Running Bitcoind – BitcoinWiki

Shift: The Next-Gen Blockchain with Phantom, a Killer dApp for Decentralized Web and File Hosting

Shift is the first next-gen blockchain with a built-in "killer dApp" for decentralized web hosting, called Phantom. We believe this pre-included feature of Shift will drive adoption and stimulate the development of a robust dApp ecosystem on the Shift platform, especially since anyone who knows JavaScript can develop decentralized applications (dApps) that use the Shift platform. Over the past two years, we have created the backbone of a robust dApp ecosystem to disrupt the hosting industry.
[link]

Hostinger Best Web Hosting Review

https://soundcloud.com/user-807100315/hostinger-best-web-hosting-review
Visit at- https://webhostingservice.home.blog/2019/06/02/hostinger-free/
There's no uncertainty that with regards to web hosting, Hostinger is just the least expensive choice accessible today, with costs beginning at $0.99 every month. No other organization figures out how to try and approach. A large portion of them offer a fundamental arrangement for multiple times the cost. Believing that it's unrealistic? It isn't. Yet, let me let you in on a little mystery at this moment. To get the best costs, you'll need to focus on Hostinger for quite a while.
This would be a keen activity – if the administration is really extraordinary. Since your guests couldn't think less about the amount you pay for hosting. They do think about quick stacking speeds, and about really having the option to arrive at your site when they have to. They additionally need to realize that their own information will be secure and ensured.
Could Hostinger offer that? I have my assessments; however I would not like to put together my audit with respect to my supposition alone. As Website Planet is accessible in various dialects, for some odd reason we have web hosting specialists dissipated everywhere on over the world. This was my brilliant chance to play out an enormous scope test, and I chose to do precisely that. We had 30 specialists join to Hostinger and dispatch a neighborhood form of our testing website in 30 distinct nations.
They messed with each accessible element, observed stacking velocities and execution, and even besieged client care with questions. They contrasted the outcomes and other mainstream has, as SiteGround and InterServer. This speedy response to every one of our inquiries is that Hostinger performed strikingly well. In certain nations, similar to Russia, it came in at #4. In others, similar to Israel, Hostinger grabbed the #1 place.
Peruse on for the long answer. I've point by point my full close to home involvement in Hostinger, and I'll disclose precisely how to take advantage of what the organization offers. To perceive how Hostinger looks at to different administrations, look at our rundown of the top web has.
Everything an Amateur Needs

With costs being as low as they may be, my restless character quickly recognized two zones where Hostinger may be attempting to pull one over on me: highlights and execution. Indeed, I'd love to pay half of what the contenders charge, yet I would prefer not to get just 50% of what they give. Fortunately, that wasn't the situation by any means, as Hostinger's arrangements incorporate all that I expected to get moving, from abundant assets to execution boosting apparatuses.

Three shared hosting plans are accessible – Single, Premium, and Business. Each of the three works on head of Hostinger's own special control board, cPanel, which incorporates simple auto establishments of WordPress and many other substances the executive’s frameworks (CMS).

I pursued the essential arrangement, which accompanied 10GB of plate space, 100GB of transfer speed, 1 email record, and backing for a solitary website. It's sufficient assets to construct an entirely good website – consider hundreds pages and a huge number of HD pictures. Certainly enough to grandstand your composition, innovativeness, items, administrations, or whatever you're anticipating hosting.

The two progressed plans accompany boundless data transmission, boundless email accounts, and boundless websites. Some additional advantages that you won't get with the Single arrangement incorporate SSH access for you Linux-sharp designers, boundless sub domains, and boundless information bases. Programmed every day reinforcements are the one basic component that the fundamental arrangement needs, which means you'll need to perform reinforcements physically or buy the administration as a different extra.

Hostinger has an intuitive website manufacturer by the name of Zyro, however it isn't accessible as a component of the hosting plans.

Before we dive further into Hostinger's best highlights, a word on the VPS and cloud plans. Hostinger is above all else a mutual hosting supplier. Try not to be that person who goes to the best pizza joint around and requests pasta. There are has that represent considerable authority in VPS and cloud administrations – Fluid Web and Kinsta, for instance – and keeping in mind that Hostinger's contributions in the field aren't the most exceedingly terrible, there's no motivation to go for them.
cPanel Has All the Fundamental Highlights, yet Does not have Some Serious Ones

As I said previously, Hostinger has built up its own exclusive control board, which means you won't get the chance to play with the dearest cPanel that you know and love. What's that? You don't create enthusiastic connections to hosting control boards? All things considered, you're the bizarre one. At any rate, while cPanel used to be the standard control board you'd get with most has (counting Hostinger), things change. Because of some exhausting venture show that happened some time back, has have been exchanging boards left and right.

cPanel is Hostinger's endeavor into the board world, and you'll see it furnished with all the treats you need. From simple auto establishments and DNS zones setups to email accounts, a record administrator, and MySQL information bases, it's all fundamentally the same as what cPanel offers. However, a few things are unique. For instance, auto establishments in cPanel are finished with Softaculous, which additionally lets you clone your site, set up an arranging variant, and even design a reinforcement plan. cPanel's Auto Installer works admirably at auto-introducing WordPress, yet does not have these valuable additional items.

Progressed email highlights, such as mailing records, channels, and routings, are additionally absent from cPanel. Did I ever really use them myself when they were accessible to me? Truly, never. I don't know who does. Yet, that is cPanel for you – it probably won't be equipped for everything, except it's certainly enough for most clients.
Amazing Reserving On account of the LiteSpeed Web Worker

LiteSpeed isn't the physical metal worker, however the web worker innovation that Hostinger employments. It reliably positions as one of the quickest and most dependable web workers, beating the more seasoned Apache innovation that hosts like GoDaddy despite everything use. You won't need to successfully arrange it. Simply kick back and appreciate the first class execution it conveys, particularly for WordPress websites.

What you can do, and assuredly ought to do, is initiate LiteSpeed's reserving capacity, known as LSCache. Sounds excessively specialized? Indeed, turning on the Programmed Store alternative basically summarizes it. Stored duplicates of your pages will be made, fundamentally slicing conveyance times to guests. Static pages, similar to business pages and portfolios, will profit by this significantly more.

A SSL Declaration that you could conceivably be getting

You need a SSL testament. Regardless of what you think and regardless of what anyone might've let you know – you need a SSL. Why? Since without a SSL authentication to scramble and secure your guests' information, the numerous wrongs prowling on the web will seek it. You'll not exclusively be taking a chance with your undertaking and your guests' wellbeing; however you'll additionally endure a shot on Google's rankings.

Today, Hostinger furnishes a SSL with the entirety of its arrangements. In the metaphorical yesterday, which for my situation was only two or three months back, no testament was given. What will happen tomorrow is impossible to say. Hostinger regularly messes with its arrangement highlights, and I propose that you triple-check and ensure that a SSL is to be sure included with your arrangement. Realize that if a SSL is excluded, it's conceivable to buy one as a different extra. In any case, that shouldn't be the situation. All that Is All around Structured, however you’ll be under Consistent Assault from up sell Pop-Ups.

Laying it out plainly, Hostinger's client experience specialists have designed an awesome interface and client venture, from information exchange to utilizing and dealing with your hosting. Thing is, Hostinger's business methodology depends on continually pushing you to overhaul and buy additional items. It's irritating, best case scenario, and confounding at the very least.

Yet at the same time, the plans are unmistakably spread out, and all Hostinger requests on information exchange is your name, an email address, and a secret word. Yahoo for getting rid of all the insignificant data that different hosts are so enthused about gathering.

Interfacing a Domain and Introducing WordPress

In the wake of buying my arrangement, the time had come to associate a domain and introduce WordPress. I was given the choice to consequently introduce WordPress as a major aspect of the information exchange measure, however I decided to do it the normal way, utilizing the control board itself, to check how Hostinger's apparatuses contrast with what different hosts give.

Presently, my domain was really included with the expectation of complimentary when I bought the Single arrangement, which means it was at that point associated with the hosting. Today, for reasons unknown, just the serious plans accompany a free domain.

In the event that you wind up getting your domain name from another supplier, interfacing it is simple. Nameserver data is promptly accessible at the head of your hosting subtleties page, and you should simply duplicate glue them into your domain board. Shouldn't something be said about WordPress? I opened the Auto Installer instrument, picked WordPress as my CMS of decision, and entered the essential website subtleties. It was much easier than how Softaculous gets things done, and my new website was ready for action inside one moment.
Dealing with Your Hosting with hPanel Is Simple

We've secured the way toward getting your website on the web, however starting here on you'll despite everything use cPanel to make alters and changes to your hosting. Setting up an email account, running manual reinforcements, dealing with the information bases, and the sky is the limit from there, are largely possible through cPanel. How can everything contrast with getting things done with cPanel? Indeed, as I would like to think, it's out and out simpler. hPanel symbols are greater and better sorted out, the interface isn't as jumbled with additional alternatives that you'll never utilize, and the combination with Hostinger's different administrations (uphold, buying additional items, seeing charging) is consistent.
All in all, would we be able to consider it an ideal usability experience? Actually no, not so much. The explanation, as I said previously, is that periodically your work process will be harmed by up sell pop-ups. Think rolling out a basic improvement to your DNS records, just to be welcomed with this:
I didn't "Increase present expectations." I didn't really do anything aside from sign in. Yet, Hostinger is enthusiastic about pushing plan redesigns, and you'll need to consistently be set up to close down these endeavors, of which there are many. Don't count on the possibility that these pop-ups imply that you've by one way or another spent your assets and need to redesign.
Pass on, It's the Quickest Common Hosting Administration We Tried

Speed and uptime that is what I'm searching for. Tragically, shared hosting administrations will in general vacillate in these regions, no doubt. The explanation is that as the name infers, you're offering assets to numerous different clients and their websites – in some cases up to many others. It takes an extraordinary host to adjust everything and stay away from a bottleneck circumstance where everything's moderate and no one's cheerful. I'm extremely glad to report that Hostinger exceeded expectations in the presentation tests, yet it really surpassed each other shared host that we tried, including the top-level SiteGround, FastComet, and InMotion Hosting. The main two has that improved, and just barely, were the superior Fluid Web (Nexcess) and Kinsta. Incidentally, they can cost around 20 fold the amount of as Hostinger.

Just to give you a thought of Hostinger's capacities, the normal stacking season of my completely fledged greeting page was an exceptional 1.56s, and uptime over a couple of long stretches of testing was as much as 99.99%, precisely as guaranteed. I'm going to nerd out and clarify the testing technique and the outcomes in detail, yet on the off chance that you needn't bother with all the specialized data, don't hesitate to avoid ahead to my encounters with Hostinger's help. I'll simply say it again – Hostinger's presentation shook.

As I do with all hosts I test, I stretched out Hostinger the chance to streamline my website and make it quicker. This is something you can (and should) do too – simply approach uphold for help. The operator prompted that I update WordPress and PHP to their most recent forms, and introduce a couple of regular enhancement modules. I actualized the exhortation, and continued with testing.

The testing itself was finished utilizing three apparatuses: GTmetrix Genius, the Sucuri Burden Time Analyzer, and Uptime Robot's Professional arrangement. The Dallas, TX, GTmetrix worker was utilized to quantify speed and advancement scores in the US. Sucuri was utilized for worldwide execution experiences, and Uptime Robot – who could have imagined – for following the website's uptime and accessibility online in rates.
GTmetrix

I ran various GTmetrix tests over a couple of months, totaled the outcomes, and determined the best, slowest, and normal paces. Hostinger indicated a promising normal stacking season of 1.56s. The best recorded time was 1.0s, and the slowest one was 1.9s. Not exclusively is the slowest stacking time well underneath the 3s imprint (where the majority of your guests will likely escape), however the normal scores demonstrate that Hostinger is as solid as anyone might imagine.

