Bitcoin 101 For Morons - Being Libertarian

ETHE & GBTC (Grayscale) Frequently Asked Questions

It is no doubt Grayscale’s booming popularity as a mainstream investment has caused a lot of community hullabaloo lately. As such, I felt it was worth making a FAQ regarding the topic. I’m looking to update this as needed and of course am open to suggestions / adding any questions.
The goal is simply to have a thread we can link to anyone with questions on Grayscale and its products. Instead of explaining the same thing 3 times a day, shoot those posters over to this thread. My hope is that these questions are answered in a fairly simple and easy to understand manner. I think as the sub grows it will be a nice reference point for newcomers.
Disclaimer: I do NOT work for Grayscale and as such am basing all these answers on information that can be found on their website / reports. (Grayscale’s official FAQ can be found here). I also do NOT have a finance degree, I do NOT have a Series 6 / 7 / 140-whatever, and I do NOT work with investment products for my day job. I have an accounting background and work within the finance world so I have the general ‘business’ knowledge to put it all together, but this is all info determined in my best faith effort as a layman. The point being is this --- it is possible I may explain something wrong or missed the technical terms, and if that occurs I am more than happy to update anything that can be proven incorrect
Everything below will be in reference to ETHE but will apply to GBTC as well. If those two segregate in any way, I will note that accordingly.
What is Grayscale? 
Grayscale is the company that created the ETHE product. Their website is https://grayscale.co/
What is ETHE? 
ETHE is essentially a stock that intends to loosely track the price of ETH. It does so by having each ETHE be backed by a specific amount of ETH that is held on chain. Initially, the newly minted ETHE can only be purchased by institutions and accredited investors directly from Grayscale. Once a year has passed (6 months for GBTC) it can then be listed on the OTCQX Best Market exchange for secondary trading. Once listed on OTCQX, anyone investor can purchase at this point. Additional information on ETHE can be found here.
So ETHE is an ETF? 
No. For technical reasons beyond my personal understandings it is not labeled an ETF. I know it all flows back to the “Securities Act Rule 144”, but due to my limited knowledge on SEC regulations I don’t want to misspeak past that. If anyone is more knowledgeable on the subject I am happy to input their answer here.
How long has ETHE existed? 
ETHE was formed 12/14/2017. GBTC was formed 9/25/2013.
How is ETHE created? 
The trust will issue shares to “Authorized Participants” in groups of 100 shares (called baskets). Authorized Participants are the only persons that may place orders to create these baskets and they do it on behalf of the investor.
Source: Creation and Redemption of Shares section on page 39 of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
Note – The way their reports word this makes it sound like there is an army of authorizers doing the dirty work, but in reality there is only one Authorized Participant. At this moment the “Genesis” company is the sole Authorized Participant. Genesis is owned by the “Digital Currency Group, Inc.” which is the parent company of Grayscale as well. (And to really go down the rabbit hole it looks like DCG is the parent company of CoinDesk and is “backing 150+ companies across 30 countries, including Coinbase, Ripple, and Chainalysis.”)
Source: Digital Currency Group, Inc. informational section on page 77 of the “Grayscale Bitcoin Trust (BTC) Form 10-K (2019)” – Located Here
Source: Barry E. Silbert informational section on page 75 of the “Grayscale Bitcoin Trust (BTC) Form 10-K (2019)” – Located Here
How does Grayscale acquire the ETH to collateralize the ETHE product? 
An Investor may acquire ETHE by paying in cash or exchanging ETH already owned.
Source: Creation and Redemption of Shares section on page 40 of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
Where does Grayscale store their ETH? Does it have a specific wallet address we can follow? 
ETH is stored with Coinbase Custody Trust Company, LLC. I am unaware of any specific address or set of addresses that can be used to verify the ETH is actually there.
As an aside - I would actually love to see if anyone knows more about this as it’s something that’s sort of peaked my interest after being asked about it… I find it doubtful we can find that however.
Source: Part C. Business Information, Item 8, subsection A. on page 16 of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
Can ETHE be redeemed for ETH? 
No, currently there is no way to give your shares of ETHE back to Grayscale to receive ETH back. The only method of getting back into ETH would be to sell your ETHE to someone else and then use those proceeds to buy ETH yourself.
Source: Redemption Procedures on page 41 of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
Why are they not redeeming shares? 
I think the report summarizes it best:
Redemptions of Shares are currently not permitted and the Trust is unable to redeem Shares. Subject to receipt of regulatory approval from the SEC and approval by the Sponsor in its sole discretion, the Trust may in the future operate a redemption program. Because the Trust does not believe that the SEC would, at this time, entertain an application for the waiver of rules needed in order to operate an ongoing redemption program, the Trust currently has no intention of seeking regulatory approval from the SEC to operate an ongoing redemption program.
Source: Redemption Procedures on page 41 of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
What is the fee structure? 
ETHE has an annual fee of 2.5%. GBTC has an annual fee of 2.0%. Fees are paid by selling the underlying ETH / BTC collateralizing the asset.
Source: ETHE’s informational page on Grayscale’s website - Located Here
Source: Description of Trust on page 31 & 32 of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
What is the ratio of ETH to ETHE? 
At the time of posting (6/19/2020) each ETHE share is backed by .09391605 ETH. Each share of GBTC is backed by .00096038 BTC.
ETHE & GBTC’s specific information page on Grayscale’s website updates the ratio daily – Located Here
For a full historical look at this ratio, it can be found on the Grayscale home page on the upper right side if you go to Tax Documents > 2019 Tax Documents > Grayscale Ethereum Trust 2019 Tax Letter.
