring the way Nature works at fundamental level. Today this kind of fundamental research can only be carried out in laboratories like CERN and it is our role to exploit such tools to provide mankind with these measurement which could be the basis of the future 'revolution' in understanding the inner workings of Nature. (TC)
What is each of your's favorite work of fiction involving CERN? I personally love the big bang theory. I can offer a free tour of the LHC control room for authors and actors if they come over to Geneva. (gp)
Bruno Arpaia's "Energia del Vuoto' : I have read the original italian book..do not know if it has ever been translated. (TC)
What common misconceptions do people have about your work i.e. black hole makers? What range of qualification and experience do you and your colleagues have? Common misconceptions are the widely advertised black-hole maker thing, but also the fear of us developing new dangerous 'stuff' (the fact that CERN is doing sub- nuclear research adds to the confusion). Another common misconception on the positive side is to think that we might develop the solution to the energy problems of the world. (TC)
What is the most mind-boggling thing you have learned or experienced in your time working there? Diversity of cultures and being able to work with some of the most brilliant minds has been ( and still is after having been at CERN for 28 years) one of the things I consider a unique feature of CERN. (tc)
Do you have any advice for an undergraduate Physics student aspiring to one day work with you at CERN? Sure! Join CERN as a summer student (too late for this year, I fear) but what about 2015? You'll get hands-on at CERN: weeks of lectures in the morning by professionals, hands-on projects within different CERN groups on your favorite subject, and lots of networking and socializing in the evenings. Meet your peers from all over the world. Sign up here.
(sl)
I'm a physics undergraduate and I'll be making the move to Geneva to work at CERN for a year as a technical student in 2 weeks! I'm extremely excited. Great! That'll be definitely fun! Wheather is sunny 30degC. Hope that stays!
How's the weather over there? (sl)
Im educated in this field nor smart enough to really understand but i'd love to spend a summer there as a 40 year old summer student. Age does not really count. I have just seen a 40yrs old applicant to our Technical Student programme. But you would need to be enlisted with an university...
(sl)
What is the coolest thing you've ever had the chance to do in your work at CERN (besides smashing particles together, of course)? I love LEGO. When Google came around and was taking footings of the CERN Computer Centre for their Google Streetview, I had a chance to drop a few LEGO minifigs beforehand. Later we made a treasure hunt of it... Was quite fun. If you want to try yourself, go here. If you want to cheat, solutions are here.
(sl)
How often are you guys able to predict what discoveries you will make? For example, when you found the Higgs Boson there had already been predictions that it would be found at some point in time, as our technology improved. Are there any other examples of less well known, expected, breakthroughs and does the accuracy of these predictions vary from the different areas of research? It is a good question: the way we work is by theorist assembling the information that we , experimentalists, make into models. Such models besides explaining what we have already observed make also predictions which we try to verify ( the HIggs boson is a notable example). In terms of 'how often' this is the most common situation we are dealing in our daily research life.
There are many other questions ( like why there is an obvious asymmetry between matter and antimatter) where the model builders and the experimentalist are trying to bootstrap each other with continous progress in understanding.
And there have been times where experimentalists have surprised the theorists by discovering new particles which nobody had foreseen ( example the tau lepton) (TC)
How close are you to unifying gravity and quantum mechanics? Not very close yet... This is a big area of research, many people are working on it, there have been some progress already but still a lot of work is needed. (nm)
How do you all decide what projects to study and work on? Are you pretty much given free reign? Is it based on budgetary constraints or what could have profitable applications? Is there someone in charge who gets to say "Hey, we should do more research into black holes" or whatever? As theorists, we are free to work on the projects we wish, depending on what we think more interesting or needed. Experimentalists however have also predecided projects to work on depending on the program and preiorities of the collaborations. We also have sometimes common projects between theorists and experimentalists. (nm)
I am a computer science graduate and will complete my masters next year. besides software engineering my other field of interest is physics. what kind of projects do i embrace so i can one day work at CERN with you? Computer science is everywhere at CERN! The massive amounts of data collected by the physics experiment must be filtered, transferred and stored. "Big Data Analytics" is a good start here. High bandwidth networking another. Mass storage (>100PB/year) a third.
Within the CERN openlab we work with third parties on such research --- so if you want to fiddel with hardware come here.
If you love software design, there are lots of opportunities, too: developping applications to run the LHC, to serve our physicist community, etc.
In brief: Make your field of interest a hobby and sign up as a student with CERN! A good master is an excellent start, but hands-on experience you just can get on the job.
(sl)
I've come to CERN for my master thesis in telecom engineering, as a technical student, I worked on optical links for CMS. I did also my PhD at CERN, in digital microelectronics. now I am hired as an applied physicist and work in the LHC control room. There is a very wide range of options here!
Definitely look at the student programs! (gp)
How strong is the firewall in CERN computer system?Does hacker often try to pringe into CERN sytem? Q: What is the purpose of a firwall? A: To let traffic through. If we don't need to let traffic through, we would cut the cable...
We use a standard firewall configuration to control traffic. As we serve a world-wide community, there are hundreds of computing services open to the Internet: web servers, SSH gateways, Windows Terminal Servers, conference room booking systems, document stores, web mail servers, etc...
Like any other organization worldwide, these are permanently probed for weaknesses. We monitor this activiely and, so far, successful attacks (detected by us ;-) have been rare.
(sl)
rare. The usual stuff: web site defacements, stealing/collecting credentials, using CERN as a platform to hop further, misusing computing power for Bitcoin mining, ...
Could you give an example of what happened when a hacker succeeded? I can't imagine there's much trouble a hacker could cause for you guys... (sl)
What do you hope to see happen within physics within your lifetimes? Is there a particular piece of the puzzle that you want solved for closure? There are many puzzles! One of the most intriguing ones though is the nature of dark matter. (nm)
What is it like to work at CERN? Schedules, workloads, commutes, social lives, etc? I love working here, the research and the international environment in particular. my schedule is messy when we have beam, as I take shifts in the control room. the rest of the time, it's normal working hours - which sometimes get extended in case of deadlines that come up.