You can see that score-wise, we're getting twofold Bs. That is totally satisfactory, yet in addition probably the most noteworthy score I found in my tests. The main thing left to do so as to get full scores is to improve the pictures further.
Sucuri Burden Time Analyzer

As with GTmetrix, I ran Sucuri tests on numerous occasions. Sucuri gives you the stacking speed results for some worldwide areas, and I determined the midpoints of the quickest area (which was obviously in the US, near my server farm), the slowest area (Bangalore, India – the opposite side of the world), and the worldwide normal. The normal for the quickest area was an incredible 0.177s, while even in old fashioned Bangalore the normal was good – 1.11s. The worldwide normal was 0.499s, which earned my website an A worldwide position.

Frankly? I was shocked by these numbers. A worldwide normal of 0.499s is unfathomable for a common host, and everything I did to "streamline" my site was introduce a couple modules. There wasn't so much as a CDN (Content Conveyance System) dynamic. That is LiteSpeed and LSCache for you, women and respectable men. Get it while it's hot.
Uptime Robot

What great are quick speeds if your website has low accessibility? Nothing but bad. Fortunately, Hostinger is keeping it tight with practically immaculate uptime – 99.997% in the course of recent months. I'm proceeding to track and update the outcomes; however coming barely short of 100% is actually what I request from my host.

Uptime ensure shrewd, the circumstance is somewhat extraordinary. There's apparently a 99.99% uptime ensure gave, yet Hostinger has a genuine scrappy lawful clarification of when and how you can get your cash back. It generally seems like "never" to me, and regardless of whether you some way or another fit the bill for a cash back (as exclusively dictated by them), it's a measly 5% of your month to month cost. Goodness, and it's only for store credit. In any case, beside this assurance issue, Hostinger truly blows it out of the recreation center in the exhibition test.
When Extraordinary, Presently… Requires Tolerance

As a long-term client of Hostinger, I've had the delight of testing it over and over… and once more. One of my preferred pieces of the administration used to be the help. There wasn't (and still isn't) any telephone uphold accessible, yet stunning, was live talk a successful method of finding support. Day in and day out help, kept an eye on by experts, and supported by a broad information base of immense extents. The main issue? While the operators used to react in a flash, today they take around 40 minutes to hit you up. In some cases live talk isn't even accessible, and you're moved to some ticket/email framework which I've had next to no karma with.
I'll be totally fair with you about what this implies: it will be you and the information base. You can't rely on having an hour accessible to just stick around, and in any event, when the operators do reply, that is only the start of the cycle. With 3 brief reaction times in the middle of messages, posing some straightforward inquiries can expand into a whole workday.
The Least expensive Long haul Costs Available, by a wide margin

Truly, people, this is the explanation you understand this. While going over the many hosting choices accessible today, Hostinger's costs stick out. That is to say, $0.99 every month? That is excessively modest. What's the trick? Straightforward. Hostinger needs you to pursue a significant stretch of time, and it will give you motivating forces to do as such. Four installment periods are accessible: month to month, yearly, bi-yearly, and quadrennial. That final word implies four years, and it's scarcely utilized in light of the fact that practically no other host approaches you to pursue that long.

Fortunately pursuing four years will net you what's without a doubt the best cost in the market for shared hosting. Different hosts charge a comparable cost for a yearly arrangement. Crunch the numbers yourself. What's the circumstance when pursuing shorter periods? All things considered, bi-yearly and yearly plans aren't costly, yet they're significantly more in accordance with the market normal. Month to month plans accompany an arrangement expense and don't bode well. Worth insightful, up to a SSL is incorporated (check!), the plans are totally comparable to the business standard. There's additionally a 30-day unconditional promise, so you'll have adequate opportunity to test the administration yourself and check whether it's a solid match.
One thing to see during the checkout cycle is that there are a couple of discretionary extra administrations. Fortunately, none of them come pre-checked. I suggest that you skip them all. You can generally include them later at a similar cost, or "convince" a help operator to give you a superior arrangement… dangers of leaving the administration can do something amazing here.
Searching for a free domain?

Now and again it's remembered for the plans; some of the time it isn't. The serious plans normally accompany one when pursuing a year or more. At the point when I joined, a domain was additionally remembered for the fundamental arrangement. Presently it isn't – go figure.
Concerning making installments, notwithstanding the normal charge card and PayPal choices, you'll additionally have the option to pay with bitcoin and different cryptographic forms of money. Whatever your reasons are for needing to have a website secretly, crypto is the best approach to do as such.
Hostinger's reasonable shared hosting plans merit your time, your cash, and your thought. Execution has been shockingly extraordinary, and keeping in mind that it's not the most element pressed contribution around, it has all that you truly need.
Would it be advisable for you to put it all on the line? In case you're constructing a blog, a business page, an individual task, or a comparative little to-medium website, my answer is a resonating yes.
In the event that it's a web based business store you're hoping to fabricate, or a mind boggling administration like an online course gateway, you'll need something more remarkable than shared hosting. It'll cost you, yet Fluid Web and Kinsta are both better prepared for such ventures.
submitted by frenchwillaume to u/frenchwillaume [link] [comments]

Groestlcoin 6th Anniversary Release

Introduction

Dear Groestlers, it goes without saying that 2020 has been a difficult time for millions of people worldwide. The groestlcoin team would like to take this opportunity to wish everyone our best to everyone coping with the direct and indirect effects of COVID-19. Let it bring out the best in us all and show that collectively, we can conquer anything.
The centralised banks and our national governments are facing unprecedented times with interest rates worldwide dropping to record lows in places. Rest assured that this can only strengthen the fundamentals of all decentralised cryptocurrencies and the vision that was seeded with Satoshi's Bitcoin whitepaper over 10 years ago. Despite everything that has been thrown at us this year, the show must go on and the team will still progress and advance to continue the momentum that we have developed over the past 6 years.
In addition to this, we'd like to remind you all that this is Groestlcoin's 6th Birthday release! In terms of price there have been some crazy highs and lows over the years (with highs of around $2.60 and lows of $0.000077!), but in terms of value– Groestlcoin just keeps getting more valuable! In these uncertain times, one thing remains clear – Groestlcoin will keep going and keep innovating regardless. On with what has been worked on and completed over the past few months.

UPDATED - Groestlcoin Core 2.18.2

This is a major release of Groestlcoin Core with many protocol level improvements and code optimizations, featuring the technical equivalent of Bitcoin v0.18.2 but with Groestlcoin-specific patches. On a general level, most of what is new is a new 'Groestlcoin-wallet' tool which is now distributed alongside Groestlcoin Core's other executables.
NOTE: The 'Account' API has been removed from this version which was typically used in some tip bots. Please ensure you check the release notes from 2.17.2 for details on replacing this functionality.

How to Upgrade?

Windows
If you are running an older version, shut it down. Wait until it has completely shut down (which might take a few minutes for older versions), then run the installer.
OSX
If you are running an older version, shut it down. Wait until it has completely shut down (which might take a few minutes for older versions), run the dmg and drag Groestlcoin Core to Applications.
Ubuntu
http://groestlcoin.org/forum/index.php?topic=441.0

Other Linux

http://groestlcoin.org/forum/index.php?topic=97.0

Download

Download the Windows Installer (64 bit) here
Download the Windows Installer (32 bit) here
Download the Windows binaries (64 bit) here
Download the Windows binaries (32 bit) here
Download the OSX Installer here
Download the OSX binaries here
Download the Linux binaries (64 bit) here
Download the Linux binaries (32 bit) here
Download the ARM Linux binaries (64 bit) here
Download the ARM Linux binaries (32 bit) here

Source

ALL NEW - Groestlcoin Moonshine iOS/Android Wallet

Built with React Native, Moonshine utilizes Electrum-GRS's JSON-RPC methods to interact with the Groestlcoin network.
GRS Moonshine's intended use is as a hot wallet. Meaning, your keys are only as safe as the device you install this wallet on. As with any hot wallet, please ensure that you keep only a small, responsible amount of Groestlcoin on it at any given time.

Features

Download

iOS
Android

Source

ALL NEW! – HODL GRS Android Wallet

HODL GRS connects directly to the Groestlcoin network using SPV mode and doesn't rely on servers that can be hacked or disabled.
HODL GRS utilizes AES hardware encryption, app sandboxing, and the latest security features to protect users from malware, browser security holes, and even physical theft. Private keys are stored only in the secure enclave of the user's phone, inaccessible to anyone other than the user.
Simplicity and ease-of-use is the core design principle of HODL GRS. A simple recovery phrase (which we call a Backup Recovery Key) is all that is needed to restore the user's wallet if they ever lose or replace their device. HODL GRS is deterministic, which means the user's balance and transaction history can be recovered just from the backup recovery key.

Features

Download

Main Release (Main Net)
Testnet Release

Source

ALL NEW! – GroestlcoinSeed Savior

Groestlcoin Seed Savior is a tool for recovering BIP39 seed phrases.
This tool is meant to help users with recovering a slightly incorrect Groestlcoin mnemonic phrase (AKA backup or seed). You can enter an existing BIP39 mnemonic and get derived addresses in various formats.
To find out if one of the suggested addresses is the right one, you can click on the suggested address to check the address' transaction history on a block explorer.

Features

Live Version (Not Recommended)

https://www.groestlcoin.org/recovery/

Download

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/mnemonic-recovery/archive/master.zip

Source

ALL NEW! – Vanity Search Vanity Address Generator

NOTE: NVidia GPU or any CPU only. AMD graphics cards will not work with this address generator.
VanitySearch is a command-line Segwit-capable vanity Groestlcoin address generator. Add unique flair when you tell people to send Groestlcoin. Alternatively, VanitySearch can be used to generate random addresses offline.
If you're tired of the random, cryptic addresses generated by regular groestlcoin clients, then VanitySearch is the right choice for you to create a more personalized address.
VanitySearch is a groestlcoin address prefix finder. If you want to generate safe private keys, use the -s option to enter your passphrase which will be used for generating a base key as for BIP38 standard (VanitySearch.exe -s "My PassPhrase" FXPref). You can also use VanitySearch.exe -ps "My PassPhrase" which will add a crypto secure seed to your passphrase.
VanitySearch may not compute a good grid size for your GPU, so try different values using -g option in order to get the best performances. If you want to use GPUs and CPUs together, you may have best performances by keeping one CPU core for handling GPU(s)/CPU exchanges (use -t option to set the number of CPU threads).

Features

Usage

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/VanitySearch#usage

Download

Source

ALL NEW! – Groestlcoin EasyVanity 2020

Groestlcoin EasyVanity 2020 is a windows app built from the ground-up and makes it easier than ever before to create your very own bespoke bech32 address(es) when whilst not connected to the internet.
If you're tired of the random, cryptic bech32 addresses generated by regular Groestlcoin clients, then Groestlcoin EasyVanity2020 is the right choice for you to create a more personalised bech32 address. This 2020 version uses the new VanitySearch to generate not only legacy addresses (F prefix) but also Bech32 addresses (grs1 prefix).

Features

Download

Source

Remastered! – Groestlcoin WPF Desktop Wallet (v2.19.0.18)

Groestlcoin WPF is an alternative full node client with optional lightweight 'thin-client' mode based on WPF. Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) is one of Microsoft's latest approaches to a GUI framework, used with the .NET framework. Its main advantages over the original Groestlcoin client include support for exporting blockchain.dat and including a lite wallet mode.
This wallet was previously deprecated but has been brought back to life with modern standards.