Why is the ratio not 1:1? Why is it always decreasing? 
While I cannot say for certain why the initial distribution was not a 1:1 backing, it is more than likely to keep the price down and allow more investors a chance to purchase ETHE / GBTC.
As noted above, fees are paid by selling off the ETH collateralizing ETHE. So this number will always be trending downward as time goes on.
Source: Description of Trust on page 32 of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
I keep hearing about how this is locked supply… explain? 
As noted above, there is currently no redemption program for converting your ETHE back into ETH. This means that once an ETHE is issued, it will remain in circulation until a redemption program is formed --- something that doesn’t seem to be too urgent for the SEC or Grayscale at the moment. Tiny amounts will naturally be removed due to fees, but the bulk of the asset is in there for good.
Knowing that ETHE cannot be taken back and destroyed at this time, the ETH collateralizing it will not be removed from the wallet for the foreseeable future. While it is not fully locked in the sense of say a totally lost key, it is not coming out any time soon.
Per their annual statement:
The Trust’s ETH will be transferred out of the ETH Account only in the following circumstances: (i) transferred to pay the Sponsor’s Fee or any Additional Trust Expenses, (ii) distributed in connection with the redemption of Baskets (subject to the Trust’s obtaining regulatory approval from the SEC to operate an ongoing redemption program and the consent of the Sponsor), (iii) sold on an as-needed basis to pay Additional Trust Expenses or (iv) sold on behalf of the Trust in the event the Trust terminates and liquidates its assets or as otherwise required by law or regulation.
Source: Description of Trust on page 31 of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
Grayscale now owns a huge chunk of both ETH and BTC’s supply… should we be worried about manipulation, a sell off to crash the market crash, a staking cartel? 
First, it’s important to remember Grayscale is a lot more akin to an exchange then say an investment firm. Grayscale is working on behalf of its investors to create this product for investor control. Grayscale doesn’t ‘control’ the ETH it holds any more then Coinbase ‘controls’ the ETH in its hot wallet. (Note: There are likely some varying levels of control, but specific to this topic Grayscale cannot simply sell [legally, at least] the ETH by their own decision in the same manner Coinbase wouldn't be able to either.)
That said, there shouldn’t be any worry in the short to medium time-frame. As noted above, Grayscale can’t really remove ETH other than for fees or termination of the product. At 2.5% a year, fees are noise in terms of volume. Grayscale seems to be the fastest growing product in the crypto space at the moment and termination of the product seems unlikely.
IF redemptions were to happen tomorrow, it’s extremely unlikely we would see a mass exodus out of the product to redeem for ETH. And even if there was incentive to get back to ETH, the premium makes it so that it would be much more cost effective to just sell your ETHE on the secondary market and buy ETH yourself. Remember, any redemption is up to the investors and NOT something Grayscale has direct control over.
Yes, but what about [insert criminal act here]… 
Alright, yes. Technically nothing is stopping Grayscale from selling all the ETH / BTC and running off to the Bahamas (Hawaii?). BUT there is no real reason for them to do so. Barry is an extremely public figure and it won’t be easy for him to get away with that. Grayscale’s Bitcoin Trust creates SEC reports weekly / bi-weekly and I’m sure given the sentiment towards crypto is being watched carefully. Plus, Grayscale is making tons of consistent revenue and thus has little to no incentive to give that up for a quick buck.
That’s a lot of ‘happy little feels’ Bob, is there even an independent audit or is this Tether 2.0? 
Actually yes, an independent auditor report can be found in their annual reports. It is clearly aimed more towards the financial side and I doubt the auditors are crypto savants, but it is at least one extra set of eyes. Auditors are Friedman LLP – Auditor since 2015.
Source: Independent Auditor Report starting on page 116 (of the PDF itself) of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
As mentioned by user TheCrpytosAndBloods (In Comments Below), a fun fact:
The company’s auditors Friedman LLP were also coincidentally TetheBitfinex’s auditors until They controversially parted ways in 2018 when the Tether controversy was at its height. I am not suggesting for one moment that there is anything shady about DCG - I just find it interesting it’s the same auditor.
“Grayscale sounds kind of lame” / “Not your keys not your crypto!” / “Why is anyone buying this, it sounds like a scam?” 
Welp, for starters this honestly is not really a product aimed at the people likely to be reading this post. To each their own, but do remember just because something provides no value to you doesn’t mean it can’t provide value to someone else. That said some of the advertised benefits are as follows:
So for example, I can set up an IRA at a brokerage account that has $0 trading fees. Then I can trade GBTC and ETHE all day without having to worry about tracking my taxes. All with the relative safety something like E-Trade provides over Binance.
As for how it benefits the everyday ETH holder? I think the supply lock is a positive. I also think this product exposes the Ethereum ecosystem to people who otherwise wouldn’t know about it.
Why is there a premium? Why is ETHE’s premium so insanely high compared to GBTC’s premium? 
There are a handful of theories of why a premium exists at all, some even mentioned in the annual report. The short list is as follows:
Why is ETHE’s so much higher the GBTC’s? Again, a few thoughts:

Are there any other differences between ETHE and GBTC? 
I touched on a few of the smaller differences, but one of the more interesting changes is GBTC is now a “SEC reporting company” as of January 2020. Which again goes beyond my scope of knowledge so I won’t comment on it too much… but the net result is GBTC is now putting out weekly / bi-weekly 8-K’s and annual 10-K’s. This means you can track GBTC that much easier at the moment as well as there is an extra layer of validity to the product IMO.
I’m looking for some statistics on ETHE… such as who is buying, how much is bought, etc? 