I live, as many others, close by, so commuting is short (10 minutes). this June many of us are doing bike2work - so I biked in today, the weather is beautiful. my personal interests fit in well also. skiing is close by in between Swiss and French Alps, and the Geneva yoga festival is great too.
(gp)
What are you most excited to see happen in the near future concerning your respective fields of research? I can't wait to see the beam at high energy, early next year. on the accelerator side, we have a few things that might cause issues that we'll have to work on: electron clouds in the beam pipe, Unidentified Falling Objects, beam instabilities, … it'll be fun! (gp)
Finding new particles that could confirm the predictions of the theories I am working on! That will allow us to finally know what is the correct direction to go beyond the Standard Model of particle physics! (nm)
Comic Sans. Why Comic Sans? Because "Arial" sucks, doesn't it?
(sl)
How much does your electric bill average each month? A figure I heard is that we use ~180MW on a good day… most of it taken by the accelerator complex. (gp)
Is there a secret duplicate LHC, like they did for the machine in the movie Contact, in case some crazy-ass incident occurs? No! (nm)
Whats the process of decieding which particles you smash together? do you just take random shit and throw it together or are there scientific reasonings for it? Concerning the LHC, it was designed to do proton-proton, and lead-lead. then we also did proton-lead, and lead-proton, which is less obvious that what it sounds like.
I guess what I want to say is that it depends on the physics goals.
(gp)
Whats your favorite part out using scientific linux, or worst part? Btw, pretty cool that cern has adopted linux for research! I take the chance to point to this picture… I'm in it and the captions are not 100% true. (gp)
What impact will funding have on future research? Today's fundamental research is based on tools which require investment (that has always been the case , but in the past this funding was at the level of individual research institutes or of national initiative). Today not even 'continental' investment can cope with the needs of fundamental research. So if we want to progress further there will be need of substantial investment. For example in the last 12 months it has been decided to exploit fully the potential of the LHC accelerator :in order to exploit the potential of the improved accelerator we will need improved detectors. These do not come for free ...
So yes, funding will be essential for fully exploiting what the LHC accelerator can tell us ( and that might be a lot ... as there a lot of unaswered questions like what is dark matter, why is our universe made of matter and so on ) (TC)
So, now you have the higgs. what's next? We have to measure all the Higgs properties as precisely as we can! We also have new models to go beyond the Standard Model of particle physics and there are active searches ongoing at CERN to look for new particles. (nm)
It seems like lots of students are (appropriately) wowed by CERN and go on to pursue advanced degrees in HEP-ex and HEP-th. Do you think there is a real risk of overcrowding the field? The field has been 'regulating' its market since ever: we have statistics showing that less than 40% of the PHDs formed in CERN experiments remain in the Academic/Research world. The rest find quickly their way into the 'outside' world. The main reasons we have identified for the popularity of our students are : not being afraid of trying to solve problems, no matter how difficult, ability to evolve in a multinational/multicultural environment, ability to work in large teams, being exposed to state of the art software/electronic techniques. (TC)
What would make the LHC look like old tech in the near future? I'm guessing not a "larger" one. And don't forget the newest idea: the FCC (gp)
As the group that helped develop the web, what is your opinion on the current issues of Net Neutrality and the NSA's use of the Internet to spy on citizens of the world? Some personal view: The World Wide Web created 25 years ago at CERN (WWW: “Let’s share What We knoW”) provided a global platform and unique opportunity for people to communicate, to collaborate and to share at unprecedented scale and speed. The accessibility and openness of the internet are crucial to enabling new ideas to flourish and compete with the long-standing traditions and to ensure that the evolution of the web continues to proceed at a pace limited only by our ideas. However, with this capability comes considerable responsibility with all of us – whether politicians, lawmakers, scientists or citizens – to preserve an open internet and a free web for the benefit of humankind.
(sl)
How close are we towards a GUT? Is their some technical aspect holding us back or is it something else? No, I would say we have to verify the GUT model predictions experimentally at the LHC and there are ongoing searches... (nm)
Stefan Lüders, "Head of Computer Security" Actually, I followed a typical CERN career-by-chance. I am educated physicist, turned into control system engineer, investigated security stances of control systems, and then joined the security team with what I learned. Most of the time, I coordinate implementations, provide guidance, and help people to make their products more secure. It's more facilitating and enabling than hard-core security. However, my team consists of white hats who know the techniques much better than I do :-)
I didn't know CERN hired security experts, what does your job entail mostly? For the supa hacka, I would love to learn how he/she would get world domination by hacking into CERN. Sounds like bad reconnaissance...
Also, a more humorous question... are any of you afraid of being hacked by a "supa hacka" who is aware of your schemes and desire for world domination? John Titor 2014. (sl)
Any advice for a high school student trying to get into physics and particle physics in specific? Study hard and keep your eyes open for scholarships (gp)
How long does a test last? And how long between these tests? At the LHC, from a beam dump to the next stable beams it takes at least 2 hours. then we keep the beams in collisions for up to 10-15 hours. then start over. at the experiments, they pack up data from the collisions for years. (gp)
I'm sure you experience work-related pressures and irritations like the rest of us, but you're doing a very special job. Have you ever had a particularly satisfying moment that reminded you, "this is why I work here?" First turn of the beam in the LHC in 2009 - my fifth day on the job. I looked at my boss and whispered: "thanks for hiring me". (gp)
Is there any concept in physics that you look at and think "what the heck is going on here?" Yes ..all the time when confronted with the subtleties of Quantum Mechanics..and every time I dig into it I keep learning more (TC)
What are some (interesting) questions you can't answer? There are many, and that's why we do research! A few examples: how to explain the matter-antimatter asymmetry. Or what is dark matter. Or are there more than 3 quark/lepton families? And many more! (nm)
Please explain what you mean by "dumping the beam when it's depleted". This sounds like something that is required after a jump through hyperspace, and sounds very interesting. The beam gets dumped whenever it is not interesting for physics anymore (and the operators decide to extract it), or whenever anything on the accelerator side goes wrong (and Machine Protection takes care of extracting it automatically).
By means of a special set of magnets, with very fast rise times, the beam gets extracted from the main ring to a special place, the beam dump itself, where it hits a huge block of graphite and scatters its energy.
(gp)
Last updated: 2014-06-14 10:45 UTC
This post was generated by a robot! Send all complaints to epsy.
submitted by tabledresser to tabled [link] [comments]