Features

Remastered Improvements

Download

Source

ALL NEW! – BIP39 Key Tool

Groestlcoin BIP39 Key Tool is a GUI interface for generating Groestlcoin public and private keys. It is a standalone tool which can be used offline.

Features

Download

Windows
Linux :
 pip3 install -r requirements.txt python3 bip39\_gui.py 

Source

ALL NEW! – Electrum Personal Server

Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server aims to make using Electrum Groestlcoin wallet more secure and more private. It makes it easy to connect your Electrum-GRS wallet to your own full node.
It is an implementation of the Electrum-grs server protocol which fulfils the specific need of using the Electrum-grs wallet backed by a full node, but without the heavyweight server backend, for a single user. It allows the user to benefit from all Groestlcoin Core's resource-saving features like pruning, blocks only and disabled txindex. All Electrum-GRS's feature-richness like hardware wallet integration, multi-signature wallets, offline signing, seed recovery phrases, coin control and so on can still be used, but connected only to the user's own full node.
Full node wallets are important in Groestlcoin because they are a big part of what makes the system be trust-less. No longer do people have to trust a financial institution like a bank or PayPal, they can run software on their own computers. If Groestlcoin is digital gold, then a full node wallet is your own personal goldsmith who checks for you that received payments are genuine.
Full node wallets are also important for privacy. Using Electrum-GRS under default configuration requires it to send (hashes of) all your Groestlcoin addresses to some server. That server can then easily spy on your transactions. Full node wallets like Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server would download the entire blockchain and scan it for the user's own addresses, and therefore don't reveal to anyone else which Groestlcoin addresses they are interested in.
Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server can also broadcast transactions through Tor which improves privacy by resisting traffic analysis for broadcasted transactions which can link the IP address of the user to the transaction. If enabled this would happen transparently whenever the user simply clicks "Send" on a transaction in Electrum-grs wallet.
Note: Currently Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server can only accept one connection at a time.

Features

Download

Windows
Linux / OSX (Instructions)

Source

UPDATED – Android Wallet 7.38.1 - Main Net + Test Net

The app allows you to send and receive Groestlcoin on your device using QR codes and URI links.
When using this app, please back up your wallet and email them to yourself! This will save your wallet in a password protected file. Then your coins can be retrieved even if you lose your phone.

Changes

Download

Main Net
Main Net (FDroid)
Test Net

Source

UPDATED – Groestlcoin Sentinel 3.5.06 (Android)

Groestlcoin Sentinel is a great solution for anyone who wants the convenience and utility of a hot wallet for receiving payments directly into their cold storage (or hardware wallets).
Sentinel accepts XPUB's, YPUB'S, ZPUB's and individual Groestlcoin address. Once added you will be able to view balances, view transactions, and (in the case of XPUB's, YPUB's and ZPUB's) deterministically generate addresses for that wallet.
Groestlcoin Sentinel is a fork of Groestlcoin Samourai Wallet with all spending and transaction building code removed.

Changes

Download

Source

UPDATED – P2Pool Test Net

Changes

Download

Pre-Hosted Testnet P2Pool is available via http://testp2pool.groestlcoin.org:21330/static/

Source

submitted by Yokomoko_Saleen to groestlcoin [link] [comments]

How can I get this script to work for Litecoin 0.8.7.5?

What would I need to do to get this script to work for Litecoin 0.8.7.5? https://github.com/litecoin-project/litecoin/releases/tag/v0.8.7.5
 class Bitcoin { // Configuration options private $username; private $password; private $proto; private $host; private $port; private $url; private $CACertificate; // Information and debugging public $status; public $error; public $raw_response; public $response; private $id = 0; /** * @param string $username * @param string $password * @param string $host * @param int $port * @param string $proto * @param string $url */ function __construct($username, $password, $host = 'localhost', $port = 8332, $url = null) { $this->username = $username; $this->password = $password; $this->host = $host; $this->port = $port; $this->url = $url; // Set some defaults $this->proto = $host == 'localhost' ? 'http':'https'; $this->CACertificate = null; } /** * @param string|null $certificate */ function setSSL($certificate = null) { $this->proto = 'https'; // force HTTPS $this->CACertificate = $certificate; } function __call($method, $params) { $this->status = null; $this->error = null; $this->raw_response = null; $this->response = null; // If no parameters are passed, this will be an empty array $params = array_values($params); // The ID should be unique for each call $this->id++; // Build the request, it's ok that params might have any empty array $request = json_encode(array( 'method' => $method, 'params' => $params, 'id' => $this->id )); // Build the cURL session $curl = curl_init("{$this->proto}://{$this->username}:{$this->password}@{$this->host}:{$this->port}/{$this->url}"); $options = array( CURLOPT_RETURNTRANSFER => TRUE, CURLOPT_FOLLOWLOCATION => TRUE, CURLOPT_MAXREDIRS => 10, CURLOPT_HTTPHEADER => array('Content-type: application/json'), CURLOPT_POST => TRUE, CURLOPT_POSTFIELDS => $request ); if ($this->proto == 'https') { // If the CA Certificate was specified we change CURL to look for it if ($this->CACertificate != null) { $options[CURLOPT_CAINFO] = $this->CACertificate; $options[CURLOPT_CAPATH] = DIRNAME($this->CACertificate); } else { // If not we need to assume the SSL cannot be verified so we set this flag to FALSE to allow the connection $options[CURLOPT_SSL_VERIFYPEER] = FALSE; } } curl_setopt_array($curl, $options); // Execute the request and decode to an array $this->raw_response = curl_exec($curl); $this->response = json_decode($this->raw_response, TRUE); //error_log('this->response: '. print_r($this->response,true)); // If the status is not 200, something is wrong $this->status = curl_getinfo($curl, CURLINFO_HTTP_CODE); // If there was no error, this will be an empty string $curl_error = curl_error($curl); curl_close($curl); if (!empty($curl_error)) { $this->error = $curl_error; } if ($this->response['error']) { // If bitcoind returned an error, put that in $this->error $this->error = $this->response['error']['message']; } elseif ($this->status != 200) { // If bitcoind didn't return a nice error message, we need to make our own switch ($this->status) { case 400: $this->error = 'HTTP_BAD_REQUEST'; break; case 401: $this->error = 'HTTP_UNAUTHORIZED'; break; case 403: $this->error = 'HTTP_FORBIDDEN'; break; case 404: $this->error = 'HTTP_NOT_FOUND'; break; } } if ($this->error) { return FALSE; } return $this->response['result']; } } /* Address History Interface Class */ class AddressHistory { public $address = null; public $n_tx = 0; public $total_sent = 0; public $total_received = 0; public $balance = 0; public $final_balance = 0; public $txns = array(); public function __construct($txn=null) { if(! is_array($txn)) return null; if(array_key_exists('address', $txn)) $this->address = $txn['address']; if(array_key_exists('n_tx', $txn)) $this->n_tx = $txn['n_tx']; if(array_key_exists('total_sent', $txn)) $this->total_sent = $txn['total_sent']; if(array_key_exists('total_received', $txn))$this->total_received = $txn['total_received']; if(array_key_exists('balance', $txn)) $this->balance = $txn['balance']; if(array_key_exists('final_balance', $txn)) $this->final_balance = $txn['final_balance']; if(is_array($txn['txns'])) { foreach($txn['txns'] as $key => $this_txn) { $new_txn = array( 'hash' => $this_txn['hash'], 'block_height' => $this_txn['block_height'], 'value' => $this_txn['value'], 'spent' => $this_txn['spent'], 'spent_by' => $this_txn['spent_by'], 'confirmations'=> $this_txn['confirmations'] ); $this->txns[$key] = new TransRef($new_txn); } } else { $this->txns = null; } return $this; } } /* Transaction Reference Interface Class */ class TransRef { public $hash; public $block_height; public $value; public $spent; public $spent_by; public $confirmations; public function __construct($txnref=null) { if(! is_array($txnref)) return null; if(array_key_exists('hash', $txnref)) $this->hash = $txnref['hash']; if(array_key_exists('block_height', $txnref)) $this->block_height = $txnref['block_height']; if(array_key_exists('value', $txnref)) $this->value = $txnref['value']; if(array_key_exists('spent', $txnref)) $this->spent = $txnref['spent']; if(array_key_exists('spent_by', $txnref)) $this->spent_by = $txnref['spent_by']; if(array_key_exists('confirmations', $txnref)) $this->confirmations = $txnref['confirmations']; return $this; } } /* CoindRPC - JsonRPC Class to talk to bitcoind */ class CoindRPC extends Bitcoin { public function __construct() { return parent::__construct(WN_RPC_USER, WN_RPC_PASS, WN_RPC_HOST, WN_RPC_PORT); } public function __call($method, $params) { return parent::__call($method, $params); } public function get_address_balance($address, $confirmations=0) { try { $address_info = $this->validateaddress($address); if($address_info['isvalid'] == 1 && $address_info['ismine'] == 1) { $balance = $this->getreceivedbyaddress($address, $confirmations); } if($balance != '') { return floatval($balance); } else { return 0; } } catch (Exception $e) { error_log('error: '. print_r($e->getMessage(),true)); error_log('['.__LINE__.'] : '.__FILE__); } } public function get_address_history($address) { try { $address_info = $this->validateaddress($address); if($address_info['isvalid'] == 1 && $address_info['ismine'] == 1) { //- if only listening to one BTC account //$history = $this->listtransactions(WN_RPC_ACCT); $history = $this->listtransactions(); $txns = array(); $final_balance = $balance = 0; foreach($history as $txn) { if($txn['address'] != $address) continue; $n_tx = $total_received = $total_sent = 0; $n_tx = intval($addr_hist['n_tx']) + 1; switch($txn['category']) { case('receive'): $total_received = $addr_hist['total_received'] += $txn['amount']; $balance = $balance + $txn['amount']; //- can we trust final balance here? do we need more history $final_balance = $final_balance + $txn['amount']; break; case('send'): $total_sent = $addr_hist['total_sent'] += $txn['amount']; $balance = $balance + $txn['amount']; //- can we trust final balance here? do we need more history $final_balance = $final_balance + $txn['amount']; break; } $txns[] = array( 'hash' => $txn['txid'], 'value' => $txn['amount'], 'spent' => $txn['spent'], 'spent_by' => $txn['spent_by'], 'confirmations' => $txn['confirmations'], ); } $addr_hist = array( 'address' => $address, 'n_tx' => $n_tx, 'total_sent' => $total_sent, 'total_received' => $total_received, 'balance' => $balance, 'final_balance' => $final_balance, 'txns' => $txns ); $addr_hist = new AddressHistory($addr_hist); } else { $addr_hist = false; error_log('Address invalid: '.$address); error_log('['.__LINE__.'] : '.__FILE__); } return $addr_hist; } catch (Exception $e) { error_log('error: '. print_r($e->getMessage(),true)); error_log('['.__LINE__.'] : '.__FILE__); } } public function get_transaction($hash) { try { return $this->gettransaction($hash); } catch (Exception $e) { error_log('error: '. print_r($e->getMessage(),true)); error_log('['.__LINE__.'] : '.__FILE__); } } } /* Helper class */ class Helper { public static $api = null; public static $db = null; public function __construct($db, $api) { Helper::$api = $api; Helper::$db = $db; } public static function walletnotify_email($txnhead) { //- bitcoind calls walletnotify on 0 confirmations and 1. //- We only want email to go out on the first call. Otherwise //- if we want only one 1 confrime, change this to //- confirmations == 0) return; if($txnhead['confirmations'] > 0) return; $tmpl = file_get_contents('email.notify.tmpl.html'); foreach($txnhead as $key => $val) { $map['{'.$key.'}'] = $val; } $map['{timestamp}'] = date('Y-m-d H:i:s', WN_GLOBAL_TIMESTAMP); $map['{hostname}'] = php_uname('n'); $html = str_replace(array_keys($map), array_values($map), $tmpl); $txid_short = substr($txnhead['txid'], 0, 4).' .. '.substr($txnhead['txid'], -4); $msg = "=WNotify=". "\ntxid: ".$txid_short. "\nAmt : ".$txnhead['amount']. "\nCmnt: ".$txnhead['comment']. "\nAcct: ".$txnhead['account']. "\nConf: ".$txnhead['confirmations']. "\nCat : ".$txnhead['category']. "\nAddr: ".$txnhead['address']. ""; //- send to carrier's email to SMS gateway if configured if(defined('WN_SMS_ADMIN') && filter_var(WN_SMS_ADMIN, FILTER_VALIDATE_EMAIL)) { Helper::send_email_sms($msg, WN_SMS_ADMIN); } return Helper::send_email($html, 'WN:WalletNotify', WN_EMAIL_ADMIN);; } public static function send_email($msg, $subj, $to) { $headers = 'From: '.WN_EMAIL_FROM."\r\n"; $headers .= "MIME-Version: 1.0\r\n"; $headers .= "Content-Type: text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1\r\n"; if(trim($msg) == '') return false; return mail($to, $subj, $msg, $headers); } public static function send_email_sms($msg, $to) { if(trim($msg) == '') return false; if($to == '') return false; $headers = 'From: '.WN_EMAIL_FROM."\r\n"; return mail($to, null, $msg."\n.", $headers); } } 
submitted by Mjjjokes to cryptodevs [link] [comments]