There is a great Q1 2020 report I recommend you give a read that has a lot of cool graphs and data on the product. It’s a little GBTC centric, but there is some ETHE data as well. It can be found here hidden within the 8-K filings.Q1 2020 is the 4/16/2020 8-K filing.
For those more into a GAAP style report see the 2019 annual 10-K of the same location.
Is Grayscale only just for BTC and ETH? 
No, there are other products as well. In terms of a secondary market product, ETCG is the Ethereum Classic version of ETHE. Fun Fact – ETCG was actually put out to the secondary market first. It also has a 3% fee tied to it where 1% of it goes to some type of ETC development fund.
In terms of institutional and accredited investors, there are a few ‘fan favorites’ such as Bitcoin Cash, Litcoin, Stellar, XRP, and Zcash. Something called Horizion (Backed by ZEN I guess? Idk to be honest what that is…). And a diversified Mutual Fund type fund that has a little bit of all of those. None of these products are available on the secondary market.
Are there alternatives to Grayscale? 
I know they exist, but I don’t follow them. I’ll leave this as a “to be edited” section and will add as others comment on what they know.
Per user Over-analyser (in comments below):
Coinshares (Formerly XBT provider) are the only similar product I know of. BTC, ETH, XRP and LTC as Exchange Traded Notes (ETN).
It looks like they are fully backed with the underlying crypto (no premium).
https://coinshares.com/etps/xbt-provideinvestor-resources/daily-hedging-position
Denominated in SEK and EUR. Certainly available in some UK pensions (SIPP).
As asked by pegcity - Okay so I was under the impression you can just give them your own ETH and get ETHE, but do you get 11 ETHE per ETH or do you get the market value of ETH in USD worth of ETHE? 
I have always understood that the ETHE issued directly through Grayscale is issued without the premium. As in, if I were to trade 1 ETH for ETHE I would get 11, not say only 2 or 3 because the secondary market premium is so high. And if I were paying cash only I would be paying the price to buy 1 ETH to get my 11 ETHE. Per page 39 of their annual statement, it reads as follows:
The Trust will issue Shares to Authorized Participants from time to time, but only in one or more Baskets (with a Basket being a block of 100 Shares). The Trust will not issue fractions of a Basket. The creation (and, should the Trust commence a redemption program, redemption) of Baskets will be made only in exchange for the delivery to the Trust, or the distribution by the Trust, of the number of whole and fractional ETH represented by each Basket being created (or, should the Trust commence a redemption program, redeemed), which is determined by dividing (x) the number of ETH owned by the Trust at 4:00 p.m., New York time, on the trade date of a creation or redemption order, after deducting the number of ETH representing the U.S. dollar value of accrued but unpaid fees and expenses of the Trust (converted using the ETH Index Price at such time, and carried to the eighth decimal place), by (y) the number of Shares outstanding at such time (with the quotient so obtained calculated to one one-hundred-millionth of one ETH (i.e., carried to the eighth decimal place)), and multiplying such quotient by 100 (the “Basket ETH Amount”). All questions as to the calculation of the Basket ETH Amount will be conclusively determined by the Sponsor and will be final and binding on all persons interested in the Trust. The Basket ETH Amount multiplied by the number of Baskets being created or redeemed is the “Total Basket ETH Amount.” The number of ETH represented by a Share will gradually decrease over time as the Trust’s ETH are used to pay the Trust’s expenses. Each Share represented approximately 0.0950 ETH and 0.0974 ETH as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively.

submitted by Bob-Rossi to ethfinance [link] [comments]

An In-Depth Guide to: How do I Fix my Ledger Nano’s Stuck Ethereum Transaction?!?!?! (It’s Been Stuck for Weeks and NOTHING Traditional has Worked!!!!) As Well as: How Do I Choose My Nonce??? I’ve Tried MetaMask, MEW/MyEtherWallet, and Others, but Nothing is Working Correctly!!! I’m Dying by Stress!

So, if you were like me 1-2 months ago, you’ve probably already gone through 2,or 3, ...or 40 articles and guides that probably say something like:
“YeP, eVeRy EtHeReUm UsEr WiLl EvEnTuAlLy HaVe ThE LoW-gAs ExPeRiEnCe, YoU’rE nOt AlOnE! DoN’t FrEaK OuT tHoUgH; ThErE iS a WaY tO fIx It!”
Chances are, every time you read another useless article, you want to kill the nearest inanimate object, even though it was never alive in the first place. Nonetheless, you’re gonna kill it as much as it can be killed, holding nothing back; or, you’re just plotting to and slowly getting closer to executing the plan (and the object) every time you are insulted once again.
However, if you have the ability to download software (MyCryptoWallet) on a PC, it should be safe to relax now. I think you’ve finally found some good news, because I am 99.99...% sure this will work for the issue that so many people are having at this time, around the end of the month of May, year 2020.
More and more people are likely to be having this issue soon, since Ethereum's gas prices have been insanely high lately as well as having 300% price changes in a matter of minutes; Etherscan’s Gas tracker is nearly uselessly-inaccurate at this time. I've heard that there's a congestion attack; that was said a week ago, and it appears to be ongoing... (I can't think of any other suspect besides Justin Sun to blame it on... it must be incredibly expensive to overload the blockchain for this long... I may be wrong though...)
 
Let’s begin
For myself, I was trying to send an ERC20 token when this dreadful issue attacked. Specifically, the token was either BSOV or GRT; I sent them 1 after the other and the first succeeded, and the second one took over a week.