Sixteen ideas to save Western civilization

Idea one

Rather than funding a Darwinian triathlon that leaves thousands of people dead every year, in which those young men who are best capable of jumping fences, swimming through rivers and crossing deserts are given a ticket to paradise, we declare today that no more refugees will be given entrance into Europe. Instead, every Euro that is currently spent on providing shelter and care for refugees in Europe, will be used for refugees in their country of origin. With a guarantee that there is not a snowball's chance in hell of being granted asylum in Europe, the refugee stream to our continent will plummet. This will allow those NGO's who currently spend their money transporting people from Libya to Italy, to spend their scarce resources on helping refugees where they actually live. The cost of providing for one refugee in the Netherlands is 20 to 40 times higher than providing for the same refugee in his country of origin.
The moment we change our policy towards refugees, towards one based on rational sanity, is the moment we can start taking care of twenty to forty times as many of them. This will be necessary in the years ahead, as climate change, soil erosion and overpopulation will create a refugee crisis the likes of which humanity has never seen before. How about highly skilled refugees? You might ask. The thing is, those refugees will be the people who will be needed to rebuild the countries they fled from. If they live here, they can't help rebuild the communities that were destroyed.

Idea two

Europe is faced with a demographic crisis, as our fertility rates are very low. There are many different solutions to this, but one solution I have not heard before is as following: Let the height of our child benefits payments depend on the average age of the population of a municipality. The government should be paying people in rural communities to have children. Many of these communities have conservative Christians, who would be quite willing to have more children if they could afford to raise them. What we don't want, are child benefit payments going to overpopulated cities. What we need is for people to migrate from cities to our dying villages and for people living in those villages to have more children.
Our cities are home to our underclass, people who are unable to make something out of their life, often due to hereditary problems. Schizophrenia is twice as common in the cities for example. The people who live in cities tend to be descended from the rural peasants who were unable to make a living in the countryside. This is unfortunate, but it is the reality we have to deal with. What we want is for children to be born in the best possible conditions to guarantee a happy life. This is a conclusion I have reached, by virtue of the fact that I was born into the urban underclass myself. I want children to be born with more opportunities than I had. This tends to be very difficult to understand if you're born into a wealthy or middle class family.

