Bitcoin send alert code · GitHub

Zano Newcomers Introduction/FAQ - please read!

Welcome to the Zano Sticky Introduction/FAQ!

https://preview.redd.it/al1gy9t9v9q51.png?width=424&format=png&auto=webp&s=b29a60402d30576a4fd95f592b392fae202026ca
Hopefully any questions you have will be answered by the resources below, but if you have additional questions feel free to ask them in the comments. If you're quite technically-minded, the Zano whitepaper gives a thorough overview of Zano's design and its main features.
So, what is Zano? In brief, Zano is a project started by the original developers of CryptoNote. Coins with market caps totalling well over a billion dollars (Monero, Haven, Loki and countless others) run upon the codebase they created. Zano is a continuation of their efforts to create the "perfect money", and brings a wealth of enhancements to their original CryptoNote code.
Development happens at a lightning pace, as the Github activity shows, but Zano is still very much a work-in-progress. Let's cut right to it:
Here's why you should pay attention to Zano over the next 12-18 months. Quoting from a recent update:
Anton Sokolov has recently joined the Zano team. ... For the last months Anton has been working on theoretical work dedicated to log-size ring signatures. These signatures theoretically allows for a logarithmic relationship between the number of decoys and the size/performance of transactions. This means that we can set mixins at a level from up to 1000, keeping the reasonable size and processing speed of transactions. This will take Zano’s privacy to a whole new level, and we believe this technology will turn out to be groundbreaking!
If successful, this scheme will make Zano the most private, powerful and performant CryptoNote implementation on the planet. Bar none. A quantum leap in privacy with a minimal increase in resource usage. And if there's one team capable of pulling it off, it's this one.

What else makes Zano special?

You mean aside from having "the Godfather of CryptoNote" as the project lead? ;) Actually, the calibre of the developers/researchers at Zano probably is the project's single greatest strength. Drawing on years of experience, they've made careful design choices, optimizing performance with an asynchronous core architecture, and flexibility and extensibility with a modular code structure. This means that the developers are able to build and iterate fast, refining features and adding new ones at a rate that makes bigger and better-funded teams look sluggish at best.
Zano also has some unique features that set it apart from similar projects:
Privacy Firstly, if you're familiar with CryptoNote you won't be surprised that Zano transactions are private. The perfect money is fungible, and therefore must be untraceable. Bitcoin, for the most part, does little to hide your transaction data from unscrupulous observers. With Zano, privacy is the default.
The untraceability and unlinkability of Zano transactions come from its use of ring signatures and stealth addresses. What this means is that no outside observer is able to tell if two transactions were sent to the same address, and for each transaction there is a set of possible senders that make it impossible to determine who the real sender is.
Hybrid PoW-PoS consensus mechanism Zano achieves an optimal level of security by utilizing both Proof of Work and Proof of Stake for consensus. By combining the two systems, it mitigates their individual vulnerabilities (see 51% attack and "nothing at stake" problem). For an attack on Zano to have even a remote chance of success the attacker would have to obtain not only a majority of hashing power, but also a majority of the coins involved in staking. The system and its design considerations are discussed at length in the whitepaper.
Aliases Here's a stealth address: ZxDdULdxC7NRFYhCGdxkcTZoEGQoqvbZqcDHj5a7Gad8Y8wZKAGZZmVCUf9AvSPNMK68L8r8JfAfxP4z1GcFQVCS2Jb9wVzoe. I have a hard enough time remembering my phone number. Fortunately, Zano has an alias system that lets you register an address to a human-readable name. (@orsonj if you want to anonymously buy me a coffee)
Multisig
Multisignature (multisig) refers to requiring multiple keys to authorize a Zano transaction. It has a number of applications, such as dividing up responsibility for a single Zano wallet among multiple parties, or creating backups where loss of a single seed doesn't lead to loss of the wallet.
Multisig and escrow are key components of the planned Decentralized Marketplace (see below), so consideration was given to each of them from the design stages. Thus Zano's multisig, rather than being tagged on at the wallet-level as an afterthought, is part of its its core architecture being incorporated at the protocol level. This base-layer integration means months won't be spent in the future on complicated refactoring efforts in order to integrate multisig into a codebase that wasn't designed for it. Plus, it makes it far easier for third-party developers to include multisig (implemented correctly) in any Zano wallets and applications they create in the future.
(Double Deposit MAD) Escrow
With Zano's escrow service you can create fully customizable p2p contracts that are designed to, once signed by participants, enforce adherence to their conditions in such a way that no trusted third-party escrow agent is required.
https://preview.redd.it/jp4oghyhv9q51.png?width=1762&format=png&auto=webp&s=12a1e76f76f902ed328886283050e416db3838a5
The Particl project, aside from a couple of minor differences, uses an escrow scheme that works the same way, so I've borrowed the term they coined ("Double Deposit MAD Escrow") as I think it describes the scheme perfectly. The system requires participants to make additional deposits, which they will forfeit if there is any attempt to act in a way that breaches the terms of the contract. Full details can be found in the Escrow section of the whitepaper.
The usefulness of multisig and the escrow system may not seem obvious at first, but as mentioned before they'll form the backbone of Zano's Decentralized Marketplace service (described in the next section).

What does the future hold for Zano?

The planned upgrade to Zano's privacy, mentioned at the start, is obviously one of the most exciting things the team is working on, but it's not the only thing.
Zano Roadmap
Decentralized Marketplace
From the beginning, the Zano team's goal has been to create the perfect money. And money can't just be some vehicle for speculative investment, money must be used. To that end, the team have created a set of tools to make it as simple as possible for Zano to be integrated into eCommerce platforms. Zano's API’s and plugins are easy to use, allowing even those with very little coding experience to use them in their E-commerce-related ventures. The culmination of this effort will be a full Decentralized Anonymous Marketplace built on top of the Zano blockchain. Rather than being accessed via the wallet, it will act more as a service - Marketplace as a Service (MAAS) - for anyone who wishes to use it. The inclusion of a simple "snippet" of code into a website is all that's needed to become part a global decentralized, trustless and private E-commerce network.
Atomic Swaps
Just as Zano's marketplace will allow you to transact without needing to trust your counterparty, atomic swaps will let you to easily convert between Zano and other cyryptocurrencies without having to trust a third-party service such as a centralized exchange. On top of that, it will also lead to the way to Zano's inclusion in the many decentralized exchange (DEX) services that have emerged in recent years.

Where can I buy Zano?

Zano's currently listed on the following exchanges:
https://coinmarketcap.com/currencies/zano/markets/
It goes without saying, neither I nor the Zano team work for any of the exchanges or can vouch for their reliability. Use at your own risk and never leave coins on a centralized exchange for longer than necessary. Your keys, your coins!
If you have any old graphics cards lying around(both AMD & NVIDIA), then Zano is also mineable through its unique ProgPowZ algorithm. Here's a guide on how to get started.
Once you have some Zano, you can safely store it in one of the desktop or mobile wallets (available for all major platforms).

How can I support Zano?

Zano has no marketing department, which is why this post has been written by some guy and not the "Chief Growth Engineer @ Zano Enterprises". The hard part is already done: there's a team of world class developers and researchers gathered here. But, at least at the current prices, the team's funds are enough to cover the cost of development and little more. So the job of publicizing the project falls to the community. If you have any experience in community building/growth hacking at another cryptocurrency or open source project, or if you're a Zano holder who would like to ensure the project's long-term success by helping to spread the word, then send me a pm. We need to get organized.
Researchers and developers are also very welcome. Working at the cutting edge of mathematics and cryptography means Zano provides challenging and rewarding work for anyone in those fields. Please contact the project's Community Manager u/Jed_T if you're interested in joining the team.
Social Links:
Twitter
Discord Server
Telegram Group
Medium blog
I'll do my best to keep this post accurate and up to date. Message me please with any suggested improvements and leave any questions you have below.
Welcome to the Zano community and the new decentralized private economy!
submitted by OrsonJ to Zano [link] [comments]

Start learning programming " Here is the best Platforms for you"

Step by step Help for you:
Platforms Node.js Frontend Development iOS Android IoT & Hybrid Apps Electron Cordova React Native Xamarin Linux ContainersOS X Command-Line ScreensaverswatchOS JVM Salesforce Amazon Web Services Windows IPFS Fuse HerokuProgramming Languages JavaScript Promises Standard Style Must Watch Talks Tips Network Layer Micro npm Packages Mad Science npm Packages Maintenance Modules - For npm packages npmAVA - Test runner ESLintSwift Education PlaygroundsPython Rust Haskell PureScript Go Scala Ruby EventsClojure ClojureScript Elixir Elm Erlang Julia Lua C C/C++ R D Common Lisp Perl Groovy Dart JavaRxJava Kotlin OCaml Coldfusion Fortran .NET PHP Delphi Assembler AutoHotkey AutoIt Crystal TypeScriptFront-end Development ES6 Tools Web Performance Optimization Web Tools CSS Critical-Path Tools Scalability Must-Watch Talks ProtipsReact RelayWeb Components Polymer Angular 2 Angular Backbone HTML5 SVG Canvas KnockoutJS Dojo Toolkit Inspiration Ember Android UI iOS UI Meteor BEM Flexbox Web Typography Web Accessibility Material Design D3 Emails jQuery TipsWeb Audio Offline-First Static Website Services A-Frame VR - Virtual reality Cycle.js Text Editing Motion UI Design Vue.js Marionette.js Aurelia Charting Ionic Framework 2 Chrome DevToolsBack-end Development Django Flask Docker Vagrant Pyramid Play1 Framework CakePHP Symfony EducationLaravel EducationRails GemsPhalcon Useful .htaccess Snippets nginx Dropwizard Kubernetes LumenComputer Science University Courses Data Science Machine Learning TutorialsSpeech and Natural Language Processing SpanishLinguistics Cryptography Computer Vision Deep Learning - Neural networks TensorFlowDeep Vision Open Source Society University Functional Programming Static Analysis & Code Quality Software-Defined NetworkingBig Data Big Data Public Datasets Hadoop Data Engineering StreamingTheory Papers We Love Talks Algorithms Algorithm Visualizations Artificial Intelligence Search Engine Optimization Competitive Programming MathBooks Free Programming Books Free Software Testing Books Go Books R Books Mind Expanding Books Book AuthoringEditors Sublime Text Vim Emacs Atom Visual Studio CodeGaming Game Development Game Talks Godot - Game engine Open Source Games Unity - Game engine Chess LÖVE - Game engine PICO-8 - Fantasy consoleDevelopment Environment Quick Look Plugins - OS X Dev Env Dotfiles Shell Command-Line Apps ZSH Plugins GitHub Browser Extensions Cheat SheetGit Cheat Sheet & Git Flow Git Tips Git Add-ons SSH FOSS for DevelopersEntertainment Podcasts Email NewslettersDatabases Database MySQL SQLAlchemy InfluxDB Neo4j Doctrine - PHP ORM MongoDBMedia Creative Commons Media Fonts Codeface - Text editor fonts Stock Resources GIF Music Open Source Documents Audio VisualizationLearn CLI Workshoppers - Interactive tutorials Learn to Program Speaking Tech Videos Dive into Machine Learning Computer HistorySecurity Application Security Security CTF - Capture The Flag Malware Analysis Android Security Hacking Honeypots Incident ResponseContent Management System Umbraco Refinery CMSMiscellaneous JSON Discounts for Student Developers Slack CommunitiesConferences GeoJSON Sysadmin Radio Awesome Analytics Open Companies REST Selenium Endangered Languages Continuous Delivery Services Engineering Free for Developers Bitcoin Answers - Stack Overflow, Quora, etc Sketch - OS X design app Places to Post Your Startup PCAPTools Remote Jobs Boilerplate Projects Readme Tools Styleguides Design and Development Guides Software Engineering Blogs Self Hosted FOSS Production Apps Gulp AMA - Ask Me Anything AnswersOpen Source Photography OpenGL Productivity GraphQL Transit Research Tools Niche Job Boards Data Visualization Social Media Share Links JSON Datasets Microservices Unicode Code Points Internet of Things Beginner-Friendly Projects Bluetooth Beacons Programming Interviews Ripple - Open source distributed settlement network Katas Tools for Activism TAP - Test Anything Protocol Robotics MQTT - "Internet of Things" connectivity protocol Hacking Spots For Girls Vorpal - Node.js CLI framework OKR Methodology - Goal setting & communication best practices Vulkan LaTeX - Typesetting language Network Analysis Economics - An economist's starter kit
Few more resources:
submitted by Programming-Help to Programming_Languages [link] [comments]

Trojan malscripts; **what are they?**

in this post you will learn a little about publicly available information on malscripts
what is a trojan.malscript? -a quick google search turns up this result from 2014 (outdated?)
Search Results (Featured snippet from the web) Systems Affected: Windows - Trojan. Malscript is a heuristic detection for Web-based malicious script files that exploit vulnerabilities and/or perform heap spraying.-Sep 3, 2014- -Trojan.Malscript | Symantec- -https://www.symantec.com › security-center › writeup-
-not very clear!... lets try learn some more!!.. *another quick google search gives up some information about other systems not just windows affected
-If we add keywords like linux we get varied results such as this (albeit, older but w/e)
Search Results (Featured snippet from the web) -Systems Affected: Linux, Mac, Solaris, Windows.- Trojan. Malscript. C is a generic detection for HTML files infected with a JavaScript that redirects the browser to a malicious Web site that may exploit the browser or download other malicious threats.-Jan 30, 2010- -Trojan.Malscript.C | Technical Details | Removing Help ...- -https://us.norton.com › trojan.malscript.c-2010-013011-2940-99-writeup.html-
so given a couple quick searches we can guess a bit -we need: *java *HTML *access to the internet somehow (could be by an offline file touching an online source; this puts the item at risk for "contracting" offline ai or crawling codes)
another way would be
*write a "safe" code on here on reddit but its gonna take me time since reddit allows this:
if 1 * 2 < 3: print "hello, world!" 
this can be achieved by possibly writing a code to a site that had malscripts already deployed such as an embed code, or request in an "iframe"
  • Alot of people may remember sites such as:
https://www.xanga.com and various other places; *these places allowed HTML editing for themes and overall page layout -sites such as http://www.neopets.com etc. had/have this ability as well.