(They’re both great tokens in my opinion and deserve much more attention than they’ve been getting. BSOV is nearing its 1 year anniversary as I write this, and GRT is still in its 90 day community-development progress test, so of course I'm gonna take this opportunity to "shill" them; they are great tokens with great communities).
I was able to finally fix it, after a week of mental agony (also the txn finally processed 1-2 hours before I found the solution, robbing me of the gratitude of fixing it myself... (╯‵□′)╯︵┻━┻ ...but now I guess I can hopefully save some of you the headaches that I endured... ) I’m providing the ability to do the same, in a step by step guide.
Why did I go through all of this trouble? I'd fault the fact that I have ADHD and autism, which in my case can multiply each other’s intensity and cause me to “hyper-focus” on things, much much more than most with the same qualities, intentionally or not. Adderall is supposed to give me a bit of control over it, but except for in a very-generalized way, it’s still 90% up to chance and my default-capabilities to allow me control over my attention with self-willpower. But also Karma and Moons pls... ʘ‿ʘ
 
  1. In MyCrypto, (I'm using the Windows 10 app, version 1.7.10) you will open to a screen that says "How would you like to access your wallet?". Choose Ledger, of course. (Unless your here for some non-ledger issue? Idk why you would be but ok.)
  2. On the next screen (having your nano already plugged in, unlocked, and opened into the Ethereum app) click "Connect to Ledger Wallet"
  3. A screen overlay should appear, titled: "Select an Address". Here is where it may get confusing for some users. Refer to "AAA" below to know how to find your account. (Geez, sorry lol that was a huge amount of info for a reddit reply; I might've over-elaborated a little bit too much. but hey it's valuable information nonetheless!)
  4. After escaping the "AAA" section, you'll have accessed your account with MyCrypto. Awesome! To find your ERC20 tokens, (slight evil-laughter is heard from an unidentifiable origin somewhere in the back of your mind) go to "AAB".
  5. (You may have decided to find the token(s) on your own, rather than daring to submit to my help again; if so, you may pity those who chose the other path... ~~( ̄▽ ̄)~~) Now, once you've added your token, you should revert your attention to the account's transfer fill-out form!
  6. I'll combine the steps you probably understood on your own, already. Put in the address that your stuck transaction is still trying to send currency to. If an ERC20 token is involved, use the drop-down menu to change "ETH" to the token in trouble. Input your amount into the box labeled... wait for it... "Amount". Click on "+Advanced".
  7. Refer to Etherscan.com for the data you will need. Find the page for your "transaction(txn) hash/address" from the transaction history on the wallet/Ethereum-manager you used to send from. If that is unavailable, put your public address that your txn was sent from into the search tool and go to its info page; you should be able to find the pending txn there. Look to open the "more details" option to find the transaction's "Nonce" number.
  8. Put the nonce in the "Nonce" box on MyCrypto; you will contest the pending txn with a new txn that offers larger gas fees, by using the same nonce. If (but most likely "When") the new transaction is processed first, for being more miner-beneficial, the nonce will then be completed, and the old transaction will be dropped because it requests an invalid, now-outdated nonce. Your account will soon be usable!
  9. Go to the Gas Tracker, and it may or may not provide an informative reading. Choose whatever amount you think is best, but choose wisely; if you're too stingy it may get stuck again, and you'd need to pay another txn's gas to attempt another txn-fix.
  10. At the time I write this, I'd recommend 50-100 gwei; to repeat myself, gas requirements are insane right now. To be safe, make the gas limit a little higher than MCW's automatic calculation, you may need to undo the check-mark for "Automatically Calculate Gas Limit".
  11. Press "Send Transaction"!!!
  12. You will need to validate the action through your nano. It will have you validate three different things if you are moving an ERC20 Token. It's a good idea to verify accuracy, as always.
 
Well, I hope this worked for you! If not, you can let me know in a reply and I'll try to figure it out with you. I like making these in-depth educational posts, so if you appreciate it please let me know; I'll probably make more posts like this in the future!
( Surely this is at least far better than Ledger's "Support" article where they basically just tell you "Yeah, we haven't bothered to make a way to manually select nonces. I guess we might try to make that available for Bitcoin accounts at some point in the future; who knows? lol"... that's not infuriating at all, right?)
 
AAA:
Before I tell you how to find your address, I will first make it clear, within the italicized text, exactly which address you are looking for, if you are not already sure:
You may also skip the text written in italics if your issue does not include an ERC20 token, if you wish.
Ledger Live can confuse some users with its interface. On LL, to manage an ERC20 token, you first must go to your Ethereum account and add the token. When you then click on the added token under "Tokens" below the graph chart for your account's ETH amount over time, the screen will then open a new screen, that looks just the same, except focused on the specific ERC20 token. To confuse users further, there is then an option to "Star account", which then add the ETH icon with the ERC20 token's first letter or symbol overlapping, onto the easy access sidebar, as if it was another account of similar independency to the ETH account it was added to.
This improperly displays the two "accounts" relation to each other.
Your ERC20 holdings (at least for any and all ERC20 that I know of) are "held" in the exact-same address as the Ethereum address it was added to, which also "holds" any Ether you've added to it. You send both Ether (ETH) and any ERC20 Tokens to and from only Ethereum addresses of equivalent capabilities, in both qualities and quantities. In all basic terms and uses, they are the same.
So, to know what the problematic account's address is, find the address of the Ethereum account it was added to in Ledger Live.