Happy Halloween! Audit Statuses of Canadian Cryptocurrency Exchanges

Halloween is a wonderful time of year!
Businesses and consumers alike dress up, children go door to door naively asking strangers for candy, and everyone parties celebrating things like death and evil.
In the spirit of Halloween storytelling, let me tell you a scary story.
There once was a Canadian cryptocurrency exchange. It had one of the simplest user interfaces, the CEO was well known in person and trusted throughout the country for over half a decade, and it had several deposit and withdrawal methods. It was the first to register as a money services business and for much of its history, it was one of the most legally compliant exchanges. It even looked to be headed for public listing on the TSX. The exchange operated for 6 years, assuring users that all funds “are stored in cold storage, using some of the most secure cryptographic procedures possible.” Unfortunately, while we celebrate Halloween by dressing up and wearing masks once a year, the wonderful people who brought us this exchange played “dress up” for over half a decade and time will only tell if there are any more “masks” to come off in this story.
There’s no better or more fitting time to explore one of the darkest realities of the Canadian cryptocurrency space - exactly what is backing any of the cryptocurrency on Canadian exchanges. It’s easy to lose sight that there are real people behind these funds. Most people spend most waking hours working for their money. It literally is their lives. Impacts to victims are not just financial, but psychological and social as well. Victims of exchange fraud go through depression, anxiety, and trauma. They lose their trust and faith in humanity. They withdraw from friends and family in shame and humility.
In the spirit of exploring dark and evil things, let’s examine exactly what evidence there is that any of your crypto is backed on any Canadian exchange. This is a continuation of research I’ve been working on since May/June. I hope it will be enlightening and help you better protect your funds that you worked hard for.

I’ve done a detailed analysis of all Canadian exchanges I could find that handle any sort of custody of funds, and grouped them into 3 categories:

Non-Audited Exchanges (“trust us, we haven't spent your money, we promise")

Bitvo - The service “utilizes a proprietary cold storage solution”. Proprietary, as in, definitely better than established non-proprietary solutions. If you can’t withdraw, they “will credit your account for [their] withdrawal fee”. They’re not an MSB that I could find, nor are they audited.
Coinfield - MSB. No audit. Luckily it’s the "most secure trading platform in Canada" - though apparently not the other 150+ countries, including Estonia where they’re based. No matter which country you pick, the “Security” page still says "most secure trading platform in Canada".
Coinsmart - MSB. Not sure what "[i]ndustry leading cold storage" is, but luckily they’re so "accountable to [their] clients, community and to each other" and "committed to being open and honest" that they don’t need any audit.
Coinut - MSB. Also "the most secure cryptocurrency exchange platform". In addition to not using multi-sig and "not us[ing] USB drives, as the online computer may be infected with virus", they also don’t use audits.
Einstein - You can get “your money deposited and withdrawn faster than any other exchange”. As one customer said "With so many hacks and exit scams, it gives me confidence knowing Einstein is backed by hard-working people just like me." Just check the user experience on their subreddit from their "220,000+ satisfied customers".
EZ-BTC - As they said, “All your coins are kept in cold storage. They’re safe.” They have “strong security”. The supposed presence of physical ATMs was one of the strategies to build customer confidence and they promised 9% annual return on stored funds.
NDAX - MSB. Luckily also “Canada’s most secure trading platform” with "fast withdrawals". I couldn’t find any audit but at least there’s a full page risk disclosure and disclaimer. You can sleep peacefully knowing that they’re legally protected.
Netcoins - MSB. The best assurance I could find of solvency is that they “can process large transactions”. Although they don’t waste time with audits or links at the bottom of their website, apparently “[a]ll transactions happen quickly and securely” “within the same day”.
Newton - MSB. “No-fees”! Your funds are stored in the "professional custody" of Balance, which doesn’t appear to be a registered MSB. I couldn't find any audit of the funds but they "audit [their] policies and controls". They "publish the reports", but I couldn't find any reports. Simply storing funds somewhere else doesn’t give any assurance they cover customer balances.
QuadrigaCX - Operated since 2013, with “vast cryptocurrency reserves” right up to the end. "Bitcoins that are funded in QuadrigaCX are stored in cold storage, using some of the most secure cryptographic procedures possible." Their "cryptographic" procedures are so secure that nobody can access any funds, even now!
Shakepay - MSB. Many will trust the raccoon mascot promising “commission-free” trading. No audit found but the “majority of all digital assets on Shakepay are stored securely offline”. Whatever this means, it’s good to know that up to half might not be.

Audited Exchanges ("so and so swears we didn't spend your money, you can trust them, we showed them once before")

Bitbuy - MSB
Coinberry - MSB
Coinsquare - MSB
Kraken - Not a registered MSB in Canada (that I could find)

Proof of Reserves ("here's your money, right here right now on the blockchain, and here's a proof that we included your balance in that total")

Rather than depend on outdated audits (or lack thereof), it’s actually possible to use the blockchain and cryptography to enable a public real-time audit. This can give assurance to every customer that their balances are fully backed. Giving everyone the ability to check the integrity of balances will keep us all safer. It immediately exposes any fraud, and in most major hacking cases there was advanced hacking that went unnoticed ranging from months (Bitgrail), or years (Mt. Gox). Having an aware public reduces the number of people trading on fraudulent exchanges, and can pressure the exchange to shut down trading or resolve the hack faster, so less funds are permanently lost.
To help explain exactly what this is and how it works, I’ve started a detailed tutorial. I did not come up with this algorithm - it was created in 2014 by a guy named Gregory Maxwell. Sometimes cryptography can be hard to understand. Hopefully this tutorial is simple:

< < Take Our Proof of Reserves Tutorial > >


Given what can often be at stake, I had hoped that maybe one of the “audited” exchanges might embrace Proof of Reserves. Sadly I haven’t had any such luck.
Bitbuy:
Coinberry:
Kraken:
As such, the bottom line is that present exchanges don’t want to share public keys and offer the kind of transparency which is necessary to enable customers to know their funds are backed. Attempting to get answers doesn’t reveal them, and I’m left with an unnerving silence not unlike the end of Halloween night, like I’m asking questions nobody should ask.

Having spent the last 8 months of my life watching and being part of a large group of people suffer through a grueling bankruptcy, where we’ll be “lucky” to only lose 90% of our funds, I want this fixed. I don’t want to live in a reality where fraud can happen just buying/selling on the largest and most trusted exchanges. Especially now that I’ve learned blockchain provides the capability for even greater transparency and a level of public audit far beyond even what's possible with fiat.
If you feel the same way, I invite you to join Quadriga Initiative, where we are fighting for a Proof of Reserves future and also enabling businesses to help Quadriga victims with an innovative token recovery project. Every sign-up helps us reach our goal and launch the project!

If any information in this post is incorrect, please let me know so I can fix it! Thanks! I’m happy to update the audit status of any exchange given reasonable evidence, or provide a review of any other custodial exchange I might have missed.
submitted by azoundria2 to QuadrigaInitiative [link] [comments]

Komodo's 2.0 Infographic Contest: 5,000 KMD Grand Prize!

Komodo's 2.0 Infographic Contest: 5,000 KMD Grand Prize!

https://preview.redd.it/0yq7rwnkjdq11.png?width=1500&format=png&auto=webp&s=950dd49d7e1f7f1e421f7074bd030aec064e6ac7
A total prize pool of 7,000 KMD in our infographic contest
Calling all creatives to take part in our infographic contest and compete for a prize of 7,000 KMD. The winning infographic will explain the architecture of Komodo Platform’s technology. Winners will be those who are able to communicate our architecture and tech visually. This contest will run primarily on Reddit, with the exception of resources being posted to Medium and a master twitter thread for submissions on Twitter. You'll find links at the bottom of this post.

Prizes for winning infographics.

Are you a creative designer? Here's what you can win…
  1. A grand prize of 5,000 KMD
  2. Two runner-up prizes of 500 KMD each
  3. Two third-place prizes of 250 KMD each

Prizes for sharing and giving feedback!

Not a designer? That's OK. You can still participate and win! We'll award five lucky winners 100 KMD each for sharing and promoting the contest. Winners will be picked in a raffle. If you'd like to take part click here https://gleam.io/MwMtO/komodos-20-infographic-contest-5000-kmd-grand-prize and share this post with your friends.

Your Goals

  • Create a high-quality infographic that illustrates the genesis of our platform, the working tech that has been created and how Komodo has been built differently, and deliberately, from the very beginning to ensure security, scalability and interoperability. This is why we refer to the architecture, because Komodo was designed to overcome common problems like congestion, governance and attacks that other platforms did not foresee or prevent, from the beginning. This is Komodo DNA.
  • Share your submission far and wide and encourage your friends and followers to vote for you.
  • Encourage feedback, ask questions and make your infographic the best that it can be.

Our Criteria to Judge

Please note that upvotes and shares are not the only criteria we'll use to judge winners. While useful, we will value creativity, good questions and discussion on Reddit highly. When sharing your posts you will score more highly if people comment, provide feedback and are engaged.
  • How well the infographic conveys our working tech, it's core concepts and plans to build on top of it.
  • How well the infographic illustrates our story, purpose and conveys our tech so that it's easy to understand.
  • Constructive discussion, questions and feedback on Reddit that lead to improvement.
  • Sentiment and comments generated across all our social media. This will not include vanity metrics like likes or shares.
  • Upvotes on Reddit for the author's submission post ONLY. All votes will be counted (i.e. doesn't matter which week they were made).
  • Retweets of the submission in our master thread ONLY. Include your handle and a cover image in your submission. This means if you promote yourself on Twitter you ought to promote the tweet with your work in it.

How do you win?

You may submit up to two infographics. By submitting an infographic, you understand Komodo may post and use your submissions on our digital channels during and after the contest. Each infographic must have it's own post.
  • Create a post on Komodo's subreddit using the 'infographic contest' flair.
  • Add the infographic image into the Reddit post.
  • Include your Twitter handle.
  • Include a social media friendly cover image for us to use when we tweet your submission out.
  • Post a link to your submission post here in the comments for all to see.