-these sites are great examples of how easy it could be to place an HTML or java malscript that was made to either be good/bad/both; especially now, given our extremely large usage of internet!
Sure; #scareme... what can a trojan.malscript do!
quick learned facts:
-exploits an available resource via internets (lol)
-is a form of 'script' (really generic term) that employs heuristic based approach; defined as and asked to google before:
What is a heuristic approach?- -“A heuristic technique, often called simply a heuristic, is any approach to problem solving, learning, or discovery that employs a practical method not guaranteed to be optimal or perfect, but sufficient for the immediate goals.-Feb 5, 2018- -Heuristic Approaches to Problem Solving- | -101 Computing- -https://www.101computing.net › heuristic-approaches-to-problem-solving-
-may perfrom heap spraying which is defined here
A heap spraying attack is a remote code execution exploit that allows the attacker to insert arbitrary code in the system's heap memory space. ... The spray is followed by exploit code that, when inserted into the heap memory, will exploit a weakness or vulnerability, allowing the code to execute on the system.-Aug 11, 2010- -Heap Spraying Buffer Overflow Attacks - Cisco.com- -https://tools.cisco.com › center › resources › security-alerts-announcement-
WAIT! isnt that good...or bad...or OMG wth! #notscared?scared?
it really depends 0.o
-why is there a malscript in the first place; this is a great place to start asking questions for any individual or business by asking what OS is being used and what version/type/grade/blahblah
I use windows xp, windows xp is a "unsupported"(mostly) os - I use it to dissect information. its wonderful! also sucks sometimes when the software is riddled with holes and various other "things" shoutout to Microsoft for updates in DEC 2019! x<.3
Windows xp pro sp3 5.1.2600
x86
smbios2.4
I use AVG anti-virus with highest settings and personal settings that the free version can have
get to know my computer better? #thisajoke??
Nah, over the years Ive collected knowledge and some more common answers to basic questions in cyber security, qustions like "what is a malscript"? have simple answers, mostly... things like these 5 objects can be defined as being malscript:
  • Anti-virus
  • Anti-malware
  • anti-execution mechanisms
  • any word processor may or may not be defined as malscript if it can "spell check" your work or place a timestamp
  • third party input/output mechanism; things such as mouses, sd, usb, cd, internet(s) that crawl for information like web.archive, bitcoin code, cryptocode overall if it has a weakness to malscripted behaviours
there are MULTIPLE other reasons, one such problem is:
mass-malware campaigns and adware from older computers attempting to propogate and control older versions of networks that no longer work as expected/coded to seek
^ this type of malscript "poorly planned, and hastily executed or outdated"; can have adverse impacts on the internet as a whole - not just for the computers expected to be impacted.
ok, malscripts. so what can #I do?
when approaching cyber security its easy to become overwhelmed by the amount of information that is available; to research; to dissect; to use as examples...
what the best thing anyone or a group can do?;
attempt to make an effort to learn about the item a bit before, using or expecting them to work a certain way; due to a biased info source like ones own
also:
seek outside sources, but also be careful an use knowledge seeked as knowledge that may or may not be "useful" for the current project or situation...
this post was an attempt to gain knowledge and some skills in writing and information sharing.
thanks everyone!
hope you enjoy my reading material!!
Have a Awwww-some new year!
ReachOutForBits recommends "useless" backup scanning after securely and safely removing identifiable information before scanning at https://www.virustotal.com before resell of computer or devices ; in order to avoid costly data blunders such as
ids/creds cloning
phonenumber collection
email collection
by persistent threats that are EXTREMELY HARD TO DETECT ; even penetrating some hardwares with advanced capabilities such as "sleeping" AI or, Run-mocking AI!
think of all the people who said AI will skynet us; maybe AI is just a stepping stone for some BAD F-IN MALWARE that someone has written that needs no C&C mechanism or user interaction at all - not the AI itself persay.
this is one form of persistant threat that needs to be identified to ensure non-tainted, verifiable, security information results into the future and beyond...
other threats include:
  • over-patriotic; otherwise defined as "EXTREMIST" - individuals of ANY COUNTRY, ANY RELIGION, ANY CREED, ANY BELIEF or OATH or CONSTITUTIONAL AGREEMENT.
  • fake bomb threats and faux-emergency calls
  • PAID INFORMANTS AND THEIR COUNTERPARTS
  • So called, anons, that gather in groups and communicate between each-other; effectively destroying the meaning of being ANON. singular noun
    the types of people(s) that write their own definition at urbandictionary and then proceed to agree together that thats it.
    • ahha, hah..hahahah...this is funnny....get this:
    -they also gather en-masse in attempts to overwhelm and proceed to cause irreprible cost or some form of damage - rarely peaceful anymore.
names like troll are no longer what they were, fictional characters under a bridge; troll is now Pseudonym for prankster(s) @ anycost
  • Crypto-currency Jackers who have designed tech to prevent proper payments and reward systems (at-source or in-transit) from being implemented; according to consensus.
  • Outdated, over-sourced(more than 10 downloads) malware
  • Junk and bloat that often comes preinstalled with no intention of caring whether or not the user will actually "use" it.
    this type of item hogs CPU/GPU and introduces ill timed updates that cannot be controlled!
STAY SAFE
submitted by killabell33 to MinimalistHacking [link] [comments]

ETH News/Dapp Compilation

Hi guys. This is a list I started just recently for personal use to keep track of all the great news we’ve gotten recently for Ethereum. I’m trying my best to categorize the articles by either what type of industry ETH is helping, or how ETH is being helped (Infrastructure section).
It is in no way a comprehensive list and I’d like to open it up to everyone here to contribute/pick apart. I’ve got an idea for basically an “onboarding packet” for Ethereum that will include a rundown of all this stuff, some defi growth stats, list of popular dapps, user guide for Metamask (None of which will come from me but will be compiled all into one place for the benefit of newbs).
I think any non-believer who reads all of the articles in this list, or even just the snippets I included, would be hard pressed to say “ETH isn’t used” or “crypto is a scam” …unless they are just a total moron. Apologies for bad formatting.
Charity/utilitarianism:
https://www.coindesk.com/oxfam-trials-delivery-of-disaster-relief-using-ethereum-stablecoin-dai “Oxfam has previously distributed help to Vanuatu villagers using cash, but the time taken for ID checks and bank visits was an obstacle, the charity representative said. Onboarding a new user for cash aid took around an hour, signing up for a DAI card takes six minutes, Micky wrote. Plus, it made the whole process more transparent.”
Infrastructure:
http://hitcryptonews.com/2019/04/17/ernst-young-ey-unveils-ethereum-blockchain-based-nightfall-protocol/
private UK tax/audit company with over 35 Billion in revenue "Instead of developing a private iteration, EY has announced that its Nightfall protocol will run on top of the public Ethereum network. Further, the multi-national accounting conglomerate has taken a unique strategy to intellectual property. The company said that it will not only open-source the protocol code but also put it in the public domain with absolutely no license at all."
https://blog.cloudflare.com/cloudflare-ethereum-gateway/
"Today, as part of Crypto Week 2019, we are excited to announce Cloudflare's Ethereum Gateway, where you can interact with the Ethereum network without installing any additional software on your computer."
https://www.coindesk.com/microsoft-ethereum-group-launch-token-building-kit-for-enterprises Microsoft launches a kit for businesses to build their own public Ethereum tokens.
https://www.coindesk.com/samsung-unveils-cryptocurrency-wallet-dapps-for-galaxy-s10-phone
“According to a report from CoinDesk Korea published Sunday, the Samsung Blockchain Wallet is currently compatible only with ether (ETH) and ethereum-based ERC20 tokens. Bitcoin is not yet supported, despite the logo appearing on earlier pre-release presentation images.”
https://www.coindesk.com/operas-browser-with-built-in-crypto-wallet-launches-for-iphones
“Dapps can be accessed by typing their address directly in the browser, avoiding the need to use third-party extensions” https://www.bitcoinisle.com/2019/04/05/ethereum-eth-former-white-house-deputy-ctos-blockchain-startup-raises-3-7m-in-seed-funding/ Former whitehouse Chief Technology Officer raising money for an Ethereum side-chain. The chain WILL use the public chain as a final authority, so not just another private chain.
https://cointelegraph.com/news/big-four-auditing-firm-pwc-releases-cryptocurrency-auditing-software
Per the release, the tool newly added to PwC’s Halo auditing suite can be used to “provide assurance services for entities engaging in cryptocurrency transactions.” The firm claims that, with the new addition, the Halo suite permits PwC to provide independent evidence of private-public key pairing (to establish crypto asset ownership), and gather information about transactions and balances from blockchains.
Supply Chain/Logistics:
https://decrypt.co/7621/farmer-trials-blockchain-supply-chain-app-says-its-better-than-excel
“With a spreadsheet, you have to take the farmers’ word on faith. But Treum provides a timestamp and a geolocation—tied to a specific, pre-selected field—that demonstrates, irrevocably, that the crop was grown where the farmer said it was grown. This data is then transferred, in the form of a single token, to the Ethereum network, where it cannot be overwritten.”
https://www.thedrinksbusiness.com/2019/06/idealwine-launches-authentication-tool/
"Cyrille Jomand, iDealwine’s CEO, said: “Bottles verified by iDealwine are equipped with an inviolable RFID TAG which permanently guarantees the link between the bottle of wine and the information contained and transferred in the blockchain.”
Finance:
https://www.forbes.com/sites/hanktucke2019/06/17/polish-bank-alior-uses-public-ethereum-blockchain-for-new-document-authentication-feature/#120959f244a6
"Societe Generale, a major French investment bank, issued a $112 million bond in security tokens on the public ethereum blockchain in April, but Alior’s management believes it is the first bank to use a public blockchain for a direct customer service solution"
"Customers can search documents they have received on Alior’s servers and browse their history to find where those documents are located on the (Ethereum) blockchain to ensure that they have not been changed by the bank since they were published."
http://fintechnews.sg/31826/blockchain/worlds-first-traditional-equity-shares-on-the-blockchain-blueshare-launches-in-singapore/ The token/share ratio is 1:1, meaning that 1 security token is backed by 1 Equity Capital Participation Share. Investments are accepted both in fiat and cryptocurrencies – Euro, Bitcoin, Ether, and Tether. The token sale started on May 6, 2019. The funds raised under the proposed security token offering will be used as a direct investment into the company’s mining and exploration concessions.
https://finance.yahoo.com/news/iceland-financial-regulator-approves-blockchain-190100164.html "Reykjavik-based Monerium, backed by blockchain software company ConsenSys, has reportedly been approved by the Icelandic financial watchdog to provide fiat payment services using ethereum (ETH) blockchain"
https://www.forbes.com/sites/stevenehrlich/2019/06/19/metlife-plans-to-disrupt-2-7-trillion-life-insurance-industry-using-ethereum-blockchain/#1dd36d002770 MetLife is utilizing the live public Ethereum blockchain to add transparency and efficiency to the claims process. In what is believed to be the first pilot program in the world focused on the life insurance industry, MetLife’s Singapore-based incubator LumenLab is collaborating with Singapore Press Holdings (SPH) and NTUC Income (Income) on a platform of smart contracts known as ‘Lifechain’ to help loved ones quickly determine if the deceased was protected with a policy and automatically file a claim.
Novelty/Games/Collectibles:
https://en.businesstimes.cn/articles/113719/20190614/ubisoft-may-soon-have-ethereum-in-game-items-and-blockchain-games.htm "The associate manager at Ubisoft, Anne Puck, added: "We think that blockchain has the potential to transform the gaming experience and even maybe to empower players as true stakeholders in their worlds. That's why our job is to accelerate the integration of blockchain at Ubisoft with this initiative." Ubisoft will likely enable in-game or in-app purchases via the Ethereum network. It is worth noting that the company has not clearly stated that any form of digital currency will be used for any such purchases. "
https://finance.yahoo.com/news/austria-post-launches-crypto-stamp-132010928.html "The “Crypto Stamp” is the first use case for non-fungible tokens launched by a government so far, making it a milestone. The pilot’s success will help determine the future for NFTs, which can now be issued across multiple Ethereum token standards."
https://coinjournal.net/japans-first-blockchain-game-crypt-oink-expands-to-english-speaking-markets-partners-with-cryptokitties/ "Created by Japan-based developer Good Luck 3, Crypt-Oink is a decentralized application (DApp) running on the Ethereum network. The game lets users breed, collect and trade digital racing pigs called Cryptons."
Data/Identity Management:
https://www.forbes.com/sites/rachelwolfson/2019/06/25/ibm-orbs-consensys-work-together-on-global-blockchain-settlement-platform-for-telecoms/#498d66c4782c “In particular for this project, we propose solutions for the "transaction orchestration layer," and decentralized identities for participants in the network, solutions that have already been deployed successfully on Ethereum, and can integrate with other DLTs."
List of actually useful/cool Ethereum Apps(Some are Dapps others just involve ETH):
https://app.compound.finance/# Lending/borrowing ETH and ETH tokens. No fixed lending periods and interest is generated in real time (Every block I think– roughly ten seconds)
https://cdp.makerdao.com/ Mint DAI against your Ether.
https://www.augur.net/ Create a betting market for anything you can imagine. Use https://predictions.global/ to view current markets without downloading the client.
https://kyberswap.com Trade ETH tokens right from your Metamask account without having to deposit/withdrawal to an exchange.
https://godsunchained.com/ Buy trading cards for the first AAA quality hearthstone-esque Ethereum card game where your cards are tokens in your wallet and are freely tradeable (Or at least they will be once the game is out of Beta…)
https://trade.dydx.exchange/ Decentralized leverage trading right from your Metamask wallet.
Other Utilities and Resources:
https://etherscan.io Block explorer. Use this to check out your ETH address, smart contract addresses, spy on whales addresses, etc.
https://www.ethgasstation.info/ Check current gas prices and transaction speeds.
https://github.com/ethereumbook/ethereumbook This is the github version of “Mastering Ethereum” Which goes over the basics of how Ethereum works with smart contracts and nodes and whatnot. It’s actually easier to follow along with than you’d think. Can also buy the PDF version on Amazon.
submitted by hello_again_world to ethtrader [link] [comments]

2017 Taxes Megathread - Income Tax, Capital Gains Tax, and Mining

There's a lot of posts in /BitcoinCA popping up about tax questions and it's tax season so please post all tax related questions and discussions in this thread to clear up the clutter and this way we don't need to repeat ourselves.
I've been able to find the fallowing links on crypto taxes that can offer some guidance. I included some snippets with key take aways click the links to read the full articles for context.

CRA: What you should know about digital currency

Do tax rules apply when digital currency is used?
Yes. Where digital currency is used to pay for goods or services, the rules for barter transactions apply. A barter transaction occurs when any two persons agree to exchange goods or services and carry out that exchange without using legal currency. For example, paying for movies with digital currency is a barter transaction. The value of the movies purchased using digital currency must be included in the seller’s income for tax purposes. The amount to be included would be the value of the movies in Canadian dollars.
More information on the tax implications of barter transactions is available by consulting the Canada Revenue Agency’s Interpretation Bulletin IT-490, Barter Transactions.
Digital currency can also be bought or sold like a commodity. Any resulting gains or losses could be taxable income or capital for the taxpayer. Paragraphs 9 to 32 of Interpretation Bulletin IT-479R, Transactions in Securities, provide information that can help in determining whether transactions are income or capital in nature.

Inuit/TurboTax: How Bitcoins Might Impact Your Income Taxes

Trade and Barter Transactions With Virtual Currencies
Transactions made with bitcoins or other virtual currency are covered by the section of the tax code that governs barter and trade transactions. Under this portion of the tax code, you must declare any income received or expenses made, regardless of whether any actual cash was tied to the transaction.
For example, if you run a daycare and you accept eggs, bitcoins or any other type of trade in exchange for child care, you still are required to report these transactions on your income taxes. Since you can’t declare bitcoins, eggs or other material items on your tax form, you must declare the typical dollar amount that you would have otherwise claimed for those services.

The Globe and Mail: Here's what you need to know about the Canadian tax implications of cryptocurrencies

I "mined" cryptocurrency. What are the tax consequences?
Cryptocurrency miners should report as income the cryptocurrency they earn, and should be able to deduct associated losses, such as those hefty electricity costs.
I was paid in cryptocurrency. What should I do?
If your employer has paid you with cryptocurrency, it's like being paid with money. You will be required to pay income tax on your earnings.
If you are an independent contractor and you have been paid with cryptocurrency, again, from a tax perspective, it's like being paid with money. You need to pay income tax and collect GST/HST, but you can also deduct associated expenses and claim input tax credits.
For general tax advice /PersonalFinanceCanada is worth checking out.
submitted by PoliticalDissidents to BitcoinCA [link] [comments]

Blowing the lid off the CryptoNote/Bytecoin scam (with the exception of Monero) - Reformatted for Reddit

Original post by rethink-your-strategy on Bitcointalk.org here
This post has been reformatted to share on Reddit. What once was common knowledge, is now gone. You want a quality history lesson? Share this like wildfire.
August 15, 2014, 08:15:37 AM

Preamble

I'd like to start off by stating categorically that the cryptography presented by CryptoNote is completely, entirely solid. It has been vetted and looked over by fucking clever cryptographers/developers/wizards such as gmaxwell. Monero have had a group of independent mathematicians and cryptographers peer-reviewing the whitepaper (their annotations are here, and one of their reviews is here), and this same group of mathematicians and cryptographers is now reviewing the implementation of the cryptography in the Monero codebase. Many well known Bitcoin developers have already had a cursory look through the code to establish its validity. It is safe to say that, barring more exotic attacks that have to be mitigated over time as they are invented/discovered, and barring a CryptoNote implementation making rash decisions to implement something that reduces the anonymity set, the CryptoNote currencies are all cryptographically unlinkable and untraceable.
Two other things I should mention. I curse a lot when I'm angry (and scams like this make me angry). Second, where used my short date format is day/month/year (smallest to biggest).
If you find this information useful, a little donation would go a long way. Bitcoin address is 1rysLufu4qdVBRDyrf8ZjXy1nM19smTWd.