Idea three

We don't just have to implement repatriation subsidies for migrants who live in Europe. In fact, we should implement broader emigration subsidies. We have more young men than young women, while Russia, Ukraine and the Baltic states have more young women than young men. The fertility rates of Europe as well as Russia would go up if we sent men to Russia. Ideally, Russian would be a language that's taught in high school here.
We also have millions of citizens in our continent, who yearn for more diversity and feel disgusted by the sight of a homogeneous European community. Europe to them is a racist monolithic continent and they worry greatly about the plight of Africans. What better way to help them achieve their dreams, than by paying them to migrate to Africa, a continent full of multicultural countries, where everyone speaks a different language and has unique customs? Everyone benefits from this. Africa desperately needs skilled people, while Southern Europe is full of young unemployed people. A gender studies, sociology or cultural anthropology degree is useless here in Europe. I'm sure it can be quite useful in Africa however.

Idea four

When it comes to income, women want to marry up, men want to marry down. If women can't find a man to marry with higher status than themselves, many simply refuse to marry and never reproduce. This is a big problem, because young women right now tend to earn more money than young men. There's a reason for this: Discrimination. White working class boys are least likely to go to university. These boys are not all stupid, but the culture they live in makes it difficult for them to succeed in life. In fact, the kind of long-term investment that college represents, is one that these boys who grew up in unpredictable insecure circumstances do not find appealing. In addition, white working class boys are not very interested in listening to long tirades about how they are guilty of everyone else's long history of suffering.
The problem we need to understand, is that education is now not used by employers as a requirement because the skills taught are relevant. No, educational requirements are used by employers to filter out dumb and unreliable people. The effect this has is to favor women over men, giving women an unfair advantage on the labor market. Neither women nor men benefit from women having an unfair advantage on the labor market. Besides the fact that a woman might not be better suited to the particular job she got by virtue of her college degree, women don't benefit from living in a society where there are no men whose salary can deliver them a similar standard of living as their own.
If we were to make it illegal to discriminate against the uneducated, we take away the unfair advantage women have over men. Certainly, we don't want uneducated people to become doctors, nuclear power plant operators or air pilots, but we really don't need people with four year college degrees to carry out mid-level office work for us. Another good measure to use is to hide the gender and name of a candidate for a position. Studies show that people prefer to hire women over men. In practice, being a good looking young woman is an enormous unfair advantage on the job market, for the simple reason that middle-aged men in management positions think with their dick.
What happens when college education can no longer be used as a status indicator by employers, is that a big part of the incentive to go to college disappears. As a result, eighteen year old boys and girls can simply apply for a white-collar job, rather than first having to spend four years studying some particular subject they'll never make practical use of again. What this means is that people are able to become mature much faster than they do today. A person aged 25 might feel ready to have children because they have been saving money for years, whereas today a 25 year old is still paying off their college debt and feel frightened by the thought of having children.

Idea five

Implement a big progressive tax on private land ownership, unless the land is covered in trees. Most of the land in Scotland is owned by a few private individuals, who just have massive herds of animals that eat the land bare. Scotland used to be covered with trees, all that's necessary for the trees to grow back is for the herds of animals to be removed. When we implement progressive taxes on land ownership, farmers who produce a lot of food with little land will find their business more profitable, while farmers who waste a lot of land will find their business to be costly. As an example, mushrooms farms use very little land, to produce a lot of food. Cattle pastures on the other hand, use a lot of land to produce hardly any food. When land ownership costs money, land can no longer be used for blind speculation. As a result, the property bubble should start to deflate. This is highly needed, because the young are now unable to buy houses because of the ridiculous prices we're dealing with. Those of us who can buy houses are afraid to do so, because prices could crash fifty percent and we would become prisoners in our own homes. If you're 65 or older, a decline in prices might suck, but you don't have a strong need to relocate anymore. Because we're unable to buy houses, we're unable to start families.

Idea six

Most of the people in our prisons have double passports. A simple wise solution would be to give prisoners a choice: Renounce your citizenship of our country, in exchange for release from prison. Let Morocco, Turkey and other countries handle these people. When these people choose to move back to their country of origin, it creates an incentive for their families to move back too. What about those prisoners who have just a single passport? Offer them a reduced sentence, depending on where they're willing to sit out their sentence. As an example, you could cut a prison sentence by 25%, if the prisoner is willing to be imprisoned in French Guyana. By the time they are released, they might simply stay there.
Another option that is very important is euthanasia. Prisoners need to have the right to choose to end their lives. Some people consider the death penalty inhumane. I consider sticking someone in a concrete box for twenty years to be far more inhumane myself. Most have no real chance of building up a meaningful life after they're released. There are actually a large number of prisoners and former prisoners who insist that the death penalty is more humane than a prison sentence, because our society treats former prisoners as second class citizens.