Contest Timeline Guide (these dates indicative and are subject to change).

  • 7th September. Announcement. If you're reading this on Reddit before the big announcement then well done! You have two extra days before this is announced on Friday.
  • 10th - 21st September. Research and Questions. We will promote the contest, invite questions and requests for resources, in the comments of this master Reddit post (because this means all information and good questions will be visible to all participants).
  • 22nd September. Draft Submissions. Creatives to submit their draft infographics on Reddit. All submissions need to have their own post and then be linked to in the comments of this master post. This is important to remember!
  • 24th - 30th September. Feedback. A period of one week will be devoted to promoting the submissions and asking the community and team to give you feedback.
  • 1st October. Final Submissions.
  • 2nd - 8th October. Voting. A week of promoting your work and at the end we'll count votes, consider feedback and pick our winners.
  • 15th October. Winners Declared. The final decision by judges. Votes and community feedback counts towards judging but do not have final say.

Resources

If you need help please post in this thread, or email [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) with ‘Infographic Contest’ in the subject line.
  1. A list of resources for the Komodo infographic contest including tools to create infographics.
  2. Komodo Platform: Redefining The Architecture Of Blockchain Platforms
  3. A bullet point study aid to help you understand the history of Komodo’s architecture.
  4. Logo Pack https://komodoplatform.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Komodo-Logo-Pack.zip
  5. Mylo's notes on Software & Platform Architecture for Designers in the Infographic Contest
  6. Mylo's Conceptual Model of Architecture
  7. Video: A brief history of our working tech and an animated timeline of the Komodo Platform.
  8. Video: Komodo Atomic Swaps Explained.
Also please let us know if you are, or you know, a good GUI developer because we'd love to hear from them. Ask them to DM ca333#0118 or SHossain#8093 on Discord.

Entries and submissions for the infographic contest. You can click here to see them all in a scrollable thread on Twitter.

25/09/18 - First Round of Feedback

Infographics should use graphical design elements to visually represent the Komodo Architecture Story found here: https://komodoplatform.com/komodo-platform-a-brief-overview/ included in our ‘required reading’. There’s also a bullet point aid: https://medium.com/@benohanlon/bullet-point-aid-to-help-you-the-history-of-komodos-architecture-dced35b29965 you may find useful.
  • We want to stress that the infographic ought to focus on the Architecture story. In the first round we've found many have focused on the five pillars which is a part of it but not the focus.
  • Copy should be short and concise and not dominate the infographic. The idea is to simplify the story and not to copy and paste directly from the story.
  • Colour Palette - avoid heavy usage of the old KMD green and yellow-orange. Would prefer usage of the interim KMD colour palette.
  • Recommended fonts: Montseratt, Roboto, Open Sans, Helvetica, or Arial.
  • Graphical - Imagery should complement the associated copy. Diagrams are encouraged in place of simple icons to explain more complex technology concepts.
  • Interim KMD colour palette
Interim KMD Colour Palette
If you’ve not been included in the first round it’s because the submission hadn’t been made when the team reviewed. Don’t worry though because we’re organising hangouts and further feedback to help.
  • #001 Infographic Link // Reddit Post Link by thesudio. There’s a lot of good points made, however, these would work better if there is a clear narrative and flow to the information being presented. Otherwise, it can be overwhelming and confusing to the reader. The #1 objective is to visually depict the architecture story and how KMD is redefining blockchain platform architecture.
  • #002 Infographic Link // Reddit Post Link by thesudio. We like that there is a clear structure and clear messaging aligned to each of the 5 pillars. However, the infographic should be focused on telling the architecture story vs the pillars.
  • #003 Infographic Link // Reddit Post Link by VolsenVols. Love how you’ve incorporated our existing graphic design elements into the infographic. This is heading in the right direction and the level of copy and content are well balanced. It would be nice to align this closer to the architecture story and to expand on the different layers of our technology using the same style.
  • #004 Infographic Link // Reddit Post Link by dexter_laabo. Needs to tell the architecture story. This looks more like it took information from our current website. “Anonymous” is not a key aspect of our technology that we’re focusing on.
  • #005 Infographic Link // Reddit Post Link by savandra. The visuals are strong but the narrative could be stronger. It would be nice to align this closer to the architecture story and to expand on the different layers of our technology using the same style.
  • #006 Infographic Link // Reddit Post Link by VolsenVols. Team prefers the other submission style in entry #003.
  • #007 Infographic Link // Reddit Post Link by cryptol1. Doesn’t depict the architecture narrative. Inaccurately describes cross-chain tech as “proprietary”. Simplification has the wrong messaging associated, should be white-label focused. This is considered more of a graphics versus an infographic. Needs to be more comprehensive.
  • #008 Infographic Link // Reddit Post Link by pacosenda. We like the unique design style and approach taken. Doesn’t follow the architecture narrative. Should be expanded out as it is a bit short on content with no clear flow or narrative.
  • #009 Infographic Link // Reddit Post Link by jeanetteLine. Great level of detail and thought on the layout and content. Doesn’t, however, cover the architecture story. Would be preferred if the design direction reflects interim colour and style vs. legacy KMD. The roadmap should be avoided. Looks like they borrowed more from the website than the guidelines.
  • #010 Infographic Link // Reddit Post Link by Meyse. Very creative way to explain and layout the content. This could be expanded out more to encompass the entire architecture story. Cross-chain verifications/smart contracts, blockchain bridging need to be incorporated in.
  • #011 Infographic Link // Reddit Post Link by Brenny431. Follows the 5 pillars versus the architecture story. Would prefer stronger visuals and design elements.
  • #012 Infographic Link // Reddit Post Link by ProofDraw. Design elements are good but need to follow architecture story versus 5 pillars.
  • #013 Infographic Link // Reddit Post Link by sayonara_girl. Needs to follow the architecture story.
  • #014 Infographic Link // Reddit Post Link by Limiter02. Good thought has gone into the copy, however, there’s way too much of it. Would prefer stronger visuals and utilizing a more visual storytelling approach. Doesn’t follow the architecture story. Remove the lizard.
  • #015 Infographic Link // Reddit Post Link by piptothemoon. Great thought into visually representing key points. Needs to be expanded out to incorporate the architecture story, but this is heading in the right direction from a visual storytelling POV.
  • #016 Infographic Link // Reddit Post Link by thecryptofoundation. Love the timeline approach, and mostly followed the guidelines and architecture story. Also, like the incorporation of accomplishments at the end. Would like to get the stock imagery used to reflect our interim colour palette. Not all visuals match what is being represented in the copy.
  • #017 Infographic Link // Reddit Post Link by jsteneros. As discussed in the Zoom call, this graphic is really solid but a little heavy on the copy. Would be good to see more visualizations of the info. This graphic hits on some of the important messages (e.g. Komodo is built differently from other blockchain platforms and solves many of the issues that first-gen platforms are struggling with) but it would be great if there was more information about Komodo’s architecture and how Komodo is different from other platforms.
  • #018 Infographic Link // Reddit Post Link by gravigocrypto. This one was also discussed in the Zoom call. Outstanding visuals and overall design. The info follows the architecture story well but could be stronger if the 3 layers of Komodo’s architecture were tied together into one, coherent visual. It’s a challenging task but that’s part of the contest : )
  • #019 Infographic Link // Reddit Post Link by PacoSenda. This is a really creative infographic, which is great! However, we’d really like to see the visuals a bit more in line with fonts and color palette described above in the “First Round of Feedback” section. Also, as with the feedback for many of the infographic submissions, sticking to the Komodo architecture story would be best.
  • #020 Infographic Link // Reddit Post Link by emmanmalaman. The visuals are pretty cool but this one misses most of our core messaging. It would be much stronger if it followed the architecture story and touched on the info provided in this post. There’s definitely potential here but it needs some work.
  • #021 Infographic Link // Reddit Post Link by immimidada. The colors and visuals here are spot-on. It’s also really great that it sets up the problem and then presents the Komodo solution. However, the problem and solution aren’t defined exactly the way we’d like. Check out the architecture narrative to learn more, and try to follow that story a bit more closely.
  • #022 Infographic Link // Reddit Post Link by mohitgfx3. This one is a bit heavy on the KMD logos. We’re really hoping to see a visualization of Komodo’s infrastructure architecture. As with the feedback for many of the infographics, it would be best to re-read Komodo’s architecture story and try to stick to that as much as possible. Using images from the current website is also not a great approach, as we’re preparing to launch a new site in the coming months.
  • #023 Infographic Link // Reddit Post Link by u/sayonara_girl. Some of the visuals are cool! It’s missing the narrative we’re looking for. In general, less copy and more visual storytelling would improve this graphic a lot. We’d like to see a smooth, linear flow of information. Take another look at the architecture story and try to follow that narrative.
  • #024 Infographic Link // Reddit Post Link by brunopugens. This one follows the narrative well! But it’s a little heavy on the copy. It would be much stronger if the architecture was displayed visually, rather than explained with text. Also, the design is cool but it’s difficult to read b/c the perspective of the text is skewed. It’s a really cool idea but might be better to put the text flat for the sake of readability and clarity.

We hosted a round of live feedback sessions via Zoom. The recording is here:

https://soundcloud.com/blockchainists/zoom-call-first-round-of-feedback-for-komodos-infographic-contest#t=3:50

Timeline

The first block in the KMD blockchain was mined just under two years ago, on September 13, 2016 to 9:04 PM. Since then, Komodo has demonstrated a commitment to innovation and established a history of execution.
  • February 21, 2016 — The vision for Komodo Platform is born with jl777’s Declaration of Independence.
  • September 13, 2016 — The first block in the KMD chain is mined.
  • October 15, 2016 — Komodo’s initial coin offering (ICO) is launched.
  • November 20, 2016 — Komodo’s ICO comes to a close with a total of 2,639 BTC raised.
  • January 2017 — The Komodo Mainnet is launched, complete with independent assetchains and delayed Proof of Work security.
  • January 31, 2017 — The KMD coins purchased in the ICO are issued.
  • March 2017 — Komodo’s development team develops one of the first atomic swap protocols.
  • July 2017 — Thousands of atomic swaps are made in a public, observable setting.
  • August 2017 — Private, zero-knowledge trades made possible with Jumblr, Komodo’s native shuffler.
  • October 2017 — Komodo develops a way to make atomic swaps in SPV Mode (“Lite Mode”), thus eliminating the need for traders to download entire blockchains to do atomic swaps.
  • November 2017 — First GUI for Komodo’s atomic-swap-powered decentralized exchange (DEX) is released, making atomic swap trading more accessible than ever before.
  • January 2018 — The mobile version of Agama wallet is released.
  • February 2018 — A public stress test allows 13,900 atomic swaps in a 48 hour period.
  • March 2018Komodo bridges the gap between Bitcoin-protocol-based coins and Ethereum-based ERC-20 tokens, providing support for 95% of coins and tokens in existence.
  • March 2018 — Komodo holds its second annual Notary Node Elections.
  • May 2018 — The world’s first decentralized ICO is held on Komodo Platform.
  • June 2018 — The alpha release of HyperDEX, a new GUI for Komodo’s decentralized exchange, is launched.
  • July 2018 — Komodo enters a partnership with Netcoins, making KMD coins available for purchase with fiat currencies at over 21,000 locations across three continents.
  • July 2018 — Komodo announces the 5 Pillars of Blockchain technology and begins introducing some Komodo 2.0 technology features, like Federated Multi-Chain Syncing and Cross-Chain Smart Contracts.
  • August 2018 — Komodo takes two big steps towards mass adoption, announces a collaboration with Ideas By Nature, an industry-leading blockchain agency, and releases a full briefing on the development on UTXO-based smart contracts.