The Alleged CryptoNote/Bytecoin Story

CryptoNote is a new cryptocurrency protocol. It builds on some of the Bitcoin founding principles, but it adds to them. There are aspects of it that are truly well thought through and, in a sense, quite revolutionary. CryptoNote claim to have started working on their project years ago after Bitcoin's release, and I do not doubt the validity of this claim...clearly there's a lot of work and effort that went into this. The story as Bytecoin and CryptoNote claim it to be is as follows:
They developed the code for the principles expressed in their whitepaper, and in April, 2012, they released Bytecoin. All of the copyright messages in Bytecoin's code are "copyright the CryptoNote Developers", so clearly they are one and the same as the Bytecoin developers. In December 2012, they released their CryptoNote v1 whitepaper. In September 2013, they released their CryptoNote v2 whitepaper. In November 2013, the first piece of the Bytecoin code was first pushed to Github by "amjuarez", with a "Copyright (c) 2013 amjuarez" copyright notice. This was changed to "Copyright (c) 2013 Antonio Juarez" on March 3rd, 2014. By this juncture only the crypto libraries had been pushed up to github. Then, on March 4th, 2014, "amjuarez" pushed the rest of the code up to github, with the README strangely referring to "cybernote", even though the code referred to "Cryptonote". The copyrights all pointed to "the Cryptonote developers", and the "Antonio Juarez" copyright and license file was removed. Within a few days, "DStrange" stumbled across the bytecoin.org website when trying to mine on the bte.minefor.co.in pool (a pool for the-other-Bytecoin, BTE, not the-new-Bytecoin, BCN), and the rest is history as we know it. By this time Bytecoin had had a little over 80% of its total emission mined.

Immediate Red Flags

The first thing that is a red flag in all of this is that nobody, and I mean no-fucking-body, is a known entity. "Antonio Juarez" is not a known entity, "DStrange" is not a known entity, none of the made up names on the Bytecoin website exist (they've since removed their "team" page, see below), none of the made up names on the CryptoNote website exist (Johannes Meier, Maurice Planck, Max Jameson, Brandon Hawking, Catherine Erwin, Albert Werner, Marec Plíškov). If they're pseudonyms, then say so. If they're real names, then who the fuck are they??? Cryptographers, mathematicians, and computer scientists are well known - they have published papers or at least have commented on articles of interest. Many of them have their own github repos and Twitter feeds, and are a presence in the cryptocurrency community.
The other immediate red flag is that nobody, and I mean no-fucking-body, had heard of Bytecoin. Those that had heard of it thought it was the crummy SHA-256 Bitcoin clone that was a flop in the market. Bytecoin's claim that it had existed "on the deep web" for 2 years was not well received, because not a single vendor, user, miner, drug addict, drug seller, porn broker, fake ID card manufacturer, student who bought a fake ID card to get into bars, libertarian, libertard, cryptographer, Tor developer, Freenet developer, i2p developer, pedophile, or anyone else that is a known person - even just known on the Internet - had ever encountered "Bytecoin" on Tor. Ever. Nobody.

Indisputable Facts

Before I start with some conjecture and educated guesswork, I'd like to focus on an indisputable fact that obliterates any trust in both Bytecoin's and CryptoNote's bullshit story. Note, again, that I do not doubt the efficacy of the mathematics and cryptography behind CryptoNote, nor do I think there are backdoors in the code. What I do know for a fact is that the people behind CryptoNote and Bytecoin have actively deceived the Bitcoin and cryptocurrency community, and that makes them untrustworthy now and in the future. If you believe in the fundamentals in CryptoNote, then you need simply use a CryptoNote-derived cryptocurrency that is demonstrably independent of CryptoNote and Bytecoin's influence. Don't worry, I go into this a little later.
So as discussed, there were these two whitepapers that I linked to earlier. Just in case they try remove them, here is the v1 whitepaper and the v2 whitepaper mirrored on Archive.org. This v1/v2 whitepaper thing has been discussed at length on the Bytecoin forum thread, and the PGP signature on the files has been confirmed as being valid. When you open the respective PDFs you'll notice the valid signatures in them:
signature in the v1 whitepaper
signature in the v2 whitepaper
These are valid Adobe signatures, signed on 15/12/2012 and 17/10/2013 respectively. Here's where it gets interesting. When we inspect this file in Adobe Acrobat we get a little more information on the signature
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Notice the bit that says "Signing time is from the clock on the signer's computer"? Now normally you would use a Timestamp Authority (TSA) to validate your system time. There are enough public, free, RFC 3161 compatible TSAs that this is not a difficult thing. CryptoNote chose not do this. But we have no reason to doubt the time on the signature, right guys? crickets
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See these references from the v1 whitepaper footnotes? Those two also appear in the v2 whitepaperth. Neither of those two footnotes refer to anything in the main body of the v1 whitepaper's text, they're non-existent (in the v2 whitepaper they are used in text). The problem, though, is that the Bitcointalk post linked in the footnote is not from early 2012 (proof screenshot is authentic: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=196259.0)
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May 5, 2013. The footnote is referencing a post that did not exist until then. And yet we are to believe that the whitepaper was signed on 12/12/2012! What sort of fucking fools do they take us for?
A little bit of extra digging validates this further. The document properties for both the v1 whitepaper as well as the v2 whitepaper confirms they were made in TeX Live 2013, which did not exist on 12/12/2012. The XMP properties are also quite revealing
XMP properties for the v1 whitepaper
XMP properties for the v2 whitepaper
According to that, the v1 whitepaper PDF was created on 10/04/2014, and the v2 whitepaper was created on 13/03/2014. And yet both of these documents were then modified in the past (when they were signed). Clearly the CryptoNote/Bytecoin developers are so advanced they also have a time machine, right?
Final confirmation that these creation dates are correct are revealed those XMP properties. The properties on both documents confirm that the PDF itself was generated from the LaTeX source using pdfTeX-1.40.14 (the pdf:Producer property). Now pdfTeX is a very old piece of software that isn't updated very often, so the minor version (the .14 part) is important.
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pdfTeX 1.40.14 pushed to source repo on Feb 14, 2014
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This version of pdfTeX was only pushed to the pdfTeX source repository on February 14, 2014, although it was included in a very early version of TeX Live 2013 (version 2013.20130523-1) that was released on May 23, 2013. The earliest mentions on the Internet of this version of pdfTeX are in two Stack Exchange comments that confirm its general availability at the end of May 2013 (here and here).
The conclusion we draw from this is that the CryptoNote developers, as clever as they were, intentionally deceived everyone into believing that the CryptoNote whitepapers were signed in 2012 and 2013, when the reality is that the v2 whitepaper was created in March, 2014, and the v1 whitepaper haphazardly created a month later by stripping bits out of the v2 whitepaper (accidentally leaving dead footnotes in).
Why would they create this fake v2 whitepaper in the first place? Why not just create a v1 whitepaper, or not even version it at all? The answer is simple: they wanted to lend credence and validity to the Bytecoin "2 years on the darkweb" claim so that everyone involved in CryptoNote and Bytecoin could profit from the 2 year fake mine of 82% of Bytecoin. What they didn't expect is the market to say "no thank you" to their premine scam.

And Now for Some Conjecture

As I mentioned earlier, the Bytecoin "team" page disappeared. I know it exists, because "AtomicDoge" referred to it as saying that one of the Bytecoin developers is a professor at Princeton. I called them out on it, and within a week the page had disappeared. Fucking cowards.
That was the event that triggered my desire to dig deeper and uncover the fuckery. As I discovered more and more oddities, fake accounts, trolling, and outright falsehoods, I wondered how deep the rabbit hole went. My starting point was DStrange. This is the account on Bitcointalk that "discovered" Bytecoin accidentally a mere 6 days after the first working iteration of the code was pushed to Github, purely by chance when mining a nearly dead currency on a tiny and virtually unheard of mining pool. He has subsequently appointed himself the representative of Bytecoin, or something similar. The whole thing is so badly scripted it's worse than a Spanish soap opera...I can't tell who Mr. Gonzales, the chief surgeon, is going to fuck next.
At the same time as DStrange made his "fuck me accidental discovery", another Bitcointalk account flared up to also "accidentally discover this weird thing that has randomly been discovered": Rias. What's interesting about both the "Rias" and "DStrange" accounts are their late 2013 creation date (October 31, 2013, and December 23, 2013, respectively), and yet they lay dormant until suddenly, out of the blue, on January 20th/21st they started posting. If you look at their early posts side by side you can even see the clustering: Rias, DStrange.
At any rate, the DStrange account "discovering" Bytecoin is beyond hilarious, especially with the Rias account chiming in to make the discovery seem natural. Knowing what we unmistakably do about the fake CryptoNote PDF dates lets us see this in a whole new light.
Of course, as has been pointed out before, the Bytecoin website did not exist in its "discovered" form until sometime between November 13, 2013 (when it was last captured as this random picture of a college girl) and February 25, 2014 (when it suddenly had the website on it as "discovered"). This can be confirmed by looking at the captures on Wayback Machine: https://web.archive.org/web/*/http://bytecoin.org
The CryptoNote website, too, did not exist in its current form until after October 20, 2013, at which time it was still the home of an encrypted message project by Alain Meier, a founding member of the Stanford Bitcoin Group and co-founder of BlockScore. This, too, can be confirmed on Wayback Machine: https://web.archive.org/web/*/http://cryptonote.org
~It's hard to ascertain whether Alain had anything to do with CryptoNote or Bytecoin. It's certainly conceivable that the whitepaper was put together by him and other members of the Stanford Bitcoin Group, and the timeline fits, given that the group only formed around March 2013. More info on the people in the group can be found on their site, and determining if they played a role is something you can do in your own time.~
Update: Alain Meier posted in this thread, and followed it up with a Tweet, confirming that he has nothing to do with CryptoNote and all the related...stuff.

Batshit Insane

The Bytecoin guys revel in creating and using sockpuppet accounts. Remember that conversation where "Rias" asked who would put v1 on a whitepaper with no v2 out, and AlexGR said "a forward looking individual"? The conversation took place on May 30, and was repeated verbatim by shill accounts on Reddit on August 4 (also, screenshot in case they take it down).
Those two obvious sockpuppet/shill accounts also take delight in bashing Monero in the Monero sub-reddit (here are snippets from WhiteDynomite and cheri0). Literally the only thing these sockpuppets do, day in and day out, is make the Bytecoin sub-reddit look like it's trafficked, and spew angry bullshit all over the Monero sub-reddit. Fucking batshit insane - who the fuck has time for that? Clearly they're pissy that nobody has fallen for their scam. Oh, and did I mention that all of these sockpuppets have a late January/early February creation date? Because that's not fucking obvious at all.
And let's not forget that most recently the sockpuppets claimed that multi-sig is "a new revolutionary technology, it was discovered a short time ago and Bytecoin already implemented it". What the actual fuck. If you think that's bad, you're missing out on the best part of all: the Bytecoin shills claim that Bytecoin is actually Satoshi Nakamoto's work. I'm not fucking kidding you. For your viewing pleasure...I present to you...the Bytecoin Batshit Insane Circus:
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https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=512747.msg8354977#msg8354977
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Seriously. Not only is this insulting as fuck to Satoshi Nakamoto, but it's insulting as fuck to our intelligence. And yet the fun doesn't stop there, folks! I present to you...the centerpiece of this Bytecoin Batshit Insane Circus exhibit...
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Of course! How could we have missed it! The clues were there all along! The CryptoNote/Bytecoin developers are actually aliens! Fuck me on a pogostick, this is the sort of stuff that results in people getting committed to the loony bin.
One last thing: without doing too much language analysis (which is mostly supposition and bullshit), it's easy to see common grammar and spelling fuck ups. My personal favorite is the "Is it true?" question. You can see it in the Bytecoin thread asking if it's Satoshi's second project, in the Monero thread asking if the Monero devs use a botnet to fake demand, and in the Dashcoin thread confirming the donation address (for a coin whose only claim is that they copy Bytecoin perfectly, what the fuck do they need donations for??).