Now, to find your address on MyCrypto, the most reliable way to find it, that I am aware of, is this:
Open Ledger Live. Go to the screen of your Ethereum address (again, this is the one that you added your ERC20 token, if applicable. If you're not dealing with an ERC20 token, you may ignore everything I've put in Italics). Click on "Edit account"; this is the icon next to the star that may look like a hex-wrench tool. On the new screen-overlay, you will see "> ADVANCED LOGS". Click on the ">" and it will point down while revealing a drop-down with some data that you may or may not recognize/understand. Likely to be found indented and in the middle-ish area, you will see this line, or something hopefully similar:
"freshAddressPath": "44'/60'/X'/0/0",
The "X" will probably be the only thing that changes, and the actual data will have a number in its place; it will not be a letter. Let's now put that line to use in MyCrypto:
Take the 44'/60'/X'/0/0 , and make sure you DO NOT copy the quotation marks, or that comma at the end either.
You can do this before or after copying and/or pasting, but drop the second "/0" at the end; it was not necessary in my case, I expect that you won't need it either, and will probably just make MyCrypto see it as an invalid input.
Okay, now go back to the "Select an Address" screen-overlay in MyCrypto.
Next to "Addresses", click on the box on the right, and you should be shown a list of options to select from in a drop-down menu.
Scroll all the way down, and you should find the "Custom" option at the very bottom. Select it.
A new box will appear; probably directly to the right of the now-shortened box that now displays the "Custom" option that you just selected. This box will offer an interface for typed input. ...yep... once again, believe it or not, you should click it.
Type " m/ ", no spaces before or after.
Type in or paste the data we retrieved from ledger live.
The box should now hold this:
m/44'/60'/X'/0
Again, X should be a number. In fact, that number is probably equal to the number of Ethereum (not including any ERC20 wannabe) accounts that you've made on Ledger Live before making the one we're working on right now! (1st Eth. Acc. would have: X = 0, 2nd: X = 1, 3rd: X = 2, ...)
Make sure you've included every apostrophe ( ' ), and solidus ( / ); there is NO APOSTROPHE for the "m" at the start and the "/0" at the end!
If you press the enter key or click on the check-mark to the right of where you typed, the appropriate addresses will be generated, and the address you created through Ledger Live should be the first one on the list!
Select your address and press "Unlock", and you are now accessing your account through the MyCrypto app's interface!
 
AAB:
In order to access your ERC20 token, you will need to add them first.
You may have to scroll down, but on the right-side of your unlocked account screen, you'll see a box with "Token Balances" as its header.
Click "Scan for tokens". This may take a short bit of time, and when it's done it may or may not display your ERC20 token. If it worked, you can head on back to the main part.
If you got the result I did, it won't display your token, or, if our result was exactly the same, it won't display any at all. However, you should now have the "Add Custom Token" option available, so see where that takes you.
You should discover four boxes, specified in order (Address/ Decimals / Token_Symbol / Balance). You may only need to fill in the "Address" box, but if you need to fill others, you'll find those with the token's address; here's 2 ways to find it, if you don't already know.
Method I:
Since you've probably already been managing your token with Ledger Live, you can go to the LL screen of your "account" for that token; Right next to the account's icon, and directly above the name, you'll see:
Contract: 0x??????...????????
Yes, go on; click it. You'll find the token's page on Etherscan; this was just a shortcut to the same place that both of the two previously referenced methods lead to. Skip to method... III?
Method II:
Go to Etherscan.com, or a similar Ethereum-blockchain-monitoring website, if you have a different preference. Search for the name of your token, and you should be able to see it as a search result. Activate your search manually of by selecting search option. Continue on with Method III.
Method III (Iⅈ what makes you think there was a third method? I said 2!):
At this point, you should find the "contract address" somewhere on the screen. This is the identity of the creature that breathes life into the token, allowing it to exist within the world of Ethereum. Steal it, and tell MyCrypto that you've left some of "your" tokens in the address of your ledger's Ethereum account. MyCrypto will trust and believe you without any concern or doubt, just by putting "your" contract address in the box for "Address"; it's almost too easy!
Well whaddya know, this one isn't actually too long! Don't tell anyone who may have taken a little longer whilst finding out how to do it themselves, though. There's value in trying to do something on your own, at least at first, so I'll let them think they made the right choice (¬‿¬). But take this star for humbling yourself enough to seek further help when you need it, since that is a very important life skill as well!
(o゜▽゜)o☆
Now, back to the useful stuff at the top...
 
EDIT: A comment below made me realize that this info should be added too. Here is my reply to the comment saying I could just use MetaMask. I said in the title that this guide is for questions where MEW and MetaMask aren’t working, but I guess it’s easy to miss. I used my u/caddark account to respond:
(Using this account because u/caddarkcrypto doesn’t meet the karma/age standards to comment; the post had to be manually approved.)
I guess I didn’t make it entirely clear; sorry:
The target audience for this guide is anyone with a stuck Ethereum transaction that was initiated through Ledger Live AND are experiencing the same difficulties I had encountered while trying to fix this issue for myself.
This wasn’t any regular stuck Ethereum transaction. Apparently before, there was an issue that made a Ledger Nano nearly impossible to connect to MetaMask (which is also Brave Browser’s integrated “crypto wallet” for the desktop version) and/or MEW (also perhaps any other browser wallets made for chrome and/or brave) that I heard was supposed to be fixed in a recent update. It might’ve been mostly patched, idk, but during my experience, (in which I was using the latest version of Ledger Live that is available right now,) that issue still remained.
The really weird part was that it successfully connected to the browser wallets again after I fixed the stuck transaction. At first I thought that somehow the txn was what was bugging the connection. However, later, during no txn issues, I was again unable to connect.
Seeing the same connection error again later, I opened up the MCW app I downloaded the day before, and was going to just use that. While in the process of operating MCW, I suddenly had another idea to try for the browser wallet so I went back to that just to quickly test it.