Achievements

  • Cryptomiso.com is a website that ranks 866 different blockchain projects according to the Github commit history of that project’s most popular repo. Komodo is ranked #1 overall for Github commits over the last 12 months.
  • China's Ministry Research Initiative regularly ranks Komodo in the top 10.
  • Binance CEO highlights Komodo (see this Five Bullet Friday edition for more info).

If you would like to update your post, please edit and add to the post so people can see the different iterations. Entries and submissions for the infographic contest. You can click here to see them all in a scrollable thread on Twitter.

submitted by benohanlon to komodoplatform [link] [comments]

⚡ Lightning Network Megathread ⚡

Last updated 2018-01-29
This post is a collaboration with the Bitcoin community to create a one-stop source for Lightning Network information.
There are still questions in the FAQ that are unanswered, if you know the answer and can provide a source please do so!

⚡What is the Lightning Network? ⚡

Explanations:

Image Explanations:

Specifications / White Papers

Videos

Lightning Network Experts on Reddit

  • starkbot - (Elizabeth Stark - Lightning Labs)
  • roasbeef - (Olaoluwa Osuntokun - Lightning Labs)
  • stile65 - (Alex Akselrod - Lightning Labs)
  • cfromknecht - (Conner Fromknecht - Lightning Labs)
  • RustyReddit - (Rusty Russell - Blockstream)
  • cdecker - (Christian Decker - Blockstream)
  • Dryja - (Tadge Dryja - Digital Currency Initiative)
  • josephpoon - (Joseph Poon)
  • fdrn - (Fabrice Drouin - ACINQ )
  • pmpadiou - (Pierre-Marie Padiou - ACINQ)

Lightning Network Experts on Twitter

  • @starkness - (Elizabeth Stark - Lightning Labs)
  • @roasbeef - (Olaoluwa Osuntokun - Lightning Labs)
  • @stile65 - (Alex Akselrod - Lightning Labs)
  • @bitconner - (Conner Fromknecht - Lightning Labs)
  • @johanth - (Johan Halseth - Lightning Labs)
  • @bvu - (Bryan Vu - Lightning Labs)
  • @rusty_twit - (Rusty Russell - Blockstream)
  • @snyke - (Christian Decker - Blockstream)
  • @JackMallers - (Jack Mallers - Zap)
  • @tdryja - (Tadge Dryja - Digital Currency Initiative)
  • @jcp - (Joseph Poon)
  • @alexbosworth - (Alex Bosworth - yalls.org)

Medium Posts

Learning Resources

Books

Desktop Interfaces

Web Interfaces

Tutorials and resources

Lightning on Testnet

Lightning Wallets

Place a testnet transaction

Altcoin Trading using Lightning

  • ZigZag - Disclaimer You must trust ZigZag to send to Target Address

Lightning on Mainnet

Warning - Testing should be done on Testnet

Atomic Swaps

Developer Documentation and Resources

Lightning implementations

  • LND - Lightning Network Daemon (Golang)
  • eclair - A Scala implementation of the Lightning Network (Scala)
  • c-lightning - A Lightning Network implementation in C
  • lit - Lightning Network node software (Golang)
  • lightning-onion - Onion Routed Micropayments for the Lightning Network (Golang)
  • lightning-integration - Lightning Integration Testing Framework
  • ptarmigan - C++ BOLT-Compliant Lightning Network Implementation [Incomplete]

Libraries

Lightning Network Visualizers/Explorers

Testnet

Mainnet

Payment Processors

  • BTCPay - Next stable version will include Lightning Network

Community

Slack

IRC

Slack Channel

Discord Channel

Miscellaneous

⚡ Lightning FAQs ⚡

If you can answer please PM me and include source if possible. Feel free to help keep these answers up to date and as brief but correct as possible
Is Lightning Bitcoin?
Yes. You pick a peer and after some setup, create a bitcoin transaction to fund the lightning channel; it’ll then take another transaction to close it and release your funds. You and your peer always hold a bitcoin transaction to get your funds whenever you want: just broadcast to the blockchain like normal. In other words, you and your peer create a shared account, and then use Lightning to securely negotiate who gets how much from that shared account, without waiting for the bitcoin blockchain.
Is the Lightning Network open source?
Yes, Lightning is open source. Anyone can review the code (in the same way as the bitcoin code)
Who owns and controls the Lightning Network?
Similar to the bitcoin network, no one will ever own or control the Lightning Network. The code is open source and free for anyone to download and review. Anyone can run a node and be part of the network.
I’ve heard that Lightning transactions are happening “off-chain”…Does that mean that my bitcoin will be removed from the blockchain?
No, your bitcoin will never leave the blockchain. Instead your bitcoin will be held in a multi-signature address as long as your channel stays open. When the channel is closed; the final transaction will be added to the blockchain. “Off-chain” is not a perfect term, but it is used due to the fact that the transfer of ownership is no longer reflected on the blockchain until the channel is closed.
Do I need a constant connection to run a lightning node?
Not necessarily,
Example: A and B have a channel. 1 BTC each. A sends B 0.5 BTC. B sends back 0.25 BTC. Balance should be A = 0.75, B = 1.25. If A gets disconnected, B can publish the first Tx where the balance was A = 0.5 and B = 1.5. If the node B does in fact attempt to cheat by publishing an old state (such as the A=0.5 and B=1.5 state), this cheat can then be detected on-chain and used to steal the cheaters funds, i.e., A can see the closing transaction, notice it's an old one and grab all funds in the channel (A=2, B=0). The time that A has in order to react to the cheating counterparty is given by the CheckLockTimeVerify (CLTV) in the cheating transaction, which is adjustable. So if A foresees that it'll be able to check in about once every 24 hours it'll require that the CLTV is at least that large, if it's once a week then that's fine too. You definitely do not need to be online and watching the chain 24/7, just make sure to check in once in a while before the CLTV expires. Alternatively you can outsource the watch duties, in order to keep the CLTV timeouts low. This can be achieved both with trusted third parties or untrusted ones (watchtowers). In the case of a unilateral close, e.g., you just go offline and never come back, the other endpoint will have to wait for that timeout to expire to get its funds back. So peers might not accept channels with extremely high CLTV timeouts. -- Source
What Are Lightning’s Advantages?
Tiny payments are possible: since fees are proportional to the payment amount, you can pay a fraction of a cent; accounting is even done in thousandths of a satoshi. Payments are settled instantly: the money is sent in the time it takes to cross the network to your destination and back, typically a fraction of a second.
Does Lightning require Segregated Witness?
Yes, but not in theory. You could make a poorer lightning network without it, which has higher risks when establishing channels (you might have to wait a month if things go wrong!), has limited channel lifetime, longer minimum payment expiry times on each hop, is less efficient and has less robust outsourcing. The entire spec as written today assumes segregated witness, as it solves all these problems.
Can I Send Funds From Lightning to a Normal Bitcoin Address?
No, for now. For the first version of the protocol, if you wanted to send a normal bitcoin transaction using your channel, you have to close it, send the funds, then reopen the channel (3 transactions). In future versions, you and your peer would agree to spend out of your lightning channel funds just like a normal bitcoin payment, allowing you to use your lightning wallet like a normal bitcoin wallet.
Can I Make Money Running a Lightning Node?
Not really. Anyone can set up a node, and so it’s a race to the bottom on fees. In practice, we may see the network use a nominal fee and not change very much, which only provides an incremental incentive to route on a node you’re going to use yourself, and not enough to run one merely for fees. Having clients use criteria other than fees (e.g. randomness, diversity) in route selection will also help this.
What is the release date for Lightning on Mainnet?
Lightning is already being tested on the Mainnet Twitter Link but as for a specific date, Jameson Lopp says it best
Would there be any KYC/AML issues with certain nodes?
Nope, because there is no custody ever involved. It's just like forwarding packets. -- Source
What is the delay time for the recipient of a transaction receiving confirmation?
Furthermore, the Lightning Network scales not with the transaction throughput of the underlying blockchain, but with modern data processing and latency limits - payments can be made nearly as quickly as packets can be sent. -- Source
How does the lightning network prevent centralization?
Bitcoin Stack Exchange Answer
What are Channel Factories and how do they work?
Bitcoin Stack Exchange Answer
How does the Lightning network work in simple terms?
Bitcoin Stack Exchange Answer
How are paths found in Lightning Network?
Bitcoin Stack Exchange Answer
How would the lightning network work between exchanges?
Each exchange will get to decide and need to implement the software into their system, but some ideas have been outlined here: Google Doc - Lightning Exchanges
Note that by virtue of the usual benefits of cost-less, instantaneous transactions, lightning will make arbitrage between exchanges much more efficient and thus lead to consistent pricing across exchange that adopt it. -- Source
How do lightning nodes find other lightning nodes?
Stack Exchange Answer
Does every user need to store the state of the complete Lightning Network?
According to Rusty's calculations we should be able to store 1 million nodes in about 100 MB, so that should work even for mobile phones. Beyond that we have some proposals ready to lighten the load on endpoints, but we'll cross that bridge when we get there. -- Source
Would I need to download the complete state every time I open the App and make a payment?
No you'd remember the information from the last time you started the app and only sync the differences. This is not yet implemented, but it shouldn't be too hard to get a preliminary protocol working if that turns out to be a problem. -- Source
What needs to happen for the Lightning Network to be deployed and what can I do as a user to help?
Lightning is based on participants in the network running lightning node software that enables them to interact with other nodes. This does not require being a full bitcoin node, but you will have to run "lnd", "eclair", or one of the other node softwares listed above.
All lightning wallets have node software integrated into them, because that is necessary to create payment channels and conduct payments on the network, but you can also intentionally run lnd or similar for public benefit - e.g. you can hold open payment channels or channels with higher volume, than you need for your own transactions. You would be compensated in modest fees by those who transact across your node with multi-hop payments. -- Source
Is there anyway for someone who isn't a developer to meaningfully contribute?
Sure, you can help write up educational material. You can learn and read more about the tech at http://dev.lightning.community/resources. You can test the various desktop and mobile apps out there (Lightning Desktop, Zap, Eclair apps). -- Source
Do I need to be a miner to be a Lightning Network node?
No -- Source
Do I need to run a full Bitcoin node to run a lightning node?
lit doesn't depend on having your own full node -- it automatically connects to full nodes on the network. -- Source
LND uses a light client mode, so it doesn't require a full node. The name of the light client it uses is called neutrino
How does the lightning network stop "Cheating" (Someone broadcasting an old transaction)?
Upon opening a channel, the two endpoints first agree on a reserve value, below which the channel balance may not drop. This is to make sure that both endpoints always have some skin in the game as rustyreddit puts it :-)
For a cheat to become worth it, the opponent has to be absolutely sure that you cannot retaliate against him during the timeout. So he has to make sure you never ever get network connectivity during that time. Having someone else also watching for channel closures and notifying you, or releasing a canned retaliation, makes this even harder for the attacker. This is because if he misjudged you being truly offline you can retaliate by grabbing all of its funds. Spotty connections, DDoS, and similar will not provide the attacker the necessary guarantees to make cheating worthwhile. Any form of uncertainty about your online status acts as a deterrent to the other endpoint. -- Source
How many times would someone need to open and close their lightning channels?
You typically want to have more than one channel open at any given time for redundancy's sake. And we imagine open and close will probably be automated for the most part. In fact we already have a feature in LND called autopilot that can automatically open channels for a user.
Frequency will depend whether the funds are needed on-chain or more useful on LN. -- Source
Will the lightning network reduce BTC Liquidity due to "locking-up" funds in channels?
Stack Exchange Answer
Can the Lightning Network work on any other cryptocurrency? How?
Stack Exchange Answer
When setting up a Lightning Network Node are fees set for the entire node, or each channel when opened?
You don't really set up a "node" in the sense that anyone with more than one channel can automatically be a node and route payments. Fees on LN can be set by the node, and can change dynamically on the network. -- Source
Can Lightning routing fees be changed dynamically, without closing channels?
Yes but it has to be implemented in the Lightning software being used. -- Source
How can you make sure that there will be routes with large enough balances to handle transactions?
You won't have to do anything. With autopilot enabled, it'll automatically open and close channels based on the availability of the network. -- Source
How does the Lightning Network stop flooding nodes (DDoS) with micro transactions? Is this even an issue?
Stack Exchange Answer

Unanswered Questions

How do on-chain fees work when opening and closing channels? Who pays the fee?
How does the Lightning Network work for mobile users?
What are the best practices for securing a lightning node?
What is a lightning "hub"?
How does lightning handle cross chain (Atomic) swaps?