Layer After Layer

One of the things that happened soon after the Bytecoin "big reveal" was a string of forks popping up. The first was Bitmonero on April 18. Fantomcoin was launched May 6. Quazarcoin was launched May 8. HoneyPenny was announced on April 21, although only launched as Boolberry on May 17. duckNote was launched on May 30. MonetaVerde as launched June 17.
Now for some reason unbeknownst to anyone with who isn't a retarded fuckface, the Bytecoin code was pushed up to SourceForge on 08/04/2014 (the "Registered" date is at the bottom of the page). I have no idea why they did this, maybe it's to try and lend credence to their bullshit story (oh hey, look how old Bytecoin is, it's even on Sourceforge!)
Coincidentally, and completely unrelated (hurr durr), Quazarcoin, Fantomcoin, and Monetaverde are all also on Sourceforge. This gives us a frame of reference and a common link between them - it's quite clear that at least these three are run by the same team as CryptoNote. There is further anecdotal evidence that can be gathered by looking at the shill posts in the threads (especially the way the Moneteverda shills praise merge mining, in a way that is nearly fucking indistinguishable from the Bytecoin praise for multi-sig technology).
QuazarCoin is a special case and deserves a little attention. Let's start with OracionSeis, who launched it. He's well known on Bitcointalk for selling in-game currencies. In that same thread you'll notice this gem right at the end from Fullbuster: "Hey,OracionSeis is no longer under my use so please https://bitcointa.lk/threads/selling-most-of-the-game-currencies.301540/#post-5996983 come into this thread! thank you !" Click through to his new link and Fullbuster clarifies: "Hello, I may look new around here but i've sold my first account and created new one and i have an intention to keep the same services running as my first account did." So now that we know that OracionSeis is a fucking bought account, we can look at his actions a little more critically.
On May 7, just when Monero was being taken back by the community (see below), OracionSeis out of the blue decided to take it overelaunch it himself. This included a now-defunct website at monero.co.in, and a since-abandoned Github. The community pushed back hard, true to form, with hard-hitting statements such as "To reiterate, this is not the original devs, and thus not a relaunch. OP, fuck you for trying this. This should warrant a ban." A man after my own heart. OracionSeis caved and decided to rename it to...QuazarCoin, which launched on May 8. To recap: bought account, launched by trying to "relaunch" Monero, got fucked up, renamed it to QuazarCoin. Clearly and undeniably goes in our pile of fuckface coins.
The other three are a little more interesting. Let's start with ~fuckNote~duckNote. It's hard to say if duckNote is a CryptoNote/Bytecoin project. The addition of the HTML based wallet is a one-trick pony, a common thread among most of the CryptoNote/Bytecoin controlled coins, but that could also be the result of a not-entirely-retarded developer. Given the shill posts in the duckNote thread I'm going to flag it as possibly-controlled-by-the-fuckface-brigade.
And now we come to ~HoneyPenny~ ~MoneyPenny~ ~HoneyBerry~ ~Boolean~ Boolberry. This is an interesting one. This was "pre-announced" on April 21, although it was only released with the genesis block on May 17. This puts it fourth in line, after Fantomcoin and Quazarcoin, although fucktarded proponents of the shittily-named currency insist that it was launched on April 21 because of a pre-announcement. Fucking rejects from the Pool of Stupidity, some of them. At any rate, "cryptozoidberg" is the prolific coder that churned out a Keccak-derived PoW (Wild Keccak) in a month, and then proceeded to add completely fucking retarded features like address aliasing that requires you to mine a block to get an address (lulz) and will never cause any issues when "google" or "obama" or "zuckerberg" want their alias back. Namecoin gets around this by forcing you to renew every ~200 - 250 days, and besides, nobody is making payments to microsoft.bit. This aliasing system is another atypical one-trick-pony that the CryptoNote developers push out and claim is monumental and historical and amazing.
There's also the matter of cryptozoidberg's nickname. In the Bytecoin code there's the BYTECOIN_NETWORK identifiert, which according to the comment is "Bender's nightmare" (hurr durr, such funny, 11100111110001011011001210110110 has a 2 in it). Now this may be a little bit of conjecture, yo, but the same comment appears twice in the "epee" contributed library, once in the levin signature, and again in the portable storage signature. The contexts are so disconnected and different that it would be a fucking stretch to imagine that the same person did not write both of these. We can also rule out this being a Bytecoin-specific change, as the "Bender's nightmare" comments exist in the original epee library on githubw (which is completely unused anywhere on the planet except in Bytecoin, most unusual for a library that has any usefulness, and was first committed to github on February 9, 2014).
We know from the copyright that Andrey N. Sabelnikov is the epee author, and we can say with reasonable certainty that he was involved in Bytecoin's creation and is the dev behind Boolberry. Sabelnikov is quite famous - he wrote the Kelihos botnet code and worked at two Russian security firms, Microsoft took him to court for his involvement (accusing him of operating the botnet as well), and then settled with him out of court on the basis of him not running the botnet but just having written the code. Kelihos is a botnet that pumped out online pharmacy spam (you know the fucking annoying "Y-ou Ne3D Vi-4Gra!?" emails? those.) so it's good to see he transitioned from that to a cryptocurrency scam. Regardless of BBR's claim to have "fixed" CryptoNote's privacy (and the fake fight on Bitcointalk between the "Bytecoin devs" and cryptozoidberg), it's clear that the link between them is not transparent. BBR is either the brainchild of a spam botnet author that worked on Bytecoin, or it's the CryptoNote developers trying to have one currency distanced from the rest so that they have a claim for legitimacy. I think it's the second one, and don't want to enter into a fucking debate about it. Make up your own mind.
Which brings us to the oddest story of the bunch: Bitmonero. It's pretty clear, given its early launch date and how unfamiliar anyone was with creating a genesis block or working in completely undocumented code, that thankful_for_today is/was part of the CryptoNote developers. He made a fatal error, though: he thought (just like all the other cryptocurrencies) that being "the dev" made him infallible. Ya know what happened? He tried to force his ideas, the community politely said "fuck you", and Bitmonero was forked into Monero, which is leading the pack of CryptoNote-based coins today. Let me be perfectly fucking clear: it doesn't matter that the Bytecoin/CryptoNote developers know their code and can push stuff out, and it doesn't matter that Sabelnikov can shovel bullshit features into his poorly named cryptocurrency, and it doesn't matter that Monetaverde is "green" and has "merged mining". Nobody working behind these cryptocurrencies is known in the cryptocurrency community, and that alone should be a big fucking red flag. Monero is streets ahead, partly because of the way they're developing the currency, but mostly because the "core devs" or whatever they're called are made up of reasonably well-known people. That there are a bunch of them (6 or 7?) plus a bunch of other people contributing code means that they're sanity checking each other.
And, as we saw, this has fucking infuriated the Bytecoin/CryptoNote developers. They're so angry they waste hours and hours with their Reddit accounts trawling the Monero sub-reddit, for what? Nobody has fallen for their scam, and after my revelation today nobody fucking will. Transparency wins, everything else is bullshit.
As pointed out by canonsburg, when the Bytecoin/CryptoNote people realised they'd lost the fucking game, they took a "scorched earth" approach. If they couldn't have the leading CryptoNote coin...they'd fucking destroy the rest by creating a shit-storm of CryptoNote coins. Not only did they setup a thread with "A complete forking guide to create your own CryptoNote currency", but they even have a dedicated website with a fuckton of JavaScript. Unfortunately this plan hasn't worked for them, because they forgot that nobody gives a fuck, and everyone is going to carry on forking Bitcoin-based coins because of the massive infrastructure and code etc. that works with Bitcoin-based coins.
There are a bunch of other useless CryptoNote coins, by the way: Aeon, Dashcoin, Infinium-8, OneEvilCoin. We saw earlier that Dashcoin is probably another CryptoNote developer driven coin. However, this entire group is not really important enough, nor do they have enough potential, for me to give a single fuck, so make up your own mind. New CryptoNote coins that pop up should be regarded with the utmost caution, given the bullshit capabilities that we've already seen.

All Tied Up in a Bow

I want to cement the relationship between the major CryptoNote shitcoins. I know that my previous section had a lot of conjecture in it, and there's been some insinuation that I'm throwing everyone under the bus because I'm raging against the machine. That's not my style. I'm more of a Katy Perry fan..."you're going to hear me roar". There were some extra links I uncovered during my research, and I lacked the time to add it to this post. Thankfully a little bit of sleep and a can of Monster later have given me the a chance to add this. Let's start with an analysis of the DNS records of the CN coins.
If we look at the whois and DNS records for bytecoin.org, quazarcoin.org, fantomcoin.org, monetaverde.org, cryptonote.org, bytecoiner.org, cryptonotefoundation.org, cryptonotestarter.org, and boolberry.com, we find three common traits, from not-entirely-damming to oh-shiiiiiiit:
  1. There's a lot of commonality with the registrar (NameCheap for almost all of them), the DNS service (HurricaneElectric's Free DNS or NameCheap's DNS), and with the webhost (LibertyVPS, QHosteSecureFastServer.com, etc.)
  2. All of the CN domains use WhoisGuard or similar private registration services.
  3. Every single domain, without exception, uses Zoho for email. The only outlier is bitmonero.org that uses Namecheap's free email forwarding, but it's safe to disregard this as the emails probably just forward to the CryptoNote developers' email.
The instinct may be to disregard this as a fucking convenient coincidence. But it isn't: Zoho used to be a distant second go Google Apps, but has since fallen hopelessly behind. Everyone uses Google Apps or they just use mail forwarding or whatever. With the rest of the points as well, as far-fetched as the link may seem, it's the combination that is unusual and a dead giveaway of the common thread. Just to demonstrate that I'm not "blowing shit out of proportion" I went and checked the records for a handful of coins launched over the past few months to see what they use.
darkcoin.io: mail: Namecheap email forwarding, hosting: Amazon AWS, open registration through NameCheap monero.cc: mail: mail.monero.cc, hosting: behind CloudFlare, open registration through Gandi xc-official.com: mail: Google Apps, hosting: MODX Cloud, hidden registration (DomainsByProxy) through GoDaddy blackcoin.io: mail: Namecheap email forwarding, hosting: behind BlackLotus, open registration through NameCheap bitcoindark.org: mail: no MX records, hosting: Google User Content, open registration through Wix viacoin.org: mail: mx.viacoin.org, hosting: behind CloudFlare, closed registration (ContactPrivacy) through Hostnuke.com neutrinocoin.org: mail: HostGator, hosting: HostGator, open registration through HostGator
There's no common thread between them. Everyone uses different service providers and different platforms. And none of them use Zoho.
My next check was to inspect the web page source code for these sites to find a further link. If you take a look at the main CSS file linked in the source code for monetaverde.org, fantomcoin.org, quazarcoin.org, cryptonotefoundation.org, cryptonote-coin.org, cryptonote.org, bitmonero.org, and bytecoiner.org, we find a CSS reset snippet at the top. It has a comment at the top that says "/* CSS Reset /", and then where it resets/sets the height it has the comment "/ always display scrollbars */". Now, near as I can find, this is a CSS snipped first published by Jake Rocheleau in an article on WebDesignLedger on October 24, 2012 (although confusingly Google seems to think it appeared on plumi.de cnippetz first, but checking archive.org shows that it was only added to that site at the beginning of 2013). It isn't a very popular CSS reset snippet, it got dumped in a couple of gists on Github, and translated and re-published in an article on a Russian website in November, 2012 (let's not go full-blown conspiritard and assume this links "cryptozoidberg" back to this, he's culpable enough on his own).
It's unusual to the point of being fucking impossible for one site to be using this, let alone a whole string of supposedly unrelated sites. Over the past few years the most popular CSS reset scripts have been Eric Meyer's "Reset CSS", HTML5 Doctor CSS Reset, Yahoo! (YUI 3) Reset CSS, Universal Selector ‘’ Reset, and Normalize.css, none of which contain the "/ CSS Reset /" or "/ always display scrollbars */" comments.
You've got to ask yourself a simple question: at what point does the combination of all of these fucking coincidental, completely unusual elements stop being coincidence and start becoming evidence of a real, tenable link? Is it possible that bytecoin.org, quazarcoin.org, fantomcoin.org, monetaverde.org, cryptonote.org, bytecoiner.org, cryptonotefoundation.org, cryptonotestarter.org, and boolberry.com just happen to use similar registrars/DNS providers/web hosts and exactly the fucking same wildly unpopular email provider? And is it also possible that monetaverde.org, fantomcoin.org, quazarcoin.org, cryptonotefoundation.org, cryptonote-coin.org, cryptonote.org, and bytecoin.org just happen to use the same completely unknown, incredibly obscure CSS reset snippet? It's not a conspiracy, it's not a coincidence, it's just another piece of evidence that all of these were spewed out by the same fucking people.

The Conclusion of the Matter

Don't take the last section as any sort of push for Monero. I think it's got potential (certainly much more than the other retarded "anonymous" coins that "developers" are popping out like street children from a cheap ho), and I hold a bit of XMR for shits and giggles, so take that tacit endorsement with a pinch of fucking salt.
The point is this: Bytecoin's 82% premine was definitely the result of a faked blockchain. CryptoNote's whitepaper dates were purposely falsified to back up this bullshit claim. Both Bytecoin and CryptoNote have perpetuated this scam by making up fake website data and all sorts. They further perpetuate it using shill accounts, most notably "DStrange" and "Rias" among others.
They launched a series of cryptocurrencies that should be avoided at all cost: Fantomcoin, Quazarcoin, and Monetaverde. They are likely behind duckNote and Boolberry, but fuck it, it's on your head if you want to deal with scam artists and botnet creators.
They developed amazing technology, and had a pretty decent implementation. They fucked themselves over by being fucking greedy, being utterly retarded, being batshit insane, and trying to create legitimacy where there was none. They lost the minute the community took Monero away from them, and no amount of damage control will save them from their own stupidity.
I expect there to be a fuck-ton of shills posting in this thread (and possibly a few genuine supporters who don't know any better). If you want to discuss or clarify something, cool, let's do that. If you want to have a protracted debate about my conjecture, then fuck off, it's called conjecture for a reason you ignoramus. I don't really give a flying fuck if I got it right or wrong, you're old and ugly enough to make up your own mind.
tl;dr - CryptoNote developers faked dates in whitepapers. Bytecoin faked dates in fake blockchain to facilitate an 82% premine, and CryptoNote backed them up. Bytecoin, Fantomcoin, Quazarcoin, Monetaverde, Dashcoin are all from the same people and should be avoided like the fucking black plague. duckNote and Boolberry are probably from them as well, or are at least just fucking dodgy, and who the fuck cares anyway. Monero would have been fucking dodgy, but the community saved it. Make your own mind up about shit and demand that known people are involved and that there is fucking transparency. End transmission.
Just a reminder that if you found this information useful, a little donation would go a long way. Bitcoin address is 1rysLufu4qdVBRDyrf8ZjXy1nM19smTWd.
submitted by OsrsNeedsF2P to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

My band trying to use Bitcoin for mp3 downloads. Does it have to be this complicated?

Hello, My acoustic folk anarcho-punk band has been trying to configure our website to accept Bitcoins for users to download our mp3s, but everything seems so complicated!
Is there an easy way for us to allow users to send 25 cents in Bitcoin to our Bitcoin address and then in return they are re-directed to our mp3 file for download?
We've tried Blockchains API which didn't really get us anywhere the instructions are vague and not very useful. I read some instructions on stackoverlow but we would have to download the entire blockchain and run a bitcoind? No way are we doing that! There are no youtube videos on how to set up a simple Bitcoin payment portal. It's very frustrating to want to accept this currency but not have any good resources available.
P.S. we are not total computer idiots. We built our own website and I know html. Our drummer knows PHP and javascript. With our powers combined I thought we would have no problem putting this together, but I was wrong. I just want a simple code snippet I can enter in our existing website code that tells the user to send 250 bits or 25 cents or whatever and once they do they are given our mp3. I don't want the user to have to leave our website for this either.
Any options for us, or is Bitcoin not ready for this type of easy implementation yet?
EDIT: SOLUTION Thanks to everyone for their help, suggestions and solutions.
xbtdev suggested satoshibox.com - this is a great solution for someone with no coding experience. No registration required, just upload and they give you a link or a snippet of code.
grintor provided us with a solution using blockchain's API. This is the type of code we were looking for. The code is pretty straight forward and light weight, and does not require a database or even use of PHP sessions. https://github.com/grintoantiquesons
We tried using Blockchain's API on our own but we didn't get anywhere as there were little to no instructions available. A tutorial on using their API would be helpful and I'm surprised one does not exist yet (hint, hint youtubers). We awarded Grintor with 100,000 bits for providing the working code.
Several people suggested coinbase and bitpay. They are easy to use but this wasn't the type of integration we were looking for.
farts2much linked us to a work in progress code https://github.com/jswebdevel/btcbox This project looks promising and we'll keep an eye on it.
Running a full node and bitcoind was an option if we wanted to avoid all 3rd parties, but I don't believe this is a practical solution for everyone.
Again, thank you all for your help and support!
submitted by antiquesons to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: ItalyInformatica top posts from 2016-08-25 to 2019-02-25 09:37 PDT

Period: 914.09 days
Submissions Comments
Total 1000 14232
Rate (per day) 1.09 15.57
Unique Redditors 449 1815
Combined Score 19223 38406