The browser wallet worked perfectly...
I don’t know how, but I think that somehow, something in MCW’s software, makes the browser wallets work. They don’t work for me without having MCW opened in the background first.
EDIT 2: Markdown decided to stop working after I did the first edit... I might fix it tomorrow... how did that happen though??? What did I do?
EDIT 3: nvm, I'm just fixing it now; I won't get much sleep tonight I guess.
submitted by CaddarkCrypto to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Kin: The Reader's Digest Condensed Version

We all know that Kin is a unique digital currency, that it has value and utility, and that the Kin Ecosystem, currently in development, is going to be big--very big. But let’s look back for a moment. In order to see the scope of what’s happening, and where we’re going, it might be useful to look back, at where we’ve been.
Kin was started by the good folks at KIK Messenger. As Facebook and Google grew to gargantuan proportions, it became obvious to all that the old-school model of Advertisement Placement for monetization was becoming untenable for anyone other than the biggest and most entrenched of companies. Yes, the Facebooks and Googles of the world were doing fine with monetization via advertisements, and were busily scalping data from their users in a feeding frenzy to capitalize on the one asset they could sell… those users’ attention.
While most users thought Facebook was designed to give the social media platform as the product, and that they themselves were the customers, the reality is far different. The truth is that the advertisers were the actual customers, and Facebook users were the actual product. Very much like the Matrix, isn’t it? We are fed a social media mental “pudding,” and in return we give Facebook hours and hours of our attention… which it then sells to the advertisers.
Understandably, this realization came as a shock to those who were able to see and understand this revelation. Many users still do not grasp the reality of the situation, and are happily, mindlessly eating the pudding.
Leaving aside the distasteful mental image this business model give us, it created a problem for up-and-coming, and smaller but established Social Media companies. The smaller SM operations were left in a bit of a financial quandary… advertisers were loathe to spend on smaller platforms, because the reach of the giant platforms was so large and all inclusive. The remainder were basically crumbs on the floor.
From this basic problem… and the ensuing economic reality… came the idea for Kin.
Monetization is a concept that no one really enjoys talking about. For most of us, we’ve come to accept that ads are a necessary evil that we pay attention to in order to receive content; at this point most of us simply grit our teeth and press on. No, I’m never ever going to buy that silly spray to cover up the smell of your poo, but go ahead, play the damned video ad… again. I digress.
But what if there was a way to change the dynamic so that the SM platform user’s attention was no longer the product that got sold to monetize the operation? What if the user could sell his or her OWN attention, and be rewarded thusly? And what if there was a way to compensate developers and businesses who work in the ecosystem for this activity as well?
What if the user actually became a rewarded participant in the engine that generated income? And was even able to generate income for themselves in the process? What if a system was designed to reward users, developers and investors, all at the same time?
This is the basic premise of Kin.
THE GENESIS of KIN
In 2009, Kik Interactive was formed by a group of college students at the University of Waterloo, Canada, in order to create applications for mobile devices and smartphones. Soon thereafter, the Kik Messenger was launched. In it’s first fifteen days, Kik enrolled over one million users. Over the years, Kik has solidified itself as a strong niche player in the messaging app world. Initially, Kik monetized itself by placing advertisements, but realized over time that ad revenue might not be the best way to keep Kik in solvent.
After several years of struggle, Kik embarked on an experiment and instituted a program called “Kik Points.” This program allowed Kik users to participate in a very basic and limited “earn and spend” program. The users would answer surveys, or watch videos, in order to “earn” Kik Points… which they could then spend on in-app programs like sticker packs or emojis. What the Kik folks saw was a very enthusiastic, large group of people working to earn, and then spend Kik Points, in a transactional rate and density that dwarfs that of every cryptocurrency, including Bitcoin.
Kik then knew it was onto something. The team got to work, and after years of design, Kin was born. The Kin token was introduced into the crypto universe through an ICO (initial coin offering).
The Basics of Kin
Kin is the first cryptocurrency designed for mass-adoption and utility. It was engineered, specifically, to act as a currency to be used in millions of daily small and micro-transactions. In other words, it was a coin designed to be “spent” by the masses, not held by speculators.
Kin is designed to reward people for using the coin. The Kin Rewards Engine (KRE) pays Kin to users and developers who contribute to the ecosystem. This does “inflate” the circulating supply of the coin, which in turn keeps the value of the individual coins in check, but in reality this is a core design component of Kin. Kin is designed to grow in value, but is designed to grow more slowly because of the extreme volatility witnessed in the growth of other coins. This kind of volatility would destroy Kin’s ability to be used as a true currency. The KRE serves two purposes, then; to reward those who boost the ecosystem thought their efforts, and to moderate the extreme peaks and valleys that have plagued cryptocurrency since the invention of Bitcoin.
Bitcoin, for example, has morphed into a “store of wealth” rather than an actual usable currency. It is “deflationary” in nature; in other words, the scarcity of it is the sole driver of it’s value. The high cost of Bitcoin transactions, extreme value fluctuations and slow processing speed all hinder its use as a true currency. Additionally, why would someone spend Bitcoin when it may appreciate significantly in a short period of time? We all have heard the story about the two pizzas that were bought with 40,000 BTC… which would make those two pizzas worth over $300 million dollars today. And why would a merchant accept a currency that might lose a large percentage of it’s value very quickly? With a deflationary, speculative currency like Bitcoin, swings of plus or minus 30 to 50% within a few days are not uncommon.