Special Thanks and Notes

  • Many links found from awesome-lightning-network github
  • Everyone who submitted a question or concern!
  • I'm continuing to format for an easier Mobile experience!
submitted by codedaway to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Hal Finney, while paralyzed by ALS, wrote code for a bitcoin wallet using only his eyes

It's important to remember Bitcoin's roots, and the amazing effort from brilliant people, like Hal, who contributed to this new technology. If you're feeling down, this is an absolute must read. I have it saved, and read it every once in awhile, enjoy.
"And of course the price gyrations of bitcoins are entertaining to me. I have skin in the game. But I came by my bitcoins through luck, with little credit to me. I lived through the crash of 2011. So I've seen it before. Easy come, easy go." - Hal Finney, March 19, 2013, 08:40:02 PM
Bitcoin and me (Hal Finney)
Copied from https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=155054.0
I thought I'd write about the last four years, an eventful time for Bitcoin and me.
For those who don't know me, I'm Hal Finney. I got my start in crypto working on an early version of PGP, working closely with Phil Zimmermann. When Phil decided to start PGP Corporation, I was one of the first hires. I would work on PGP until my retirement. At the same time, I got involved with the Cypherpunks. I ran the first cryptographically based anonymous remailer, among other activities.
Fast forward to late 2008 and the announcement of Bitcoin. I've noticed that cryptographic graybeards (I was in my mid 50's) tend to get cynical. I was more idealistic; I have always loved crypto, the mystery and the paradox of it.
When Satoshi announced Bitcoin on the cryptography mailing list, he got a skeptical reception at best. Cryptographers have seen too many grand schemes by clueless noobs. They tend to have a knee jerk reaction.
I was more positive. I had long been interested in cryptographic payment schemes. Plus I was lucky enough to meet and extensively correspond with both Wei Dai and Nick Szabo, generally acknowledged to have created ideas that would be realized with Bitcoin. I had made an attempt to create my own proof of work based currency, called RPOW. So I found Bitcoin facinating.
When Satoshi announced the first release of the software, I grabbed it right away. I think I was the first person besides Satoshi to run bitcoin. I mined block 70-something, and I was the recipient of the first bitcoin transaction, when Satoshi sent ten coins to me as a test. I carried on an email conversation with Satoshi over the next few days, mostly me reporting bugs and him fixing them.
Today, Satoshi's true identity has become a mystery. But at the time, I thought I was dealing with a young man of Japanese ancestry who was very smart and sincere. I've had the good fortune to know many brilliant people over the course of my life, so I recognize the signs.
After a few days, bitcoin was running pretty stably, so I left it running. Those were the days when difficulty was 1, and you could find blocks with a CPU, not even a GPU. I mined several blocks over the next days. But I turned it off because it made my computer run hot, and the fan noise bothered me. In retrospect, I wish I had kept it up longer, but on the other hand I was extraordinarily lucky to be there at the beginning. It's one of those glass half full half empty things.
The next I heard of Bitcoin was late 2010, when I was surprised to find that it was not only still going, bitcoins actually had monetary value. I dusted off my old wallet, and was relieved to discover that my bitcoins were still there. As the price climbed up to real money, I transferred the coins into an offline wallet, where hopefully they'll be worth something to my heirs.
Speaking of heirs, I got a surprise in 2009, when I was suddenly diagnosed with a fatal disease. I was in the best shape of my life at the start of that year, I'd lost a lot of weight and taken up distance running. I'd run several half marathons, and I was starting to train for a full marathon. I worked my way up to 20+ mile runs, and I thought I was all set. That's when everything went wrong.
My body began to fail. I slurred my speech, lost strength in my hands, and my legs were slow to recover. In August, 2009, I was given the diagnosis of ALS, also called Lou Gehrig's disease, after the famous baseball player who got it.
ALS is a disease that kills moter neurons, which carry signals from the brain to the muscles. It causes first weakness, then gradually increasing paralysis. It is usually fatal in 2 to 5 years. My symptoms were mild at first and I continued to work, but fatigue and voice problems forced me to retire in early 2011. Since then the disease has continued its inexorable progression.
Today, I am essentially paralyzed. I am fed through a tube, and my breathing is assisted through another tube. I operate the computer using a commercial eyetracker system. It also has a speech synthesizer, so this is my voice now. I spend all day in my power wheelchair. I worked up an interface using an arduino so that I can adjust my wheelchair's position using my eyes.
It has been an adjustment, but my life is not too bad. I can still read, listen to music, and watch TV and movies. I recently discovered that I can even write code. It's very slow, probably 50 times slower than I was before. But I still love programming and it gives me goals. Currently I'm working on something Mike Hearn suggested, using the security features of modern processors, designed to support "Trusted Computing", to harden Bitcoin wallets. It's almost ready to release. I just have to do the documentation.
And of course the price gyrations of bitcoins are entertaining to me. I have skin in the game. But I came by my bitcoins through luck, with little credit to me. I lived through the crash of 2011. So I've seen it before. Easy come, easy go.
That's my story. I'm pretty lucky overall. Even with the ALS, my life is very satisfying. But my life expectancy is limited. Those discussions about inheriting your bitcoins are of more than academic interest. My bitcoins are stored in our safe deposit box, and my son and daughter are tech savvy. I think they're safe enough. I'm comfortable with my legacy. [edited slightly] - Hal Finney
submitted by Sk33tshot to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

The History, The Current State And The Future Of NavCoin

The History, The Current State And The Future Of NavCoin

This is it. If you're interested to see what NAV is all about, this is the ultimate guide for you. You will learn about the history of NavCoin and how it evolved. You will learn about the current state and features of NavCoin and you will learn about the exciting new features that are planned and coming up in the (near) future.
So buckle up, this is going to be a long ride!

Table Of Content


Introduction - What is NavCoin?


The History

Introduction
The following chapter will summarize and break down the history of NavCoin in a few sentences. NAV started a long time ago, went through rebrandings and changes of the core team before it became what it is today.

SummerCoin
NavCoin was initially first introduced under the name SummerCoin on April 23 in 2014. SummerCoin was a fork of the Bitcoin blockchain. It used to have a PoW/PoS hybrid algorithm with a block time of 45 seconds.

SummerCoinV2 /NavajoCoin
Soon after the initial launch of SummerCoin, the original developer left and SoopY (soopy452000 on bitcointalk) took over as the main developer and rebranded the project to SummerCoinV2 respectively NavajoCoin and introduced new features.
The name NavajoCoin was chosen in honor of the Navajo Code Talker. The unbreakable Navajo code was used to encrypt highly classified military information and commands and decrypt the same in WW II.
SoopY introduced a technology which allowed sending transactions anonymously and private. This technology was called "Navajo Anonymous Technology". SoopY also released a new wallet and set the Proof of Stake rewards at 10% for the first year, 5% for the second year and 2% for every year after.

NavCoin
On August 12, 2014, Craig (current lead core developer, pakage on bitcointalk) started to get involved with NAV by helping to set up a website [10].
It was officially announced that Craig joined the core team as a "Wallet & Web Developer" on November 06, 2014.
The last tokenswap and restart of the blockchain of NAV happened on May 12, 2016.
Soon later, SoopY stopped showing up and Craig stepped into the role of the lead core developer. Since then, Craig has assembled a strong team with which he built NavCoin into what it is today.
Currently, Craig and the NavCoin Core team is located in New Zealand and they are actively developing many ground-braking features which differentiate NAV from other cryptocurrencies. You will read more about that later in this article.

The Current State

Introduction
The year 2018 has been a thriving year for the NavCoin ecosystem. Despite the USD price of NAV not reflecting it, in 2018 the core team has developed a whole bunch of new features. Also the core content creators published the first official guidelines that function as an orientation guide for community content creators. This chapter will give you an overview of the current team, the features, the prior mentioned guidelines and the community of NavCoin.

Core Team [1]
Last year, the core team has grown alot. It contains of developers, content creators and interns. The core team are employees of Encrypt S, the New Zealand's leading blockchain R&D lab. Encrypt S is developing blockchain solutions since 2014 and values building open-source software highly.

Craig MacGregor - Chief Executive Officer
Craig is the CEO of Encrypt S and the founder of NavCoin. He is one of the world's most experienced blockchain developers. Craig founded NavCoin in 2014 and is developing software for it since then. He has assembled a strong team of like-minded people. Craig also speaks at seminars and conferenced. Some of the companies and conferences he did blockchain education sessions at are Oracle, Xero, Air New Zealand, Blok Tex and trademe. Together with the team, he is also doing a education series on YouTube where he explains upcoming features in-depth for the community.

Alex Vazquez - Chief Technical Officer
Alex is the CTO of Encrypt S and the most active contributor to the NavCoin core Github. He has incredible knowledge of blockchains and proposes and implements solutions for challenges and features. He supports community developers frequently and answers any questions of the community thoroughly. Like Craig, Alex is developing software for the NavCoin ecosystem for a very long time. Alex speaks at universities at times and educates students about the blockchain technology.

Paul Sanderson - Lead Software Engineer
Paul is the Lead Software Engineer at Encrypt S. He has a flair for technology. His technical and management skills are perfectly suited for consultancy and investment advising. He also frequently contributes to the NavCoin core source code.

Rowan Savage - Senior Software Engineer
Rowan is a full stack software engineer with more than a decade experience in developing complex front-end web applications. He joined Encrypt S in February 2018 and has since been involved in the Valence Plattform, the Kauri Wallet and NavCoin Core. You will read more about these feature/projects later.

Carter Xiao - Lead UX/UI Designer
Carter specializes in user-centric design and is also very talented with 3D animation, motion graphics and programming. One of NavCoins core principle is "Simplifying Crypto" and UX/UI is a very important part of that.

Matt Paul - Software Engineer
Like Rowan, Matt is a full stack Software Engineer. He joined the core team in Mai 2017 and has since worked on NavPay, NavPi, the Kauri Wallet and NavCoin Core. Kieren Hyland - Chief Strategy Officer Kieren is one of the employees that are working for Encrypt S for a very long time. He is the CSO and is a digital strategist and growth hacker with a passion for new technology and has a lot of experience in online marketing. Laura Harris - Creative Director Laura has a combination of commercial and creative flair. She manages the social media accounts for NavCoin and ensures, that NavCoins' message is always powerful, relevant and distinctive. John Darby - Content Creator John is an internationally awarded Technology and Financial sector marketing communications specialist. He is one of the Core Content Creators for NavCoin.

Features of NavCoin [2]
The following features are currently available and have been developed in the last months and years. It is sorted from newest to oldest.