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 935 points, 46 submissions: fen0x
    1. Ho trovato questo su un sito di un'azienda che fa web-marketing e mi ha fatto sorridere (122 points, 2 comments)
    2. Then... (73 points, 1 comment)
    3. Pubblicato exploit per grave vulnerabilità nel kernel Linux (46 points, 2 comments)
    4. Arrestato per truffa il capo di Eolo, uso illecito di frequenze non assegnate (44 points, 8 comments)
    5. Un saluto al sub dalla Mecca del nerdismo mondiale (35 points, 14 comments)
    6. Ma quale coding, a scuola serve la vera informatica: per innovare il Paese (34 points, 48 comments)
    7. Informatica, il coding non basta. Formeremmo solo operai digitali (33 points, 47 comments)
    8. Difesa e attacco a Las Vegas, sfida tra hacker da tutto il mondo. Italiani favoriti (32 points, 6 comments)
    9. [Questi mi pare di conoscerli] Giovani e breakdancer, ecco la nazionale italiana di hacker che ci difenderà nella guerra informatica (30 points, 2 comments)
    10. Una collezione di bash script per gli usi più disparati (29 points, 5 comments)
  2. 445 points, 23 submissions: Mte90
    1. Wikipedia in Italiano è chiusa per la legge sul copyright europea! (66 points, 3 comments)
    2. How I developed a captcha cracker for my University's website (40 points, 0 comments)
    3. Italian Anti-Corruption Authority (ANAC) Adopts Onion Services (31 points, 1 comment)
    4. Come Firefox è tornato ad essere veloce e meglio di prima [Inglese] (25 points, 43 comments)
    5. Siti italiani che salvano la tua password in chiaro o la inviano via email [3 giorni dopo] (25 points, 25 comments)
    6. Sono Mte90 alias Daniele Scasciafratte e siccome mi annoiavo ho deciso di diventare un contributor open source, AMA! (24 points, 50 comments)
    7. Cos'è la licenza EUPL e perché dovresti sapere della sua esistenza - Industria Italiana del Software Libero (23 points, 7 comments)
    8. Come contribuire alla comunità open source? - Industria Italiana del Software Libero (21 points, 5 comments)
    9. Industria Italiana del Software Libero aderisce alla campagna "Public Money, Public Code" (20 points, 0 comments)
    10. Il buono, il brutto e il cattivo #digitale — AD 2018 era #postPiacentini (19 points, 1 comment)
  3. 325 points, 20 submissions: Jianlucah
    1. [timendum] I testi generati, ovvero le catene di Markov (29 points, 18 comments)
    2. [denvit, blackdev1l, CapacitorSet] L’ascesa di Mastodon, il social network FOSS e decentralizzato (26 points, 11 comments)
    3. [zolixes] Crackare password? Facciamolo! (24 points, 6 comments)
    4. Dopo Stockisti chiuso anche Taocomputer: evasione di 2,5 milioni per il sito triestino (21 points, 16 comments)
    5. TL;DR inizia così (20 points, 20 comments)
    6. [GTKplusplus] La stampa 3D in ambito consumer, vista da un appassionato (20 points, 19 comments)
    7. Dopo qualche giorno di lavoro posso finalmente dirlo: è nato /ItalyGames! (19 points, 19 comments)
    8. E finalmente, Flash, ce lo siamo tolti di mezzo! (18 points, 16 comments)
    9. ULTIME NOTIZIE! TL;DR HA BISOGNO DI VOI! (15 points, 9 comments)
    10. [nierro] Clight, demone utente per linux scritto in C (15 points, 14 comments)
  4. 322 points, 16 submissions: vitalijzad
    1. Definizione di backup (92 points, 5 comments)
    2. Mickey Mouse Hacks a Military Computer (25 points, 3 comments)
    3. Quando ti mettono fretta prima di fare un rilascio in produzione (23 points, 14 comments)
    4. Ubuntu 18.04 sarà basato su Gnome e non Unity (23 points, 10 comments)
    5. We' waglio', vuoi venire a lavorare nella mia startup? (22 points, 5 comments)
    6. [ENG] Il quotidiano Guardian passa da MongoDB a PostgreSQL (19 points, 28 comments)
    7. Kotlin è ora ufficialmente supportato su Android come linguaggio di programmazione (17 points, 25 comments)
    8. Sedicenne irrompe nei server Apple e ruba 90 GB di dati sensibili (16 points, 6 comments)
    9. Spiò per 13 anni le vite degli altri via computer. Studente dell’Ohio accusato di aver infettato i dispositivi di centinaia di persone per spiarne ogni attività (16 points, 4 comments)
    10. WikiLeaks svela tre tool sviluppati dalla CIA per controllare Mac e Linux (16 points, 2 comments)
  5. 305 points, 11 submissions: mlazzarotto
    1. Massiccia lista di password violate rese pubbliche. Sono più di 1 miliardo di combinazioni username/password. (59 points, 45 comments)
    2. This is how the VPN works (53 points, 5 comments)
    3. Bohemian Rhapsody suonata da Floppy Drives e HDD (42 points, 3 comments)
    4. [x-post from /programmerhumor] Slick WPA2 workaround (35 points, 1 comment)
    5. Ci sono 9 milioni di telecamere Xiongmai accessibili a chiunque (25 points, 8 comments)
    6. Hard coding (20 points, 1 comment)
    7. Buon Sysadmin Day a tutti! (18 points, 0 comments)
    8. DuckDuck Go, cresce il motore di ricerca che non ti spia - Tom's Hardware (18 points, 3 comments)
    9. ODROID-GO è una console portatile programmabile e compatibile con Arduino (14 points, 4 comments)
    10. Amazon vuole le chiavi di casa. Ecco Key: il fattorino apre, consegna e se ne va - Repubblica.it (11 points, 11 comments)
  6. 277 points, 21 submissions: KarlFiabeschi
    1. You can't just code a gif (41 points, 7 comments)
    2. Public Money, Public Code (21 points, 9 comments)
    3. Rtv: Browse Reddit from your terminal (18 points, 11 comments)
    4. Why does man print "gimme gimme gimme" at 00:30? (16 points, 0 comments)
    5. Automate the Boring Stuff with Python (15 points, 3 comments)
    6. Best Vim Configuration and Plug-ins for Web Development (13 points, 3 comments)
    7. EU Will Vote on a Motion That Recommends Banning Kaspersky Products From Official EU Networks (13 points, 1 comment)
    8. Interactive Vim tutorial (13 points, 3 comments)
    9. AMD to consider Coreboot/Libreboot support. Contact AMD!!! Let them know there is demand. (x-post linux) (12 points, 2 comments)
    10. Pi-Hole - a black hole for internet adv (12 points, 16 comments)
  7. 262 points, 8 submissions: ilfabri
    1. Who really is AI. (85 points, 6 comments)
    2. Non ho resistito a questa stupidata. (80 points, 6 comments)
    3. Deploy in production made in RAI. (40 points, 4 comments)
    4. Referendum Lombardia, i tablet per il voto inutilizzabili per gli alunni: "Sono voting machine e pesano due chili" (17 points, 27 comments)
    5. [1969] Margaret Hamilton, lead software engineer of the Apollo Project, stands next to the code she wrote by hand and that was used to take humanity to the moon. (14 points, 3 comments)
    6. Che font usate nel vostro IDE? (10 points, 14 comments)
    7. Microsoft joins the Linux Foundation (9 points, 9 comments)
    8. Cosa ne pensate di Snap? (7 points, 8 comments)
  8. 253 points, 9 submissions: gioxx_it
    1. TNTVillage spiegato bene (le indagini, gli approfondimenti, ecc.) (111 points, 29 comments)
    2. Thunderbird offrirà tante nuove funzionalità nel corso del 2019 (36 points, 29 comments)
    3. How I hacked hundreds of companies through their helpdesk (27 points, 3 comments)
    4. Scoperte due app nel Play Store di Google che rubavano dati bancari (22 points, 18 comments)
    5. mkcert: valid HTTPS certificates for localhost (16 points, 3 comments)
    6. Di video compromettenti, riscatti Bitcoin e ondate di phishing (Aggiornato) (14 points, 1 comment)
    7. (Mail in stile "meglio tardi che mai"): 2014 Trakt Data Breach (11 points, 2 comments)
    8. Cinque fornitori di hosting web soffrivano di gravi vulnerabilità (8 points, 2 comments)
    9. Do Not Track: la funzionalità è morta e vi spieghiamo perché (8 points, 5 comments)
  9. 251 points, 5 submissions: timendum
    1. 10 year challenge per i siti (182 points, 10 comments)
    2. La nuova versione di Google Chrome potrebbe bloccare gli Ad Block (29 points, 75 comments)
    3. L'avvento del codice 2018 (14 points, 144 comments)
    4. SistemaTS: Inserimento spese sanitarie 730 in Python [OC] (14 points, 1 comment)
    5. C'è un effetto collaterale del Gdpr: rende Google sempre più forte (12 points, 8 comments)
  10. 249 points, 8 submissions: Chobeat
    1. Guida anti-inculata per laureandi italiani in Informatica e Ingegneria informatica (125 points, 9 comments)
    2. Il Machine Learning spiegato ad una giraffa (34 points, 24 comments)
    3. Aether: tipo Reddit, ma completamente Peer To Peer (rilasciata questo weekend la prima build) (32 points, 12 comments)
    4. I Tech Worker americani si stanno sindacalizzando (14 points, 0 comments)
    5. Il Machine Learning spiegato ad una giraffa (13 points, 9 comments)
    6. Gocce di Big Data: Spark (12 points, 1 comment)
    7. Our 2019 Developer Survey is Open to Coders Everywhere! - Stack Overflow Blog (12 points, 0 comments)
    8. Gocce di Big Data: Hadoop. Breve introduzione per neofiti al software che ha fatto la storia dei Big Data. (7 points, 5 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. fen0x (1149 points, 431 comments)
  2. alerighi (559 points, 241 comments)
  3. toyg (449 points, 160 comments)
  4. Chobeat (442 points, 110 comments)
  5. lormayna (421 points, 181 comments)
  6. JackHeuston (367 points, 99 comments)
  7. LelixSuper (333 points, 143 comments)
  8. lestofante (326 points, 143 comments)
  9. KarlFiabeschi (325 points, 149 comments)
  10. mhackeroni (320 points, 48 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. DOSTUPNO l'anti Whatsapp: una storia surreale by Lo_acker (233 points, 73 comments)
  2. [AMA] Siamo i mHACKeroni: la squadra italiana di hacker etici che quest'anno si è qualificata ed ha partecipato al DEF CON CTF. Ask Us Anything! by mhackeroni (206 points, 129 comments)
  3. 10 year challenge per i siti by timendum (182 points, 10 comments)
  4. Guida anti-inculata per laureandi italiani in Informatica e Ingegneria informatica by Chobeat (125 points, 9 comments)
  5. Ho trovato questo su un sito di un'azienda che fa web-marketing e mi ha fatto sorridere by fen0x (122 points, 2 comments)
  6. Una illusione ottica (con spiegazione e codice) by mapio (121 points, 8 comments)
  7. DOSTUPNO: Perché devilapp by d3vil401 (120 points, 49 comments)
  8. Un suggerimento: LAVATEVI! by napolux (113 points, 32 comments)
  9. TNTVillage spiegato bene (le indagini, gli approfondimenti, ecc.) by gioxx_it (111 points, 29 comments)
  10. Quanto guadagna ItalyInformatica? by fabio1618 (98 points, 47 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 80 points: zanzabros's comment in Come scrivete le vostre competenze con linguaggi di programmazione nel CV?
  2. 57 points: fen0x's comment in Apple controlla una scuola?
  3. 54 points: send_me_a_naked_pic's comment in Italia paese peggiore per sviluppatori
  4. 53 points: MonsieurCellophane's comment in Esistono programmatori non nerd?
  5. 52 points: GrimGrumbler's comment in Italia paese peggiore per sviluppatori
  6. 51 points: BifrostBOT's comment in La risposta di Dostupno (comunicato stampa in fondo all'articolo)
  7. 51 points: IceStationZebra93's comment in Oggi ho visto cose che voi umani... (pt2)
  8. 51 points: mhackeroni's comment in [AMA] Siamo i mHACKeroni: la squadra italiana di hacker etici che quest'anno si è qualificata ed ha partecipato al DEF CON CTF. Ask Us Anything!
  9. 48 points: edomindful's comment in Scoperte due app nel Play Store di Google che rubavano dati bancari
  10. 45 points: ajanty's comment in 90K al mese?
Generated with BBoe's Subreddit Stats
submitted by subreddit_stats to subreddit_stats [link] [comments]

Format test, ignore

Original post by rethink-your-strategy on Bitcointalk.org here
This post has been reformatted to share on Reddit. What once was common knowledge, is now gone. You want a quality history lesson? Share this like wildfire.
August 15, 2014, 08:15:37 AM

Preamble

I'd like to start off by stating categorically that the cryptography presented by CryptoNote is completely, entirely solid. It has been vetted and looked over by fucking clever cryptographers/developers/wizards such as gmaxwell. Monero have had a group of independent mathematicians and cryptographers peer-reviewing the whitepaper (their annotations are here, and one of their reviews is here), and this same group of mathematicians and cryptographers is now reviewing the implementation of the cryptography in the Monero codebase. Many well known Bitcoin developers have already had a cursory look through the code to establish its validity. It is safe to say that, barring more exotic attacks that have to be mitigated over time as they are invented/discovered, and barring a CryptoNote implementation making rash decisions to implement something that reduces the anonymity set, the CryptoNote currencies are all cryptographically unlinkable and untraceable.
Two other things I should mention. I curse a lot when I'm angry (and scams like this make me angry). Second, where used my short date format is day/month/year (smallest to biggest).
If you find this information useful, a little donation would go a long way. Bitcoin address is 1rysLufu4qdVBRDyrf8ZjXy1nM19smTWd.

The Alleged CryptoNote/Bytecoin Story

CryptoNote is a new cryptocurrency protocol. It builds on some of the Bitcoin founding principles, but it adds to them. There are aspects of it that are truly well thought through and, in a sense, quite revolutionary. CryptoNote claim to have started working on their project years ago after Bitcoin's release, and I do not doubt the validity of this claim...clearly there's a lot of work and effort that went into this. The story as Bytecoin and CryptoNote claim it to be is as follows:
They developed the code for the principles expressed in their whitepaper, and in April, 2012, they released Bytecoin. All of the copyright messages in Bytecoin's code are "copyright the CryptoNote Developers", so clearly they are one and the same as the Bytecoin developers. In December 2012, they released their CryptoNote v1 whitepaper. In September 2013, they released their CryptoNote v2 whitepaper. In November 2013, the first piece of the Bytecoin code was first pushed to Github by "amjuarez", with a "Copyright (c) 2013 amjuarez" copyright notice. This was changed to "Copyright (c) 2013 Antonio Juarez" on March 3rd, 2014. By this juncture only the crypto libraries had been pushed up to github. Then, on March 4th, 2014, "amjuarez" pushed the rest of the code up to github, with the README strangely referring to "cybernote", even though the code referred to "Cryptonote". The copyrights all pointed to "the Cryptonote developers", and the "Antonio Juarez" copyright and license file was removed. Within a few days, "DStrange" stumbled across the bytecoin.org website when trying to mine on the bte.minefor.co.in pool (a pool for the-other-Bytecoin, BTE, not the-new-Bytecoin, BCN), and the rest is history as we know it. By this time Bytecoin had had a little over 80% of its total emission mined.

Immediate Red Flags

The first thing that is a red flag in all of this is that nobody, and I mean no-fucking-body, is a known entity. "Antonio Juarez" is not a known entity, "DStrange" is not a known entity, none of the made up names on the Bytecoin website exist (they've since removed their "team" page, see below), none of the made up names on the CryptoNote website exist (Johannes Meier, Maurice Planck, Max Jameson, Brandon Hawking, Catherine Erwin, Albert Werner, Marec Plíškov). If they're pseudonyms, then say so. If they're real names, then who the fuck are they??? Cryptographers, mathematicians, and computer scientists are well known - they have published papers or at least have commented on articles of interest. Many of them have their own github repos and Twitter feeds, and are a presence in the cryptocurrency community.
The other immediate red flag is that nobody, and I mean no-fucking-body, had heard of Bytecoin. Those that had heard of it thought it was the crummy SHA-256 Bitcoin clone that was a flop in the market. Bytecoin's claim that it had existed "on the deep web" for 2 years was not well received, because not a single vendor, user, miner, drug addict, drug seller, porn broker, fake ID card manufacturer, student who bought a fake ID card to get into bars, libertarian, libertard, cryptographer, Tor developer, Freenet developer, i2p developer, pedophile, or anyone else that is a known person - even just known on the Internet - had ever encountered "Bytecoin" on Tor. Ever. Nobody.