Idea seven

Implement a big tax on the use of our air space. Any plane that passes through our air space will have to cough up large amounts of money. This is great, because air travel has to be disincentivized. Most importantly, it increases the expenses of people who own private jets, which are a complete waste of our society's scarce resources. Currently, Americans charge roughly 30 dollar per 100 kilometer to people passing over their land surface. This is negligible. Try multiplying that rate by ten and see how much people still travel by airplane.

Idea eight

The Netherlands has the highest petrol taxes in the world. This is fantastic. The whole world needs to follow our example. Why? Because oil eventually runs out, so it's better that we prepare for it by encouraging a transitioning away from cars, rather than being caught by surprise. "But China and India!" Joe Sixpack proclaims. I don't care. Let them do what they want to do. If they want to create a big fossil fuel dependent economy, let them go ahead. By the time we run out of fossil fuels, their economies will implode. I think we similarly need a big tax on anyone who has more than a single car registered on his name.

Idea nine

Implement a constitutional amendment, requiring elected heads of state to have children. Why? Most of our political elite doesn't have children. If you don't bother to provide your own contribution to the future of our society at an individual level, why should I expect you will manage to do it at a collective level? What if our head of state is gay? He needs to find himself a wife who doesn't shave her legs, use his imagination, lie back and think of England. People used to make sacrifices for their community.
What investment in the future does a childless leader have? He's a parasite, who ultimately expects other people's children to pay for his retirement. Donald Trump is forced to listen to his daughter, who understands that climate change will prove to be a real problem. If you raised children, your interests align more closely with the interests of the next generation, who are ultimately the people who are carrying the torch of civilization forward. If physiological problems prohibit you from having children, adopted children count too. The kind of person who doesn't want to raise children is the kind of person I don't trust ruling over a country.

Idea ten

Charles Galton Darwin was probably first to propose this, but it can't be said enough: We need to make foreign aid dependent upon a nation's population control efforts. Look at this map of abortion laws to understand what's going to cause us problems in the years ahead. Countries that legalize abortion should receive priority in all of our dealings with them.

Idea eleven

We need to bring this new cold war with Russia to an end. I know, they don't allow gay pride parades. Deal with it. If the people of the world are going to have a place to live, it's going to have to be Russia. Russia, Greenland, Canada, Alaska, these are the kind of places where humans will survive a century from now. We need to be planning ahead for that future, rather than fighting each other over petty cultural differences. Why have we been fueling a bloody civil war in Syria since 2011? It's the greatest waste of human potential in recent history.

Idea twelve

We can simultaneously improve our diet, reduce climate change, heal the ocean and give most of the world's land surface back to nature. It's explained here. China, Korea and Japan produce 88% of the world's seaweed right now. Why are we, in Europe, North America and Oceania not contributing? The solutions exist to our problems, but we're not applying them.
Throw subsidies at mushrooms, seaweed and shellfish. Eventually, you'll get the public to switch their diet and you can begin abandoning most of the world's surface.

Idea thirteen

Happy societies are societies with plenty of young people and few old people. Particularly, it's important to have more young women than mature men. When the population is growing, war is common and life expectancies are low, this is easy. The fact of the matter is, that it's simply not a lot of fun to be old. In addition, old people have to be cared for by young people. We could kill all the old people, but I don't think anyone's looking forward to that.
What I would suggest instead is that we work on getting rid of aging. "What, are you suggesting immortality?" No, I'm suggesting we've got our priorities wrong. Life expectancy at age 65 was 13 years for women in 1930, 21 years in 2010. So, the average retired woman will have eight extra years of life. This is fine, but why is so much money spent on keeping people alive longer? How about we shift our priorities towards keeping people young longer? It's possible to increase the number of eggs a woman has. Dehydroepiandrosterone is effectively used to gradually increase a woman's egg count over the months, until a woman who was infertile is fertile again. This was discovered, not in a state of the art laboratory. It was discovered by a woman who had difficulty conceiving and decided to start experimenting on herself.
What kind of quality of life do you have as an 80 year old? Not a lot. What kind of quality of life do you have as a youthful looking fertile woman? Quite a lot. I know that I'm eventually going to die, so dragging it out doesn't matter much to me. If you can increase the percentage of time that I spend youthful on the other hand, I'm all ears. The best method we have to accomplish this currently seems to be the use of senolytics, substances that kill senescent cells, which are cells that have grown old and prohibit younger cells from reproducing (kind of like the babyboomers). The senescent cells do this by creating speculative housing bubble- err secreting substances that cause inflammation. Senolytics are the equivalent of a suicide bomber who only targets golf courses and cruise ships.