Static Block Reward
The soft-fork for the enabling of static block rewards have been accepted and became active recently at 5th January 2019. This means, that the block reward was changed from a percentage based reward to a static reward. This will incentivize the stakers to have their node online 24/7 which increased the security of the network. It also aligns NavCoin with the PoSv3 specification. With this implementation, the yearly inflation will be 3.6% currently and will exponentionally decrease because of the static value of the rewards. Every staked block will now give the staker 2 NAV. Depending on how many people are staking, the yearly percentage varies. With the network weight currently being around 20'000'000 NAV, stakers earn around 10% rewards from staking 24/7.

Cold staking
To provide extra security to participants in the staking process in the NavCoin network, the core team decided to implement cold staking. This allows to store NAV offline and still be able to sign staking inputs. Looking forward, a possible integration into the Ledger Nano S would mean, that one can stake NAV securely from a offline hardware wallet. How cool is that?

OpenAlias
One of the core principle of NAV is to simplify cryptocurrencies. Many non-technical people are deterred from the long, cryptic addresses used in wallets. When sending funds, you have to make sure that every single letter and digit is correct which is nerve-wracking for the average person. NavCoin has implemented OpenAlias, which allows to transform the wallet address into a email-like form. Everyone can register a name like "[[email protected]](mailto:[email protected])". Funds can then be sent to this name, which makes sending crypto much easier and less error-prone.

Community Fund
This is the one big feature I was most excited about. NavCoin core has implemented the first fully decentralized community fund. Acceptance of proposals and release of funds is all approved by the decentralized network. No central authority has access to the fund. The community fund enables everyone to propose their ideas to the NavCoin community and to get paid to implement these ideas. Everyone can propose whatever they like (of course there is a higher rate of success if the proposal contributes to the NavCoin ecosystem ;-)). In fact, this article was sponsored by the NAV-Community by voting "yes" for my proposal. The fund works like this:
For a fee of 50 NAV, everyone can create and present his idea/proposal to the entire NavCoin network. The fee is here to help prevent spam attacks. Proposals can literally be anything - be it development, marketing or anything else you can some up with.
After creating the proposal, everyone contributing to the NavCoin network can then decide if they like the proposal of not. They vote with "Yes" or "No" for the acceptance of the proposal. Voting happens via staking. Every transaction that gets validated by you gives you one vote. This means that the more NAV you are staking, the higher your voting weight is.
The proposal stays in the state "Pending" until it is accepted or rejected. To be accepted, a proposal has to have a participation of at least 50% of all staked blocks and at least 75% of these votes have to be "Yes"-votes. Like-wise to be rejected a proposal need 50% participation of the network and 75% of these votes have to be "No"-votes. Additionally, if a proposal didn't pass after 6 voting cycles (about 6 weeks) it is also rejected.
After a proposal has been accepted, the creator of the proposal can start his work. When the work is finished, or at in the proposal defined checkpoints, the proposal creator can create a payment request for the full or part of the requested funds.
The NavCoin network can then again decide, if the work is what the creator promised to do and vote for the funds or reject the payment request because it was not what he promised. This mechanism ensures, that the funds are only release if the creator of the proposal did what he promised. The NavCoin network decides everything, there is no central authority which makes the community fund 100% decentralized.
The community fund is quite new but there have already been some proposals that were accepted like paying for the development & hosting of NAV block explorer, the creation and distribution of NAV car stickers to the community for free (or paid by the community fund), the funding of interns for NavCoin Core, translation of the website into other languages and YouTube videos. What ideas could you come up with? By the way: this article was also sponsored by the community fund :-)

Proof of Stake
Like said before, NavCoin uses the Proof of Stake algorithm to create and validate blocks. Participants of the NavCoin network can earn rewards by putting their coins to stake and thus validating blocks and securing the network. The reward used to be 4% fixed but recently changed with the implementation of PoSv3. Currently, rewards for stakers that are staking 24/7 is about 10% but it is dependent on how many people are staking. If more nodes come online, this reward will go down. If 90% of all NAVs would be at stake, stakers would still earn 4%.

Tutorials And Guidelines [3]
The NavCoin Core team pushes the community to contribute to the NavCoin ecosystem constantly. They emphasize that NavCoin is an open source project and everyone can contribute. The team tries to make it as easy as possible for the average person to contribute and thus created different tutorials and guidelines.

Tutorials To Contribute To The Website
The whole website is open source. Everyone can contribute to the website. The team created different guides for people to follow [4].

The NavCoin Developer Manifesto
The content creator core team has build a developer manifesto. It defines the values that should be uphold like for example that they will always operate in the best interest of the network. If defines the principles, purposes, scope of involvement and operational requirements [5].

The NavCoin Content Creation Manifesto
Similar to the developer manifesto, there is also a content creation manifesto. Again it defines the principles for creating content, the purpose, the scope of involvement and the operational requirements [6].

NavCoin Brand Guidelines
In addition to the content creation manifesto, there is also a brand guideline booklet. This should help content creators to create images, videos, articles etc. in the same style as the core team. It defines the NAV brand. The brand guidelines contain definitions, the language to use (words to use, words not to use), the tone of voice, what the community aspires to be and what we discourage to be. It also contains the logo pack which can be used in graphics etc. It describes correct logo spacing, logo placement, the colors of NAV and different web assets. It gives tips about gradients and overlays, the typefaces (with a font pack) and many more. Check it out yourself [7].

NavCoin Educational Series
The core team has decided to actively involve the community in the creation of new features. For this reason and to allow users to ask questions, they created the NavCoin Educational Series. The core team schedules an online live meetup which can be joined by everyone. On YouTube they do live-streams and explain upcoming features. Examples of these series are explanations for cold staking, static rewards (PoSv3) and the community fund. The community can ask questions live and the core team will answer them immediately.

Community
During the last year there have been an influx of software developers from the community starting to create features for NAV.

navexplorer.com
An examples is navexplorer.com which is programmed by community developer prodpeak and is a block explorer for NavCoin. Additionally, it functions as a interface to see what is going on in the community fund. It shows pending proposals and payment requests.

NEXT Wallet
The NEXT Wallet is an alternative wallet for NAV and other cryptocurrencies. It has a beautiful user interface and is additionally the easiest interface to interact with the community fund (create proposals, create payment requests and vote for proposals and payment requests). It is programmed by community developer sakdeniz who put hundreds of hours into it during last year.

There were also some marketing activities starting to emerge with the release of the community fund. Some of these were for example free stickers for everyone in the NAV community to stick to their car / shop / window etc. or YouTube videos of CryptoCandor and Cryptomoonie that explained the details of NAV. I am sure, that with the 500'000 NAV available in the community fund per year there will be an influx of gread ideas - development as well as marketing activities - that will be funded.

The Future

Introduction
These features are planned for the future. Many of the following features are part of the 2019 roadmap. Some will not be described in great detail because not much is known about them yet. I've still listed them as they are part of what is yet to come.

Features
Rimu - Improved Privacy Solution
NavCoin used to be a optional privacy coin. That means, that you could choose to send a transaction in private. NavCoin was criticized for the way it handles private payments because it relied on a few servers which didn't make it that decentralized. The technology was called "NavTech" and was a secondary blockchain that obscured the transaction and the amount that was sent. NavCoin Core is currently developing a new improved privacy solution that will make the private payment system completely trustless and districuted and runs at a protocol level. Alex of the NavCoin Core team has published a paper that describes this new privacy solution. It's called Zero Confidential Transactions and can be found here: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/330366788_ZeroCT_Improving_Zerocoin_with_Confidential_Transactions_and_more. What I want to highlight is the collaboration between Alex as the proposer of the solution and the Veil team, a Bitcoin Core developer and Moneros main cryptographer as reviewers. When the best work together, it will be interesting to see what the outcome is!

Valence Plattform [8]
Valence is an applied Blockchain platform that can help businesses realise the tangible benefits of blockchain. You can think of Valence as a platform with which you can build Anonymous Distributed Applications (aDapps) with. But Valence is a different kind of platform that enables developers to create new types of blockchain applications. The problem with current (turing complete) dApp platforms are their complexity and rigid nature. Security holes in smart contracts and scaling issues happen frequently [9].
Valence provides transitional pathways that let businesses migrate only part of their activities to the blockchain without having to restructure their entire business model [9].
Valence will provide a spectrum of blockchain application solutions which sit along the decentralized spectrum, offering businesses simple ways to dip their toes into the blockchain at minimal risk or complexity [9].
Thanks to the proof of stake nature of the Valence blockchain, more of a node's resources can be used for processing and routing application data which makes the platform faster and scalable.
Valence aims to make building blockchain applications as accessible to the general public as WordPress or Squarespace has made building websites.
The developers NavCoin and Valence aim to make Valence extremely easy to work with:
A Valence application could be an open source mobile or web application that submits unencrypted or encrypted data directly to the blockchain. The only configuration necessary for the app developer would be setting up the data structure. Once they've done that they can start writing to the blockchain immediately.
The Valence blockchain interface is language agnostic, meaning developers are free to build applications in whichever language they're familiar with, which greatly reduces the barrier to entry.
As the platform progresses, Valence will introduce more and more smart contract templates in collaboration with the development community. These will be like plugins that users can simply select and configure for their application, without having to reinvent the wheel and risk contract errors or spend countless hours of research to program them.

NavShopper
The following information is taken from the latest weekly news: NavShopper is a new project which will allow people to spend NavCoin on a growing list of retailers and service providers. NavShopper sits between traditional retailers accepting fiat and NavCoin users and purchases products on behalf of the user by managing the crypt-fiat conversion, payment and shipping. This project will unlock many more ways for people to spend NAV on existing websites/marketplaces without requiring each site to individually accept cryptocurrencies. Some of the prototypes we are working on include crediting your Uber account, buying products on Amazon and donating to charities.

Kauri Wallet
The Kauri Wallet aims to be an open-source, multi-currency wallet which functions as a foundation for other features.

Kauri Enhanced
Enhancements to the Kauri Wallet will allow multiple accounts, pin numbers, recurring payments and more.

Kauri DAEx
The Kauri DAEx is a Decentralised Atomic Exchange that utilises the features of the Kauri Wallet and enables users to create safe peer to peer atomic exchanges for any currency supported by the Kauri Wallet. NavDelta NavDelta will be a payment gateway that allows users to spend NAV at any business which accepts currencies supported by the Kauri Wallet. NavMorph NavMorph is a fusion of Rimu and Kauri DAEx and will allow to privately send every cryptocurrency supported by the Kauri Wallet.

Outro

If you have made it this far: Congratulations! You have learned about how NAV evolved, what its current state is and what the future will bring. To sum all up: NavCoin has made incredible progress during last year and released many long awaited features despite the bear market. Many more exciting features are yet to come and it's going to be very interesting to see where we will stand on this day next year.

Giveaway

Unfortunately, the giveaway was not possible in the cryptocurrency-subreddit because of their rules, so I'm doing it here :-) As a surprise, in the next 2 hours I am going to send some NAV to everyone who wants to try out the awesome features and NavPay you read about above.
To get your NAVs, all you have to do is the following:
If you liked the experience, I'd be happy to hear back from you :)

References

[1] https://encrypt-s.com/company/
[2] https://navcoin.org/en/roadmap/
[3] https://navhub.org/get-involved/
[4] https://navhub.org/how-to-guide/
[5] https://navhub.org/assets/NavCoinDeveloperManifesto.pdf
[6] https://navhub.org/assets/NavCoinContentManifesto.pdf
[7] https://navhub.org/assets/NavCoinBrandGuidelines.pdf
[8] https://valenceplatform.org/
[9] https://valenceplatform.org/learn/business-on-the-blockchain-made-easy/
[10] https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=679791.msg8320228#msg8320228
submitted by crypto_sIF to NavCoin [link] [comments]

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