Indisputable Facts

Before I start with some conjecture and educated guesswork, I'd like to focus on an indisputable fact that obliterates any trust in both Bytecoin's and CryptoNote's bullshit story. Note, again, that I do not doubt the efficacy of the mathematics and cryptography behind CryptoNote, nor do I think there are backdoors in the code. What I do know for a fact is that the people behind CryptoNote and Bytecoin have actively deceived the Bitcoin and cryptocurrency community, and that makes them untrustworthy now and in the future. If you believe in the fundamentals in CryptoNote, then you need simply use a CryptoNote-derived cryptocurrency that is demonstrably independent of CryptoNote and Bytecoin's influence. Don't worry, I go into this a little later.
So as discussed, there were these two whitepapers that I linked to earlier. Just in case they try remove them, here is the v1 whitepaper and the v2 whitepaper mirrored on Archive.org. This v1/v2 whitepaper thing has been discussed at length on the Bytecoin forum thread, and the PGP signature on the files has been confirmed as being valid. When you open the respective PDFs you'll notice the valid signatures in them:
signature in the v1 whitepaper
signature in the v2 whitepaper
These are valid Adobe signatures, signed on 15/12/2012 and 17/10/2013 respectively. Here's where it gets interesting. When we inspect this file in Adobe Acrobat we get a little more information on the signature
.
Notice the bit that says "Signing time is from the clock on the signer's computer"? Now normally you would use a Timestamp Authority (TSA) to validate your system time. There are enough public, free, RFC 3161 compatible TSAs that this is not a difficult thing. CryptoNote chose not do this. But we have no reason to doubt the time on the signature, right guys? crickets
.
See these references from the v1 whitepaper footnotes? Those two also appear in the v2 whitepaperth. Neither of those two footnotes refer to anything in the main body of the v1 whitepaper's text, they're non-existent (in the v2 whitepaper they are used in text). The problem, though, is that the Bitcointalk post linked in the footnote is not from early 2012 (proof screenshot is authentic: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=196259.0)
.
May 5, 2013. The footnote is referencing a post that did not exist until then. And yet we are to believe that the whitepaper was signed on 12/12/2012! What sort of fucking fools do they take us for?
A little bit of extra digging validates this further. The document properties for both the v1 whitepaper as well as the v2 whitepaper confirms they were made in TeX Live 2013, which did not exist on 12/12/2012. The XMP properties are also quite revealing
XMP properties for the v1 whitepaper
XMP properties for the v2 whitepaper
According to that, the v1 whitepaper PDF was created on 10/04/2014, and the v2 whitepaper was created on 13/03/2014. And yet both of these documents were then modified in the past (when they were signed). Clearly the CryptoNote/Bytecoin developers are so advanced they also have a time machine, right?
Final confirmation that these creation dates are correct are revealed those XMP properties. The properties on both documents confirm that the PDF itself was generated from the LaTeX source using pdfTeX-1.40.14 (the pdf:Producer property). Now pdfTeX is a very old piece of software that isn't updated very often, so the minor version (the .14 part) is important.
.
pdfTeX 1.40.14 pushed to source repo on Feb 14, 2014
.
This version of pdfTeX was only pushed to the pdfTeX source repository on February 14, 2014, although it was included in a very early version of TeX Live 2013 (version 2013.20130523-1) that was released on May 23, 2013. The earliest mentions on the Internet of this version of pdfTeX are in two Stack Exchange comments that confirm its general availability at the end of May 2013 (here and here).
The conclusion we draw from this is that the CryptoNote developers, as clever as they were, intentionally deceived everyone into believing that the CryptoNote whitepapers were signed in 2012 and 2013, when the reality is that the v2 whitepaper was created in March, 2014, and the v1 whitepaper haphazardly created a month later by stripping bits out of the v2 whitepaper (accidentally leaving dead footnotes in).
Why would they create this fake v2 whitepaper in the first place? Why not just create a v1 whitepaper, or not even version it at all? The answer is simple: they wanted to lend credence and validity to the Bytecoin "2 years on the darkweb" claim so that everyone involved in CryptoNote and Bytecoin could profit from the 2 year fake mine of 82% of Bytecoin. What they didn't expect is the market to say "no thank you" to their premine scam.

And Now for Some Conjecture

As I mentioned earlier, the Bytecoin "team" page disappeared. I know it exists, because "AtomicDoge" referred to it as saying that one of the Bytecoin developers is a professor at Princeton. I called them out on it, and within a week the page had disappeared. Fucking cowards.
That was the event that triggered my desire to dig deeper and uncover the fuckery. As I discovered more and more oddities, fake accounts, trolling, and outright falsehoods, I wondered how deep the rabbit hole went. My starting point was DStrange. This is the account on Bitcointalk that "discovered" Bytecoin accidentally a mere 6 days after the first working iteration of the code was pushed to Github, purely by chance when mining a nearly dead currency on a tiny and virtually unheard of mining pool. He has subsequently appointed himself the representative of Bytecoin, or something similar. The whole thing is so badly scripted it's worse than a Spanish soap opera...I can't tell who Mr. Gonzales, the chief surgeon, is going to fuck next.
At the same time as DStrange made his "fuck me accidental discovery", another Bitcointalk account flared up to also "accidentally discover this weird thing that has randomly been discovered": Rias. What's interesting about both the "Rias" and "DStrange" accounts are their late 2013 creation date (October 31, 2013, and December 23, 2013, respectively), and yet they lay dormant until suddenly, out of the blue, on January 20th/21st they started posting. If you look at their early posts side by side you can even see the clustering: Rias, DStrange.
At any rate, the DStrange account "discovering" Bytecoin is beyond hilarious, especially with the Rias account chiming in to make the discovery seem natural. Knowing what we unmistakably do about the fake CryptoNote PDF dates lets us see this in a whole new light.
Of course, as has been pointed out before, the Bytecoin website did not exist in its "discovered" form until sometime between November 13, 2013 (when it was last captured as this random picture of a college girl) and February 25, 2014 (when it suddenly had the website on it as "discovered"). This can be confirmed by looking at the captures on Wayback Machine: https://web.archive.org/web/*/http://bytecoin.org
The CryptoNote website, too, did not exist in its current form until after October 20, 2013, at which time it was still the home of an encrypted message project by Alain Meier, a founding member of the Stanford Bitcoin Group and co-founder of BlockScore. This, too, can be confirmed on Wayback Machine: https://web.archive.org/web/*/http://cryptonote.org
~It's hard to ascertain whether Alain had anything to do with CryptoNote or Bytecoin. It's certainly conceivable that the whitepaper was put together by him and other members of the Stanford Bitcoin Group, and the timeline fits, given that the group only formed around March 2013. More info on the people in the group can be found on their site, and determining if they played a role is something you can do in your own time.~
Update: Alain Meier posted in this thread, and followed it up with a Tweet, confirming that he has nothing to do with CryptoNote and all the related...stuff.

Batshit Insane

The Bytecoin guys revel in creating and using sockpuppet accounts. Remember that conversation where "Rias" asked who would put v1 on a whitepaper with no v2 out, and AlexGR said "a forward looking individual"? The conversation took place on May 30, and was repeated verbatim by shill accounts on Reddit on August 4 (also, screenshot in case they take it down).
Those two obvious sockpuppet/shill accounts also take delight in bashing Monero in the Monero sub-reddit (here are snippets from WhiteDynomite and cheri0). Literally the only thing these sockpuppets do, day in and day out, is make the Bytecoin sub-reddit look like it's trafficked, and spew angry bullshit all over the Monero sub-reddit. Fucking batshit insane - who the fuck has time for that? Clearly they're pissy that nobody has fallen for their scam. Oh, and did I mention that all of these sockpuppets have a late January/early February creation date? Because that's not fucking obvious at all.
And let's not forget that most recently the sockpuppets claimed that multi-sig is "a new revolutionary technology, it was discovered a short time ago and Bytecoin already implemented it". What the actual fuck. If you think that's bad, you're missing out on the best part of all: the Bytecoin shills claim that Bytecoin is actually Satoshi Nakamoto's work. I'm not fucking kidding you. For your viewing pleasure...I present to you...the Bytecoin Batshit Insane Circus:
.
https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=512747.msg8354977#msg8354977
.
Seriously. Not only is this insulting as fuck to Satoshi Nakamoto, but it's insulting as fuck to our intelligence. And yet the fun doesn't stop there, folks! I present to you...the centerpiece of this Bytecoin Batshit Insane Circus exhibit...
.
Of course! How could we have missed it! The clues were there all along! The CryptoNote/Bytecoin developers are actually aliens! Fuck me on a pogostick, this is the sort of stuff that results in people getting committed to the loony bin.
One last thing: without doing too much language analysis (which is mostly supposition and bullshit), it's easy to see common grammar and spelling fuck ups. My personal favorite is the "Is it true?" question. You can see it in the Bytecoin thread asking if it's Satoshi's second project, in the Monero thread asking if the Monero devs use a botnet to fake demand, and in the Dashcoin thread confirming the donation address (for a coin whose only claim is that they copy Bytecoin perfectly, what the fuck do they need donations for??).

Layer After Layer

One of the things that happened soon after the Bytecoin "big reveal" was a string of forks popping up. The first was Bitmonero on April 18. Fantomcoin was launched May 6. Quazarcoin was launched May 8. HoneyPenny was announced on April 21, although only launched as Boolberry on May 17. duckNote was launched on May 30. MonetaVerde as launched June 17.
Now for some reason unbeknownst to anyone with who isn't a retarded fuckface, the Bytecoin code was pushed up to SourceForge on 08/04/2014 (the "Registered" date is at the bottom of the page). I have no idea why they did this, maybe it's to try and lend credence to their bullshit story (oh hey, look how old Bytecoin is, it's even on Sourceforge!)
Coincidentally, and completely unrelated (hurr durr), Quazarcoin, Fantomcoin, and Monetaverde are all also on Sourceforge. This gives us a frame of reference and a common link between them - it's quite clear that at least these three are run by the same team as CryptoNote. There is further anecdotal evidence that can be gathered by looking at the shill posts in the threads (especially the way the Moneteverda shills praise merge mining, in a way that is nearly fucking indistinguishable from the Bytecoin praise for multi-sig technology).
QuazarCoin is a special case and deserves a little attention. Let's start with OracionSeis, who launched it. He's well known on Bitcointalk for selling in-game currencies. In that same thread you'll notice this gem right at the end from Fullbuster: "Hey,OracionSeis is no longer under my use so please https://bitcointa.lk/threads/selling-most-of-the-game-currencies.301540/#post-5996983 come into this thread! thank you !" Click through to his new link and Fullbuster clarifies: "Hello, I may look new around here but i've sold my first account and created new one and i have an intention to keep the same services running as my first account did." So now that we know that OracionSeis is a fucking bought account, we can look at his actions a little more critically.
On May 7, just when Monero was being taken back by the community (see below), OracionSeis out of the blue decided to take it overelaunch it himself. This included a now-defunct website at monero.co.in, and a since-abandoned Github. The community pushed back hard, true to form, with hard-hitting statements such as "To reiterate, this is not the original devs, and thus not a relaunch. OP, fuck you for trying this. This should warrant a ban." A man after my own heart. OracionSeis caved and decided to rename it to...QuazarCoin, which launched on May 8. To recap: bought account, launched by trying to "relaunch" Monero, got fucked up, renamed it to QuazarCoin. Clearly and undeniably goes in our pile of fuckface coins.
The other three are a little more interesting. Let's start with ~fuckNote~duckNote. It's hard to say if duckNote is a CryptoNote/Bytecoin project. The addition of the HTML based wallet is a one-trick pony, a common thread among most of the CryptoNote/Bytecoin controlled coins, but that could also be the result of a not-entirely-retarded developer. Given the shill posts in the duckNote thread I'm going to flag it as possibly-controlled-by-the-fuckface-brigade.
And now we come to ~HoneyPenny~ ~MoneyPenny~ ~HoneyBerry~ ~Boolean~ Boolberry. This is an interesting one. This was "pre-announced" on April 21, although it was only released with the genesis block on May 17. This puts it fourth in line, after Fantomcoin and Quazarcoin, although fucktarded proponents of the shittily-named currency insist that it was launched on April 21 because of a pre-announcement. Fucking rejects from the Pool of Stupidity, some of them. At any rate, "cryptozoidberg" is the prolific coder that churned out a Keccak-derived PoW (Wild Keccak) in a month, and then proceeded to add completely fucking retarded features like address aliasing that requires you to mine a block to get an address (lulz) and will never cause any issues when "google" or "obama" or "zuckerberg" want their alias back. Namecoin gets around this by forcing you to renew every ~200 - 250 days, and besides, nobody is making payments to microsoft.bit. This aliasing system is another atypical one-trick-pony that the CryptoNote developers push out and claim is monumental and historical and amazing.
There's also the matter of cryptozoidberg's nickname. In the Bytecoin code there's the BYTECOIN_NETWORK identifiert, which according to the comment is "Bender's nightmare" (hurr durr, such funny, 11100111110001011011001210110110 has a 2 in it). Now this may be a little bit of conjecture, yo, but the same comment appears twice in the "epee" contributed library, once in the levin signature, and again in the portable storage signature. The contexts are so disconnected and different that it would be a fucking stretch to imagine that the same person did not write both of these. We can also rule out this being a Bytecoin-specific change, as the "Bender's nightmare" comments exist in the original epee library on githubw (which is completely unused anywhere on the planet except in Bytecoin, most unusual for a library that has any usefulness, and was first committed to github on February 9, 2014).
We know from the copyright that Andrey N. Sabelnikov is the epee author, and we can say with reasonable certainty that he was involved in Bytecoin's creation and is the dev behind Boolberry. Sabelnikov is quite famous - he wrote the Kelihos botnet code and worked at two Russian security firms, Microsoft took him to court for his involvement (accusing him of operating the botnet as well), and then settled with him out of court on the basis of him not running the botnet but just having written the code. Kelihos is a botnet that pumped out online pharmacy spam (you know the fucking annoying "Y-ou Ne3D Vi-4Gra!?" emails? those.) so it's good to see he transitioned from that to a cryptocurrency scam. Regardless of BBR's claim to have "fixed" CryptoNote's privacy (and the fake fight on Bitcointalk between the "Bytecoin devs" and cryptozoidberg), it's clear that the link between them is not transparent. BBR is either the brainchild of a spam botnet author that worked on Bytecoin, or it's the CryptoNote developers trying to have one currency distanced from the rest so that they have a claim for legitimacy. I think it's the second one, and don't want to enter into a fucking debate about it. Make up your own mind.
Which brings us to the oddest story of the bunch: Bitmonero. It's pretty clear, given its early launch date and how unfamiliar anyone was with creating a genesis block or working in completely undocumented code, that thankful_for_today is/was part of the CryptoNote developers. He made a fatal error, though: he thought (just like all the other cryptocurrencies) that being "the dev" made him infallible. Ya know what happened? He tried to force his ideas, the community politely said "fuck you", and Bitmonero was forked into Monero, which is leading the pack of CryptoNote-based coins today. Let me be perfectly fucking clear: it doesn't matter that the Bytecoin/CryptoNote developers know their code and can push stuff out, and it doesn't matter that Sabelnikov can shovel bullshit features into his poorly named cryptocurrency, and it doesn't matter that Monetaverde is "green" and has "merged mining". Nobody working behind these cryptocurrencies is known in the cryptocurrency community, and that alone should be a big fucking red flag. Monero is streets ahead, partly because of the way they're developing the currency, but mostly because the "core devs" or whatever they're called are made up of reasonably well-known people. That there are a bunch of them (6 or 7?) plus a bunch of other people contributing code means that they're sanity checking each other.
And, as we saw, this has fucking infuriated the Bytecoin/CryptoNote developers. They're so angry they waste hours and hours with their Reddit accounts trawling the Monero sub-reddit, for what? Nobody has fallen for their scam, and after my revelation today nobody fucking will. Transparency wins, everything else is bullshit.
As pointed out by canonsburg, when the Bytecoin/CryptoNote people realised they'd lost the fucking game, they took a "scorched earth" approach. If they couldn't have the leading CryptoNote coin...they'd fucking destroy the rest by creating a shit-storm of CryptoNote coins. Not only did they setup a thread with "A complete forking guide to create your own CryptoNote currency", but they even have a dedicated website with a fuckton of JavaScript. Unfortunately this plan hasn't worked for them, because they forgot that nobody gives a fuck, and everyone is going to carry on forking Bitcoin-based coins because of the massive infrastructure and code etc. that works with Bitcoin-based coins.
There are a bunch of other useless CryptoNote coins, by the way: Aeon, Dashcoin, Infinium-8, OneEvilCoin. We saw earlier that Dashcoin is probably another CryptoNote developer driven coin. However, this entire group is not really important enough, nor do they have enough potential, for me to give a single fuck, so make up your own mind. New CryptoNote coins that pop up should be regarded with the utmost caution, given the bullshit capabilities that we've already seen.