Kin, on the other hand, is designed to be used and spent by millions of users. It’s value will also grow significantly, but that growth will be relatively stable, with few of the huge peaks and valleys we’ve all seen in other cryptocurrencies. This is directly due to the large initial supply of Kin tokens (756 billion) the large maximum supply (10 trillion) and the design of the KRE. Most people with any crypto experience see that 10 trillion figure (the maximum circulating supply of Kin) to be a huge detriment at first blush. This is because they haven’t grasped the need for that many tokens. Looking at it from the perspective of other crypto, 10T coins is a ludicrous, astronomical number of coins. And with any other coin, it would bake no sense.
But Kin is unique. It’s a true currency, not a store of wealth. It is designed to create value growth through usage, not through speculative buying, selling and holding. When Kin reaches mass adoption, the larger supply of coins will keep the price of the coin relatively stable while it grows in value, and will significantly reduce volatility.
Notice that I did not say that the large supply will reduce appreciation; it won’t. That’s because while Kin is designed to be an inexpensive coin, and should never experience the volatility of Bitcoin, that doesn’t mean it won’t gain and accumulate value. It most definitely will. There are no limits to that appreciation, and those who buy Kin now, while the price is well below 1/100ths of a cent, will see significant return on their investment. That opportunity, as significant as it is, is not going to last much longer, and will not be available again.
Kin is designed to go against the “normal” crypto path of pump and dump. It is not designed for arbitrage trading. Again, it is designed for utility, to be earned and spent, unlike most cryptocurrencies.
Kin is designed to be an inflationary coin, not a deflationary coin. In that, I mean that Kin, through the KRE, injects liquidity into the ecosystem and does not appreciate solely due to its scarcity. The KRE rewards those who have significant positive effect on the ecosystem by awarding Kin to those entities or people. If you develop an app that captures people’s imaginations and is wildly successful (think PokemonGo), and you’re using Kin to monetize that app, that effect on the Kin Ecosystem will be greatly rewarded with equivalent Kin. By injecting this liquidity into the ecosystem, the KRE rewards those who make the ecosystem work. This also tends to have an inflationary effect that slows the growth of the coin into a manageable upward trajectory, versus a hyperbolic, exponential increase.
Bitcoin, on the other hand, is deflationary… which means that no new BTC will be brought into the BTC system, and its value is based solely on that perceived scarcity. Since it has no mass adoption or real utility, and it’s value can rise and fall very quickly in large amounts. People buy Bitcoin for two reasons only today; speculation, and movement of fiat currencies into other cryptocurrencies. Speculation is the reason most people get into cryptocurrencies; with the advent of Kin, that will no longer be the case. Once Kin begins mass adoption, the majority of people in cryptocurrencies will be in Kin, and will be using, earning and spending Kin without buying the coin on an exchange. They will not be speculators, they will be users.
Speculation has been the name of the crypto game in the past, of course, but that is about to change. Speculation on crypto will become the minority use case, not the majority. Bitcoin will always have a place, obviously, but can you buy groceries with it? Can you pay your electric bill? Can you go out to eat using Bitcoin? No. Bitcoin will always be the first cryptocurrency, but it is not a mass-adoptable currency with any single, strong use case in its current form. Kin was designed with Bitcoin’s failings in mind.
The question comes up: Will Kin ever be a truly valuable coin, even with a ten trillion coin supply? The answer is an emphatic YES, it will. It will never be a short-term investment; there will be no 10x tomorrow, or 100x next week. But for the patient, the growth is coming. For the long term HODLer, the rewards will be significant indeed.
Let me explain why the Kin Foundation, in designing Kin, chose to make the circulating supply 10 trillion Kin tokens.
Why are there 10 Trillion Kin?
To be a true currency with mass adoption, used by millions of people, there needs to be a large amount of Kin available. Otherwise, in very short order, people would be using Kin in decimals. It was decided that people would rather earn and spend multiples of Kin (i.e., 1000 Kin or 500 Kin) versus decimals of Kin (i.e., 0.0001 Kin or 0.0005 Kin), as is now necessary with Bitcoin, Ethereum and many others. Note that Kin can also be used in decimal divisions, so that in the future, the value of Kin will never be limited by an inability to be used by the decimal.
In order to tamp down the extremely volatile nature of many cryptocurrencies, a larger circulating and available supply is necessary. A balance was found at 10T where the supply is large enough to meet the needs of the millions of users, but was small enough to not interfere with the growth of value in the coin. The Kin Rewards Engine (KRE) is key to this balance. By injecting Kin liquidity into the ecosystem, it rewards those who enable and grow the system, but it also minimizes volatility and keeps value growth down to a sustainable, non-hyperbolic/non-exponential growth curve. In this, it both creates opportunity and eases fears of volatility, for users, developers and merchants alike.
There are currently 756 billion Kin tokens in circulation; most of the remainder are held by the Kin Foundation for their own use, and for rewarding those who enable the ecosystem via the KRE. The KRE is schedule to begin operation in Q3 2018. As the value of Kin appreciates, the number of Kin injected via the KRE will change, though the total value will not. For this reason, the KRE stands to be in operation, injecting liquidity, rewarding innovation and ecosystem enhancement and controlling volatility for many, many years to come.
In the end, 10 trillion coins will not be enough to satisfy the long term needs and desires of the masses. If 50 million people are using Kin, this works out to only 200,000 Kin available per user. Most early adoptecapitalists in the ecosystem hold many, many more than that. This eventual scarcity will drive the value of Kin up significantly; I won’t prognosticate how high. There is, however, no limiting factor. I am very bullish at this prospect… because of the last item, number 5.