Idea fourteen

Why do we have massive office complexes everywhere? Most people can do their work from home. We soon won't need all the roads we have today either, because we will have self-driving cars. Self-driving cars don't need vast distances between vehicles due to our mediocre human reflexes. In addition, they can more easily share multiple passengers. We won't need all this parking space we have now either. Because people will be able to work from home and order products from home, we will need far less travel too. It's thought we can reduce the number of cars needed from 245 million, to just 2.4 million, through self-driving cars. That's not a typo, it's a 99% reduction.
Technology renders humans obsolete, we say. I think we're not thinking this through clearly enough: Technology renders technology obsolete. If we can use Bitcoin as a store of value, demand for gold declines. If demand for gold declines, we don't need gold mines. We don't need televisions anymore, we're using our computers now for that. Most people don't need a desktop computer, they can do just about everything with a smartphone or a laptop. Paper production has peaked, most of it is now used for packaging. If our population peaks, we don't need to build new houses. Colleges? You can study from home.
The city is full of space we won't need in the future. Parking garages are a thing of the past, companies will rent an office for two hours a week to hold a meetup. What are we going to do with all of that space? We can use it to grow food. A Dutch company grows mushrooms of the non-magical variety in an old swimming pool. If we grow food locally, it won't need packaging.
So what happens next? Minimalism. If we're wise we will live like Sadhus. What else will we not need? Houses. If you can work from home and video-conference your colleagues if you don't want to show up to a meeting, or receive a basic income and don't really have a formal job, why would you want to own a house? You can simply rent a house for a night through AirBnB. You don't really need to own anything. A lawnmower? There's always someone in your street who has one and you can earn money online by renting yours out. Ideally, you wouldn't even have your own clothing. At any moment, 90+% of my clothing goes unused, just like most cars go unused.
What do you think this is? Fully automated communism. What causes it? The free market. It's American free market capitalism, run by right-wing libertarians like Peter Thiel, that destroyed the taxi companies and the hotels. Some of the Silicon Valley tech startup guru's don't own anything other than a smartphone. Isn't it ironic? The Chinese and the Russians pursued communism and accidentally ended up with capitalism. We pursued capitalism and accidentally gave birth to communism.

Idea fifteen

What's the biggest problem in the Middle East today? Endless pointless violence. What causes this endless pointless violence? A small minority of men who monopolize the women and indoctrinate everyone with hateful ideologies. This is sufficient to get the young men to sign up for whatever idiotic millenarian group happens to run their town. The only reason the Middle East can function the way it does, is because everyone is sober. Alcohol and other psychoactive substances are forbidden. There's a simple reason for this. Sexual repression is difficult to sustain in a culture with access to alcohol. Alcohol makes people promiscuous, because it reduces inhibition. Psychedelics can make people promiscuous too, because psychedelics make you lose faith in authoritarian structures altogether and reduce your fear of death.
But how do you keep those substances away from people, in a world where you can order them anonymously on the internet? The government looks for heat from the light used when it wants to find indoor cannabis plants. But how will that work, when you have yeast that can produce THC? Don't even get me started on Psilocybe mushrooms, which you can grow in your own house using little other than a glass jar and some wheat bran. And what do you think happens when people can order abortion pills and euthanasia drugs off the internet? These authoritarian structures have no future. Islamist fundamentalism is a temporary blip on the radar, that will be followed by an implosion of Islam. The bloodshed of ISIS has alienated an entire generation of young Muslims, who now realize that consistently applying Islamic laws doesn't solve anything but merely makes the misery worse.
Studies show that Psilocybin mushrooms are increasingly commonly consumed, because the information on how to grow them is available everywhere. And those who take the mushrooms, report improved mental health. We haven't even begun to scratch the surface of the various substances out there and how they interact. How long do you think the taboo on cannabis will last when it becomes indisputable that use by the elderly prevents dementia? How long do you think the taboo on Salvia will last? Salvia treats opioid addiction, Americans can't afford to maintain the taboo.
What I am proposing here, is a psychedelic renaissance. Our culture is on the verge of shifting towards one where people will have no desire to dominate, but merely yearn to spread love, happiness and compassion. This is a cultural state shift, the likes of which we haven't seen in centuries. It can happen and it won't have to be limited just to the Western world. It can spread around the globe in the same manner as most of our great cultural innovations have.