All Tied Up in a Bow

I want to cement the relationship between the major CryptoNote shitcoins. I know that my previous section had a lot of conjecture in it, and there's been some insinuation that I'm throwing everyone under the bus because I'm raging against the machine. That's not my style. I'm more of a Katy Perry fan..."you're going to hear me roar". There were some extra links I uncovered during my research, and I lacked the time to add it to this post. Thankfully a little bit of sleep and a can of Monster later have given me the a chance to add this. Let's start with an analysis of the DNS records of the CN coins.
If we look at the whois and DNS records for bytecoin.org, quazarcoin.org, fantomcoin.org, monetaverde.org, cryptonote.org, bytecoiner.org, cryptonotefoundation.org, cryptonotestarter.org, and boolberry.com, we find three common traits, from not-entirely-damming to oh-shiiiiiiit:
  1. There's a lot of commonality with the registrar (NameCheap for almost all of them), the DNS service (HurricaneElectric's Free DNS or NameCheap's DNS), and with the webhost (LibertyVPS, QHosteSecureFastServer.com, etc.)
  2. All of the CN domains use WhoisGuard or similar private registration services.
  3. Every single domain, without exception, uses Zoho for email. The only outlier is bitmonero.org that uses Namecheap's free email forwarding, but it's safe to disregard this as the emails probably just forward to the CryptoNote developers' email.
The instinct may be to disregard this as a fucking convenient coincidence. But it isn't: Zoho used to be a distant second go Google Apps, but has since fallen hopelessly behind. Everyone uses Google Apps or they just use mail forwarding or whatever. With the rest of the points as well, as far-fetched as the link may seem, it's the combination that is unusual and a dead giveaway of the common thread. Just to demonstrate that I'm not "blowing shit out of proportion" I went and checked the records for a handful of coins launched over the past few months to see what they use.
darkcoin.io: mail: Namecheap email forwarding, hosting: Amazon AWS, open registration through NameCheap monero.cc: mail: mail.monero.cc, hosting: behind CloudFlare, open registration through Gandi xc-official.com: mail: Google Apps, hosting: MODX Cloud, hidden registration (DomainsByProxy) through GoDaddy blackcoin.io: mail: Namecheap email forwarding, hosting: behind BlackLotus, open registration through NameCheap bitcoindark.org: mail: no MX records, hosting: Google User Content, open registration through Wix viacoin.org: mail: mx.viacoin.org, hosting: behind CloudFlare, closed registration (ContactPrivacy) through Hostnuke.com neutrinocoin.org: mail: HostGator, hosting: HostGator, open registration through HostGator
There's no common thread between them. Everyone uses different service providers and different platforms. And none of them use Zoho.
My next check was to inspect the web page source code for these sites to find a further link. If you take a look at the main CSS file linked in the source code for monetaverde.org, fantomcoin.org, quazarcoin.org, cryptonotefoundation.org, cryptonote-coin.org, cryptonote.org, bitmonero.org, and bytecoiner.org, we find a CSS reset snippet at the top. It has a comment at the top that says "/* CSS Reset /", and then where it resets/sets the height it has the comment "/ always display scrollbars */". Now, near as I can find, this is a CSS snipped first published by Jake Rocheleau in an article on WebDesignLedger on October 24, 2012 (although confusingly Google seems to think it appeared on plumi.de cnippetz first, but checking archive.org shows that it was only added to that site at the beginning of 2013). It isn't a very popular CSS reset snippet, it got dumped in a couple of gists on Github, and translated and re-published in an article on a Russian website in November, 2012 (let's not go full-blown conspiritard and assume this links "cryptozoidberg" back to this, he's culpable enough on his own).
It's unusual to the point of being fucking impossible for one site to be using this, let alone a whole string of supposedly unrelated sites. Over the past few years the most popular CSS reset scripts have been Eric Meyer's "Reset CSS", HTML5 Doctor CSS Reset, Yahoo! (YUI 3) Reset CSS, Universal Selector ‘’ Reset, and Normalize.css, none of which contain the "/ CSS Reset /" or "/ always display scrollbars */" comments.
You've got to ask yourself a simple question: at what point does the combination of all of these fucking coincidental, completely unusual elements stop being coincidence and start becoming evidence of a real, tenable link? Is it possible that bytecoin.org, quazarcoin.org, fantomcoin.org, monetaverde.org, cryptonote.org, bytecoiner.org, cryptonotefoundation.org, cryptonotestarter.org, and boolberry.com just happen to use similar registrars/DNS providers/web hosts and exactly the fucking same wildly unpopular email provider? And is it also possible that monetaverde.org, fantomcoin.org, quazarcoin.org, cryptonotefoundation.org, cryptonote-coin.org, cryptonote.org, and bytecoin.org just happen to use the same completely unknown, incredibly obscure CSS reset snippet? It's not a conspiracy, it's not a coincidence, it's just another piece of evidence that all of these were spewed out by the same fucking people.

The Conclusion of the Matter

Don't take the last section as any sort of push for Monero. I think it's got potential (certainly much more than the other retarded "anonymous" coins that "developers" are popping out like street children from a cheap ho), and I hold a bit of XMR for shits and giggles, so take that tacit endorsement with a pinch of fucking salt.
The point is this: Bytecoin's 82% premine was definitely the result of a faked blockchain. CryptoNote's whitepaper dates were purposely falsified to back up this bullshit claim. Both Bytecoin and CryptoNote have perpetuated this scam by making up fake website data and all sorts. They further perpetuate it using shill accounts, most notably "DStrange" and "Rias" among others.
They launched a series of cryptocurrencies that should be avoided at all cost: Fantomcoin, Quazarcoin, and Monetaverde. They are likely behind duckNote and Boolberry, but fuck it, it's on your head if you want to deal with scam artists and botnet creators.
They developed amazing technology, and had a pretty decent implementation. They fucked themselves over by being fucking greedy, being utterly retarded, being batshit insane, and trying to create legitimacy where there was none. They lost the minute the community took Monero away from them, and no amount of damage control will save them from their own stupidity.
I expect there to be a fuck-ton of shills posting in this thread (and possibly a few genuine supporters who don't know any better). If you want to discuss or clarify something, cool, let's do that. If you want to have a protracted debate about my conjecture, then fuck off, it's called conjecture for a reason you ignoramus. I don't really give a flying fuck if I got it right or wrong, you're old and ugly enough to make up your own mind.
tl;dr - CryptoNote developers faked dates in whitepapers. Bytecoin faked dates in fake blockchain to facilitate an 82% premine, and CryptoNote backed them up. Bytecoin, Fantomcoin, Quazarcoin, Monetaverde, Dashcoin are all from the same people and should be avoided like the fucking black plague. duckNote and Boolberry are probably from them as well, or are at least just fucking dodgy, and who the fuck cares anyway. Monero would have been fucking dodgy, but the community saved it. Make your own mind up about shit and demand that known people are involved and that there is fucking transparency. End transmission.
Just a reminder that if you found this information useful, a little donation would go a long way. Bitcoin address is 1rysLufu4qdVBRDyrf8ZjXy1nM19smTWd.
submitted by OsrsNeedsF2P to heyfuckyou [link] [comments]

G.M.O. Foods Will Soon Require Labels. What Will the Labels Say?

https://preview.redd.it/n9byp1o4enx01.jpg?width=1024&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=801dbae415de7b110c73a00eef6c2c08c7650a25
The United States Department of Agriculture has proposed new guidelines for labeling foods that contain genetically modified ingredients. Food makers will be required by federal law to use the labels, starting in 2020.
The safety of genetically modified ingredients, widely known as G.M.O.s, remains a source of anxiety for some Americans despite the scientific studies that say they pose no health threat. Many food makers now voluntarily place “No G.M.O.’’ labels on their products as a marketing tactic.
Clarifying how genes are altered in the plants and animals we eat, and whether grocery store shoppers should care, has proved to be a heavy lift. But here are a few answers to questions about the proposed labels.

What is a G.M.O.?

The term stands for “genetically modified organism,’’ and it has traditionally referred to plants and animals created by altering genes with laboratory techniques in ways that conventional forms of breeding can’t, often by inserting genetic material from one species into another.
A gene from a soil bacterium, for instance, makes soybeans immune to a widely used weed killer. A type of papaya has been modified to be resistant to a crippling virus, and corn has been altered to control insects that attack it.
Only a handful of such crops are grown around the world. But some of them, like corn, soybeans and sugar beets, are used in the majority of processed foods that line the aisles of grocery stores, including chips, soda, salad dressing, soups, some breakfast cereals and baked goods. So a lot of foods items stand to bear these labels.

Why are these guidelines being proposed now?

Major food manufacturers have fought long and expensive battles against G.M.O. labels, worried that they would deter customers — and give an advantage to organic food makers, who lobbied to advance labeling legislation and ballot measures in several states. (Under U.S.D.A. guidelines, organic foods may not contain genetically engineered ingredients.)
In recent years, legislators and consumer groups have stepped up efforts to pass labeling laws, with bills or ballot initiatives appearing in California, Connecticut, Maine, Oregon and Washington. After Vermont became the first state to pass a labeling law, in 2014, food makers faced the expense and logistical hurdles of retooling their packaging for one market — with others potentially on the horizon.
Some manufacturers announced that they would voluntarily place labels on their genetically engineered foods nationwide. Others agreed to push for legislation that would impose a nationwide standard — with provisions like a QR or bar code that consumers could scan with mobile phones, and a term, “bioengineered,” that they preferred. Those efforts turned into a federal labeling bill signed into law by President Barack Obama in 2016. The U.S.D.A. then had to determine just what those labels would look like.

What will the proposed labels say?

Instead of the commonly used but somewhat stigmatized terms “G.M.O.’’ and “genetically engineered,” the guidelines propose labels that say “bioengineered” or “BE.” Food makers would be given a choice of three disclosure methods: spelling out the information, as in “contains a bioengineered food ingredient”; using a standard icon (the agency proposed several evoking sun and smiles); or affixing a QR code that directs consumers to a website with more information.
https://preview.redd.it/0hw89sz8enx01.jpg?width=1024&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=018e9207eeb77e972f59bf80e1701ce3550f8748

Do the labels cover all genetically engineered foods?

No. New gene-editing technologies let scientists tweak the DNA of plants and animals with great speed and precision, often by deleting a snippet of genetic information, or by inserting a desirable trait from one breed into another of the same species. Crops that contain such changes, which could theoretically be achieved through conventional breeding, or occur through a natural mutation, are excluded from the proposed labels.
The labels may also exempt highly refined sugars and oils, like those made from genetically modified sugar beets and corn, which typically contain no genetic material after being processed. Consumer groups oppose that move, which could significantly curtail the number of foods that carry the label, saying that it’s not just what we ingest that matters but how food is produced. Foods whose primary ingredient is non-G.M.O. meat, like beef stew, also don’t have to be labeled, even if they contain other genetically engineered ingredients.
Source

Cryptocurrency #ICO #Blockchain #TokenSale #agrotechfarm #Token #AI #coin #bonus #platform #bitcoin #ethereum #crypto #currencies #project #ATF #cryptotrading #icoinvest #iconews #technology #agrotechnology #ecology #organicfood #organicindustry #Labels #GMO #USA #plants #genes

submitted by AgroTechFarmICO to u/AgroTechFarmICO [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: PowerShell top posts from 2016-09-13 to 2017-09-12 15:08 PDT