Idea sixteen

When do we begin to comprehend that we're eating the wrong things? When you're staring with your microscope at the particular genes of a piece of lettuce so that you can geneticaly engineer it to be resistant against a common mold, does it never occur to you that if your crop is plagued by an endless list of pests, you might need to consider eating something else? Why do we have factory farms when the Southern United States are plagued by feral pigs? Why can't rednecks make a living selling the feral hogs they shot? Why do we eat chickens who can't walk, when our pastures are plagued by millions of geese?
"It's not cost-effective" Your government will say. And the reason it's not cost-effective is because you won't let it be cost effective. You create legislation that favors the big guy over the small guy and allow supermarket conglomerates to conquer the globe. Only big farms in England that own sufficient land can apply for farm subsidies, while small farms that make efficient use of their land can't qualify. You force people to leave their small towns and migrate to massive cities. You place subsidies on animal fodder like corn and allow people to bottom trawl the oceans and feed the fish to factory farm animals because they harvest so much fish they have no idea what to do with it. You artificially destroy oyster reefs that people use to gather wild oysters, because the oyster farmers feel threatened. It's not cost-effective because you're scared to death of what happens when it does become cost-effective!
Sunchokes grow like weeds here in the Netherlands, I grow them in a bucket as I can't plant them in my soil as they'd take over everything. And yet, our diet is built around potatoes. The average Dutch potato has residue of 36 different pesticides. People think we're innovative, but that's nonsense. We have change forced upon us, but we refuse to adapt to nature. We'd rather watch everything go to hell than to adjust to the conditions we live in. We seem to insist on having the most bland unhealthy diet imaginable, produced in the most inefficient method imaginable. Now that it's becoming difficult to sustain, we're planning on the next insanity: GMO crops. Rather than adjusting to nature, we'll come up with a crop of our own that produces its own pesticides. Whatever genetic diversity still remains in a crop is lost when the farmers switch to GMO crops. As a result, GMO crops don't solve anything, because the real problem we're dealing with is a lack of genetic diversity in our crops.
I envision a future where everyone grows his own food, not as sterile monocultures but a variety of crops grown together, while mushrooms grow in office towers and seaweed is brought in from the ocean. You'll live in a tent and travel around, following the feral pigs, deer and camels. When people tell you civilization has collapsed, you wouldn't notice the difference. You'd be too happy to care either way.
submitted by sourdoughbreadmaker to accountt1234 [link] [comments]

My analysis of the imminent fed interest rate announcement

This has got nothing to do with bitcoin, but my intended audience is you guys... people who had the ability to see past the crap, forward thinking people.
So in a few hours the fed will make their announcement on whether or not to raise the interest rates. My prediciton is they will raise it with big fanfare...
  1. even though they secretly know they cannot raise it and
  2. they will raise it to TRY and convince the market that everything is just rosy and wonderful in the economy.
The canary in the coal mine is the bond market (the whole market, not just junk bonds). The disparity between the bond market and the stock market is growing bigger by the day. This exact same shit happened just before the 2008 crash. Then, moving over to just the junk bonds (high yield/high risk for investors hungry for profit) are also defaulting on their obiligations at record rate. I'm sitting on the edge of my seat waiting to see if they took note of this.
Now, just about every country in the world has most of their debt denominated in USD. All countries in the world currently owes 263% of the entire worlds GDP (last time I checked, about 2 weeks ago). GBP... what a dumbass measurement... because Gross Domestic Product is not the same as "Income taxes raised to pay for that debt". In the time I grew up economists all agreed: a country should not have more than 20% of their GBP in debt. Notice how that "20%" number correlates to the average tax rate of most countries? Funny how that just flew out the window.
When the rates are raised later today two things will happen.
  1. All these countries will now have to pay that extra .25% on huge amounts of debt that they already struggle to pay.
  2. The USD Index will climb (because you know... a rate raise shows a strong economy, hence the higher index). They will have to use more of their own (now weaker) currency to pay of those debts.
These countries are already struggling under the weight of their debt, and a rate raise will give them a double wammy.
So, to give you an idea: Here is america's Top 10 exports for 2014:
Machines, engines, pumps: US$219.8 billion (13.6% of total exports) Electronic equipment: $172.4 billion (10.6%) Oil: $155.6 billion (9.6%) Vehicles: $136 billion (8.4%) Aircraft, spacecraft: $125.2 billion (7.7%) Medical, technical equipment: $85 billion (5.2%) Gems, precious metals, coins: $64.1 billion (4%) Plastics: $63 billion (3.9%) Pharmaceuticals: $44 billion (2.7%) Organic chemicals: $42.3 billion (2.6%) 
Who is going to buy this stuff from America when governments, hospitals, airlines and the general public the world over cannot afford these things anymore? What' worse is... those numbers above do not reflect profits, this is the gross export total as far I as know. http://www.worldstopexports.com/united-states-top-10-exports/2001. (And for those with inquisitive minds, check out China's Top 10 http://www.worldstopexports.com/chinas-top-10-exports/1952)
Then, the last part of my prediction:
Things will unravel very quickly after the raising of rates. I predict it will get so bad that the fed will turn interest rates negative within three months, or start a war with Russia, which BTW has shown zero "Russian Agression".
(Sidenote: Putin has followed every international law, every rule. The Crimean people did things "The American Democratic" way, you know, that “Our way of living” America fights wars over, and voted themselves to be part of Russia. This was was a great move since Ukraine is finished/done/wasted with 50% inflation. When I grew up voting was considered democracy, funny how this too is now somehow taboo, and labelled "aggression". The West denounced the referendum, but critical thinkers will say: If the vote was faked, why aren't people in Crimea super upset and protesting. Seriously... google/youtube it! The same baseless shit they've been spewing out about bitcoin is the exact same baselss shit they spew out about Russia. http://www.buzzfeed.com/maxseddon/french-lawmakers-visit-crimea-pose-with-a-shirt-t
"Over these two days we saw that there is no occupation, no armed men, people are free,” Mariani told reporters. “This is a peaceful region and people here live freely and happily."
Oh... you're happy? Screw you. You excercized your democratic right? Screw you. We're going to impose completely baseless sactions to an already very fragile worldwide economy! Even Italy is saying this is BS. http://www.thelocal.it/20151210/italy-stalls-extension-of-sanctions-against-russia
And guess what, the same plane that carries around the american president is now in trouble because of the BS sanctions http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/international/business/fate-of-uss-iconic-boeing-747-jets-lies-in-hands-of-russias-airbridgecargo/articleshow/50178748.cms )
Either way, my prediction doesn't really matter because
  1. If they raise rates - bitcoin might show a slight drop, and then a big increase in 3 months time
  2. If they keep it the same, signalling that all isn't as rosy as the talking heads have been saying... bitcoin will rise.
  3. They might just short circuit the whole thing, get it over and done with and just DROP the rate by 25 basis points, get true ZIRP, shock the markets like never before, in which case a lot of people will wake up, buy bitcoin, and cause the price to rise.
How do I do that "remind me in 3 months" thing again?
submitted by CryptoNucleus to btc [link] [comments]

Is Bitcoin (BTC) Mining Worth It In March 2019?Profitable Or Not Profitable? By Far The BEST Bitcoin Mining Software In 2020 💸Profitable💸 Bitcoin Mining in August 2018 - Still Profitable? - YouTube Why Bitcoin Cloud-mining is not profitable anymore Is BITCOIN MINING Profitable RIGHT NOW In 2020?

almost by 20 percent.This change seems significant and the difficulty drastically grows when every 2016th block is mined (which happens every month or two). The data, which shows how long it takes to mine a Bitcoin in 2016 and how long it takes to mine a Bitcoin in 2017, is not really relevant anymore since now it is significantly more difficult to mine BTC. At the dawn of Bitcoin, mining didn’t require many efforts, but was not very profitable as well What will happen when 21 mln Bitcoins are mined? As we know, the Bitcoin supply is limited to 21 mln units. 17 mln Bitcoins have already been mined. The rest 4 mln coins are expected to be mined by 2029. Global supply of Bitcoin will reach its limit unless the protocol is changed. According to ... But bitcoin by design is coded in a way that when mining is not profitable anymore the difficulty drops making possible for new miners to start mining again. While some people are scared of a “mining death spiral”, I’m ecstatic that we’re getting some great data that proves how beautiful Bitcoin’s difficulty adjustment is and that it works as designed. Very important for long-term ... Mining Bitcoin by yourself is not profitable, but renting out your hash rate could be, and mining other cryptocurrencies could also be profitable. Leaving me with an answer of maybe. Footnotes *Note that revenue is based on actually mining a bitcoin. If you mine by yourself you gain either nothing or an entire Bitcoin (and the vast majority of the time you'll get nothing). If you join a large ... In case mining is not profitable anymore, there’s no requirement of selling equipment. With some great benefits, there are certain disadvantages as well: No fun to use; Always exposed to fraud; Opaque mining operations; Contractual warnings; Lack of control; Best Bitcoin Cloud Mining Providers

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Is Bitcoin (BTC) Mining Worth It In March 2019?Profitable Or Not Profitable?

Let’s talk about bitcoin mining in 2019. Is bitcoin mining profitable in 2019? We will discuss the bitmain antminer S17 pro, The INNOSILICON T3-50T BTC Miner, the Asicminer 8 nano s 58 the as ... Is Bitcoin Mining Profitable Right Now In 2020? This video examines 6 different bitcoin miners and all of the factors related to them to help you determine if mining will work for you or not. Bitcoin mining farms and warehouses and how much they make by mining bitcoin on there bitcoin mining rigs or asics. If you want to learn more about btc mining a link to a E-book is down below! Since the rise in difficulty for mining bitcoin, the cost to mine cost more than the payout received. SUBSCRIBE TO FOLLOW MY JOURNEY IN CRYPTO!!!! NEW VIDEOS EVERY OTHER DAY!!! ️ Sign up for ... GET FREE STOCK AND BITCOIN: http://share.robinhood.com/jareds7 Subscribe to the TechCashHouse to learn everything you need to know about bitcoin, bitcoin new...

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