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    1. How To Create Progress Bars in PowerShell (118 points, 12 comments)
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    3. How to Version and Publish a PowerShell Module to GitHub and PSGallery with AppVeyor (42 points, 0 comments)
    4. Managing Owners of Files and Folders with PowerShell (33 points, 4 comments)
    5. How to upload Custom Images to Microsoft Azure using PowerShell (29 points, 0 comments)
    6. Working with Arrays in PowerShell (28 points, 12 comments)
    7. Get Windows 10 digital license with Powershell (26 points, 7 comments)
    8. PowerShell Script to Load Balance DNS Server Search Order (25 points, 3 comments)
    9. PowerShell – where, .where or Where? (24 points, 6 comments)
    10. How To Grep in PowerShell (23 points, 43 comments)
  9. 473 points, 16 submissions: fourierswager
    1. In light of PowerShell Core, what's your plan for refactoring old stuff and writing new stuff? (57 points, 44 comments)
    2. WinRM-Environment Module - Make your remote PSSession environment the same as your local session. Plus the ability to edit files within the PowerShell console. (50 points, 7 comments)
    3. Start-SudoSession - Sudo for PowerShell written in 100% PowerShell! (42 points, 14 comments)
    4. Register-FileIOWatcher - function to montior one or more files and/or subdirectories for changes. (38 points, 5 comments)
    5. Get-UserSessionEx - Get all user session info in one place...for real though. (36 points, 5 comments)
    6. ManageLocalUsersAndGroups Module Significant Update: Now capable of managing local users and groups on Remote Hosts on different domains (or not on a domain at all) (36 points, 2 comments)
    7. Vi/Nano for PowerShell? (35 points, 30 comments)
    8. Start-PSLogging - Capture logs for ALL PowerShell activity on a system. (32 points, 7 comments)
    9. Replace-Text powerful, easy-to-use function. (24 points, 3 comments)
    10. EncryptDecrypt Module - Hybrid RSA/AES Encryption solution with PowerShell. Please use responsibly. (22 points, 1 comment)
  10. 439 points, 11 submissions: PowerShellChallenge
    1. Installing latest PowerShell Core 6.0 Release on Linux just got easier! (69 points, 14 comments)
    2. Windows Management Framework (WMF) 5.1 now in Microsoft Update Catalog (60 points, 3 comments)
    3. PSSwagger – Automatically generate PowerShell cmdlets from OpenAPI (f.k.a Swagger) specification (56 points, 2 comments)
    4. PowerShell 6.0 Roadmap: CoreCLR, Backwards Compatibility, and More! (53 points, 9 comments)
    5. Join the PowerShell 10th Anniversary Celebration! (48 points, 2 comments)
    6. OpenSSH Security Testing Kick Off (47 points, 1 comment)
    7. PowerShell Open Source Community Dashboard (24 points, 1 comment)
    8. Managing Security Settings on Nano Server with DSC (23 points, 3 comments)
    9. Windows PowerShell 2.0 Deprecation (21 points, 4 comments)
    10. Code Coverage – Part 2 (19 points, 0 comments)
  11. 417 points, 6 submissions: thebeersgoodnbelgium
    1. dbatools - an open source project, now with over 100 PowerShell commands for DBAs. Here's our most recent release! • /SQLServer (123 points, 1 comment)
    2. I'm presenting tomorrow! PowerShell ❤ SQL Server: Modern Database Administration with dbatools & dbareports (83 points, 12 comments)
    3. Official SqlServer module now in the PowerShell Gallery! (83 points, 16 comments)
    4. If all goes well, the SQL Server module will be in the PowerShell Gallery in the next month! (80 points, 25 comments)
    5. we just added 63 commands to a beta dbatools release - help us test, please? :D (27 points, 8 comments)
    6. Rejoice! dbatools now helps with SPN management: Get-DbaSpn, Set-DbaSpn, Test-DbaSpn & Remove-DbaSpn • /SQLServer (21 points, 0 comments)
  12. 414 points, 13 submissions: ramblingcookiemonste
    1. What have you done with PowerShell this month? July 2017 (53 points, 83 comments)
    2. What have you done with PowerShell this month? March 2017 (51 points, 69 comments)
    3. What have you done with PowerShell this month? June 2017 (41 points, 84 comments)
    4. What have you done with PowerShell this month? April 2017 (40 points, 46 comments)
    5. What have you done with PowerShell this month? January 2017 (33 points, 54 comments)
    6. What have you done with PowerShell this month? November 2016 (33 points, 51 comments)
    7. 2016 Retrospection: What have you done with PowerShell this year? (31 points, 25 comments)
    8. What have you done with PowerShell this month? October 2016 (27 points, 68 comments)
    9. What have you done with PowerShell this month? August 2017 (25 points, 45 comments)
    10. What have you done with PowerShell this month? September 2016 (24 points, 40 comments)
  13. 408 points, 8 submissions: oze4
    1. Install a Powershell Script .ps1 as a Windows Service! GUI that allows you to install and run a Powershell script as a Windows Service! (With example .ps1 you can run as a service) (129 points, 50 comments)
    2. Run PowerShell Script (.ps1) as a Windows Service! (88 points, 49 comments)
    3. GUI Tool For Enabling/Disabling AD Accounts & Reset PWs! (59 points, 40 comments)
    4. Custom "Windows Explorer" for Powershell GUI scripts (51 points, 3 comments)
    5. Is there a way to tell when windows is at the login screen after boot via power shell? (23 points, 11 comments)
    6. How to install a PowerShell script as a Windows Service. GUI Edition! ~PaaWS: PowerShell as a Windows Service~ with bonus uninstaller (20 points, 6 comments)
    7. Get permissions for specific Active Directory user - even if they are in a Group! (19 points, 0 comments)
    8. Log your pings! (19 points, 18 comments)
  14. 402 points, 9 submissions: happysysadm
    1. A PowerShell function to rapidly gather system events for sysadmin eyes only with some tips (92 points, 24 comments)
    2. Is WinRM Secure or do I need HTTPs? (63 points, 7 comments)
    3. Getting weather data with PowerShell and other funny things you can do in just a line of code (59 points, 0 comments)
    4. Ramp up your PowerShell knowledge in 2017 with these books (52 points, 8 comments)
    5. Announcing the winner of the PowerShell Oneliner Contest 2016 (43 points, 10 comments)
    6. The new way to check computer information with PowerShell and WMF 5.1 (30 points, 15 comments)
    7. Do you think you know PowerShell? Code Golf - Find Next Palindrome Number (26 points, 6 comments)
    8. Using the PoshRSJob module with a PowerShell function to perform a WinRM check up (20 points, 0 comments)
    9. All the 7 principles of the LEAN methodology in a single line of PowerShell code (17 points, 21 comments)
  15. 367 points, 4 submissions: mikefrobbins
    1. How to install Visual Studio Code and configure it as a replacement for the PowerShell ISE (144 points, 44 comments)
    2. Announcing a new book: PowerShell 101 – The No-Nonsense Beginner’s Guide to PowerShell (106 points, 3 comments)
    3. Use PowerShell to Determine if Specific Windows Updates are Installed on Remote Servers (78 points, 18 comments)
    4. PowerShell One-Liner to Disable Active Directory Accounts and Log the Results to a SQL Server Database (39 points, 6 comments)
  16. 331 points, 7 submissions: signalwarrant
    1. PowerShell Desired State Configuration (DSC) How-To for Beginners (Pull Mode) (87 points, 7 comments)
    2. Hey PowerShell... Text me when the Domain Admins Group changes. (75 points, 13 comments)
    3. Fellow PowerShell wizards... You need version control in your life. (43 points, 11 comments)
    4. Create an HTML report of Active Directory Forest Information with PowerShell (42 points, 4 comments)
    5. PowerShell Desired State Configuration (DSC) How-To for Beginners (Push Model) (39 points, 3 comments)
    6. Automate Creating Lab Virtual Machines in Azure with PowerShell (26 points, 3 comments)
    7. Convert text files to PDF then merge PDFs in bulk with PowerShell and iTextSharp (19 points, 6 comments)
  17. 324 points, 6 submissions: ColeMcDonald
    1. Learn Powershell in 5 Painless Steps: 4 - Loops (87 points, 11 comments)
    2. Learn Powershell in 5 Painless Steps - Part 3: Input (63 points, 2 comments)
    3. Learn Powershell in 5 Painless Steps: Data - Classes and Storage (63 points, 4 comments)
    4. Here's the second step on our journey to world domination through scripting. (40 points, 12 comments)
    5. Learn Powershell in 5 Painless Steps - 5 - Decisions (40 points, 6 comments)
    6. Learn Powershell in 5 Painless Steps: Data - 3.Movement... This week, classes and methods move around in another dimension... or something like that. (31 points, 0 comments)
  18. 265 points, 6 submissions: jerdub1993
    1. PowerShell for beginners video training course as taught by its inventor, Jeffery Snover. (145 points, 8 comments)
    2. Change all AD usernames to firstname.lastname and rename home directory. (34 points, 13 comments)
    3. Query IMDB for movies and information. (32 points, 10 comments)
    4. Is it possible to use PowerShell to get information from an online account if you provide the credentials? (ie: Facebook, email, Reddit inbox?) (24 points, 12 comments)
    5. Help piping multiple values by property name? (15 points, 14 comments)
    6. Is it possible to test a command without running it? (15 points, 11 comments)
  19. 259 points, 3 submissions: nickrod518
    1. Never too busy to have fun... send cat facts to coworker's PC's using PowerShell (183 points, 20 comments)
    2. Migrate Windows user profile(s) from one computer to another or to an archive (57 points, 20 comments)
    3. Create a price chart of Bitcoin from the last 30 days (19 points, 7 comments)
  20. 242 points, 2 submissions: blownart
    1. 10 Free PowerShell e-books (187 points, 16 comments)
    2. PowerShell 10 Year Anniversary (55 points, 9 comments)
  21. 230 points, 1 submission: bigbirdtoejam
    1. Using powershell for office pranks (230 points, 86 comments)
  22. 215 points, 5 submissions: kabanossi
    1. Learn basics of PowerShell & PowerCLI under 1.5 hours (76 points, 2 comments)
    2. The Top 3 Features in Visual Studio Code for PowerShell Folks (74 points, 20 comments)
    3. Powershell Script to Get ESXi Datastore Path Information (27 points, 4 comments)
    4. vCenter Cluster Performance Tool (21 points, 0 comments)
    5. Making sure your Citrix Desktops are utilized in 35 lines of PoSH (17 points, 0 comments)
  23. 214 points, 1 submission: pmd006
    1. Not what I expected (214 points, 33 comments)
  24. 213 points, 6 submissions: 1RedOne
    1. Extracting and monitoring web content with PowerShell (45 points, 19 comments)
    2. POWERSHELL DECONSTRUCTED - A deep dive into how binary modules work (44 points, 20 comments)
    3. SOLVED: What happens to WINRM when certs die (37 points, 19 comments)
    4. Adding tab-completion to your PowerShell Functions (36 points, 15 comments)
    5. Advanced Autocompletion - Part II (30 points, 16 comments)
    6. Building a DSC Design application with PowerShell (21 points, 8 comments)
  25. 183 points, 4 submissions: AdminArsenal
    1. Happy Star Wars Day, /PowerShell (77 points, 2 comments)
    2. Creating a Hipster Playlist Using PowerShell (42 points, 4 comments)
    3. Anyone looking for a full-time PowerShell position? (39 points, 55 comments)
    4. Determining Disk Type with Get-PhysicalDisk (25 points, 3 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. markekraus (1517 points, 465 comments)
  2. Lee_Dailey (1044 points, 590 comments)
  3. KevMar (899 points, 297 comments)
  4. ihaxr (404 points, 84 comments)
  5. daviwil (287 points, 75 comments)
  6. spyingwind (285 points, 94 comments)
  7. Sheppard_Ra (277 points, 103 comments)
  8. ka-splam (265 points, 85 comments)
  9. JBear_Alpha (255 points, 102 comments)
  10. jheinikel (254 points, 62 comments)
  11. SeeminglyScience (230 points, 74 comments)
  12. SaladProblems (222 points, 92 comments)
  13. Swarfega (207 points, 64 comments)
  14. OathOfFeanor (198 points, 71 comments)
  15. Snak3d0c (191 points, 110 comments)
  16. root-node (188 points, 66 comments)
  17. evetsleep (188 points, 59 comments)
  18. gangstanthony (188 points, 55 comments)
  19. ramblingcookiemonste (165 points, 29 comments)
  20. fourierswager (161 points, 75 comments)
  21. creamersrealm (158 points, 70 comments)
  22. itmonkey78 (154 points, 38 comments)
  23. artvandelay440 (151 points, 62 comments)
  24. 1RedOne (150 points, 60 comments)
  25. nepronen (148 points, 39 comments)
  26. the_spad (148 points, 33 comments)
  27. Ominusx (139 points, 38 comments)
  28. omers (139 points, 38 comments)
  29. oze4 (135 points, 74 comments)
  30. Old-Lost (132 points, 41 comments)
  31. halbaradkenafin (127 points, 38 comments)
  32. alinroc (127 points, 19 comments)
  33. cml0401 (126 points, 41 comments)
  34. icklicksick (125 points, 45 comments)
  35. KnifeyGavin (124 points, 42 comments)
  36. michaeltlombardi (120 points, 63 comments)
  37. aXenoWhat (119 points, 48 comments)
  38. toregroneng (117 points, 36 comments)
  39. pertymoose (112 points, 35 comments)
  40. _Unas_ (109 points, 39 comments)
  41. suddenarborealstop (107 points, 40 comments)
  42. allywilson (103 points, 41 comments)
  43. Flyboy (98 points, 13 comments)
  44. cofonseca (97 points, 39 comments)
  45. lordv0ldemort (94 points, 35 comments)
  46. NathanielArnoldR2 (87 points, 31 comments)
  47. chreestopher2 (85 points, 38 comments)
  48. steviecoaster (85 points, 34 comments)
  49. yeah_i_got_skills (85 points, 19 comments)
  50. Emiroda (84 points, 30 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. Free Online PowerShell GUI Designer by nepronen (503 points, 121 comments)
  2. Using powershell for office pranks by bigbirdtoejam (230 points, 86 comments)
  3. Not what I expected by pmd006 (214 points, 33 comments)
  4. 10 Free PowerShell e-books by blownart (187 points, 16 comments)
  5. Announcing the PowerShell Module Browser by tr4p (183 points, 30 comments)
  6. Never too busy to have fun... send cat facts to coworker's PC's using PowerShell by nickrod518 (183 points, 20 comments)
  7. Powershell Cheat Sheet Compilation by Prateeksingh1590 (177 points, 15 comments)
  8. Just released v0.10.0 of the PowerShell extension for Visual Studio Code with an integrated console experience like the ISE! by daviwil (166 points, 47 comments)
  9. Learn Powershell in 5 Painless Steps - Storage by rschiefer (152 points, 13 comments)
  10. Would anyone here like to see content related to Active Directory? by deleted (150 points, 28 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 78 points: screamingpackets's comment in Are there any free alternatives to using Powershell ISE?
  2. 53 points: GenghisChaim's comment in Windows 10 Hardening Via Powershell
  3. 49 points: Alliwantispcb's comment in Using powershell for office pranks
  4. 47 points: scabby_al's comment in Vote to petition native PowerShell support in Microsoft Excel - PowerShell Macros!
  5. 46 points: dbussanich's comment in Does anyone have a job where they only write powershell scripts?
  6. 42 points: nepronen's comment in Free Online PowerShell GUI Designer
  7. 40 points: deleted's comment in PowerShell for private purposes?
  8. 38 points: bukem's comment in $MyInvocation annoys me. What is a foolproof, reliable way to get path of currently run script?
  9. 36 points: Quicknoob's comment in Top 10 powershell scripts you use
  10. 36 points: gdhhorn's comment in Is it possible to test a command without running it?
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Pastecoin - Sell pastes for bitcoin Emmet HTML Snippets in Visual Studio Code - YouTube Code snippets demo in Microsoft Teams - YouTube How to Setup an HTML Snippet in a SharePoint Page - YouTube How to use snippets

Other treasures include the original source code for MS-DOS (the precursor to Microsoft Windows), the open source code that powers Bitcoin, Facebook's React, and the publishing platform Wordpress "The Arctic Code Vault was just the beginning of the GitHub Archive Program's journey to secure the world's open source code," GitHub vice. See full list on bitcoincore. MAC (1978-07-27, 6955 lines ... Bei dem Bitcoin Code handelt es sich um einen automatisierten Algorithmus der eine integrierte Trading-Schnittstelle besitzt. Das Programm versucht das Maximum an Geld, aus einem ideal getimten Investment, zu bekommen. Gut ist es für den Algorithmus, wenn der Kurs viele Schwankungen aufweist und sprunghaft ist, aber auch in stark wachsenden Branchen kann er eingesetzt werden. After the successful execution of the code, the page is loaded with the dashboard header, cryptocurrency values, and the bitcoin ticker. The Bitcoin, Litecoin and Ethereum prices (in USD) are displayed just below the dashboard header. This Bitcoin Ticker gets updated at a fixed interval of 2 seconds. Hovering on the line chart, at every tooltip ... Bitcoin send alert code. GitHub Gist: instantly share code, notes, and snippets. Bitcoin send alert code. GitHub Gist: instantly share code, notes, and snippets. Skip to content. All gists Back to GitHub. Sign in Sign up Instantly share code, notes, and snippets. laanwj / sendalert.cpp. Last active Jul 9, 2018. Star 7 Fork 9 Code Revisions 1 Stars 7 Forks 9. Embed. What would you like to do ... Bitcoin Ticker with HTML, CSS, and JS In Codepad you can find +44,000 free code snippets, HTML5, CSS3, and JS Demos. Collaborate with other web deve...

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Pastecoin - Sell pastes for bitcoin

SharePoint Tips: How to Setup an HTML Snippet in a SharePoint Page for Microsoft SharePoint company intranet users. Please visit our website at http://mydock... Just add the Simple "Bonus" Automatic (or automated) Backlink HTML Code snippet, in order to place a one-way text Back-Link Button on any Web Page that you are trying to promote to get More ... In this video we will create custom visual studio code JavaScript snippets with tabstops, placeholders and choices. We will use a fantastic generator tool at... Shows how to create a snippet in HTML-Kit Tools, and how to insert it into documents. This video shows how to add custom code snippets to the TagsReminder in HTML-Kit Tools.

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