Metcalfe's Law shows the correlation between the usage of a telecommunications system, the size of it’s network, and its value. As the number of users grow, this law shows us that there is a direct correlation between the supply, the number of transactions per day, and the approximate value of that coin. This law follows closely the movement of Bitcoin, Ethereum and other cryptocurrency systems, and shows that Kin will benefit from mass adoption and millions of daily transactions from tens or hundreds of millions of users. Without a large supply, this would not be possible.
The design of Kin requires 10 Trillion coins to be available to execute the plan. And the plan is to allow users, developers and investors to all reap the benefits of a vibrant and growing ecosystem. When there are hundreds of millions of users in the ecosystem, the value of Kin will be greater than most people can imagine. It’s an exciting time, to be sure!
So we’ve looked at why the circulating supply is important, and why it’s different from other currencies. Let’s look at the center of why this works, the KRE.
The Kin Rewards Engine: How it will disrupt Social Media monetization
How often do you log onto YouTube, or Facebook, or any other Social Media site, and click on a video you’d like to see? Before the video starts, though, you are forced to watch an advertisement… maybe it’s something you want to know more about, but more often than not, it isn’t.
What if someone was reading your chat messages and saw you were talking about buying new running shoes, and there’s the ad for that, placed right in your face. Currently, the harvesting of your personal and private conversations is real and ongoing… putting that aside (and that’s a wholly different problem that Kin solves), someone is making money by scraping your personal data off of private communications and browsing histories, creating ads that target your interests, and then forcing you to watch those advertisements. A bot is reading your data, intuiting your thoughts, and someone profiting off of you.
George Orwell’s “1984” called this person “Big Brother.”
The KRE puts an end to this exploitative monetization model. The advertiser compensates you directly for viewing that advertisement, or answering that ad, or for playing that game. You can then spend your Kin on spend opportunities like branded Gift Cards from hundreds of big named merchants like Amazon, McDonalds, and Best Buy, or the user can take their Kin to an exchange and sell it for the fiat currency of their choice, US Dollars, Euros, GBP or Yen. You can use your Kin to buy music, to view curated content, or to tip a content provider. Paywalls for online journalism will become a thing of the past.
The KRE will reward the developer or person or company who placed the ad and contributed to the ecosystem. The user is allowed to contribute financially to content they value; instead of having their personal information sold to an advertiser. The user also can benefit financially for their own intellectual efforts and content creation.
Businesses and developers will be able to easily move their Kin to exchanges to trade for fiat currency; this enables them to pay bills and salaries, and reinvest in other parts of their business. This also creates liquidity for exchange trading, which is an important part of the Kin Ecosystem.
In this way, the KRE will rewards users, developers and investors who participate by adding value to the ecosystem. It will be an “open” ecosystem, allowing people to choose their use of Kin, whether it be purchases within apps, soft monetization via giftcards, or hard monetization via exchange trading for fiat currency. It may also become an option for game fans, hobby coders and enthusiasts to produce a living income via Kin.
Why are there two types of Kin?
Initially, Kin was designed to exist on a single blockchain infrastructure, the Ethereum Blockchain. Kin’s ICO was performed on the ETH Blockchain, and all Kin currently available to buy on exchanges are ERC20 tokens, built around Ethereum.
Last year, Ethereum experienced significant delays in transaction times because of a game that had been built on the platform, called “CryptoKitties.” This game became very popular very quickly with Crypto fans, and in their exuberance, their usage crashed the Ethereum platform.
The Kin Foundation realized that Ethereum, in its current form, was neither fast enough, nor robust enough to support the millions of users of Kin. Something had to be done.
The Foundation decided to seek another blockchain for Kin. Something faster, stronger, and secure enough for the millions of users of Kin to have near instantaneous, secure transactions, no matter what. A couple of solutions were found: The Stellar Lumens blockchain (XLM) was chosen because of it’s transaction speed, utility and robust nature, and the Orbs blockchain, which can stand as a replacement if there is a problem with Stellar down the road.
But what about exchanges? Kin on Ethereum can expect to be on many exchanges, and that access to liquidity that is essential to the success of the project. Kin on Lumens or on Orbs wouldn’t have widespread access to exchanges. This was a dilemma, The solution was to create the first ever two-blockchain cryptocurrency.
All Kin bought and sold on exchanges is on the Ethereum blockchain. Kin to be used in the KRE, the Kik app and the Kinit app, and in the remainder of the Kin Ecosystem, will be based on the Stellar Lumens blockchain. The two types of Kin will be functionally identical in value, and freely interchangeable between the two blockchains.
Basically, users will earn and spend Kin (XLM) in the Kin Ecosytem, due to Stellar’s robust design and fast transaction speed, but when they wish to move their Kin to an exchange, their Kin (XLM) will be exchanged for Kin (ETH) on a 1 for 1 basis prior to moving the Kin to the exchange of their choice for trading purposes.
In this way, the needs of all Kin users will be met. And should Stellar be someday unable to meet the demands of mass adoption, the Orbs Blockchain, and others, are available for later development. In any event, this dichotomy of Kin will be mostly transparent to the user, and will not impact the value or the utility of the currency.
The Kin Foundation has developed this dual-blockchain technology so that Kin can become the first mass-adopted, widely used cryptocurrency in the world.
So, how much will Kin be worth?
This is a big question. Many naysayers don’t believe Kin will appreciate significantly because of the large supply. This is based on their past experiences with Cryptos that don’t have utility and are simply speculative in nature. That’s not the case with Kin.
To be completely honest, no one knows how much appreciation Kin will experience, or when it will reach a certain value. Here’s what we do know:
Kin is positioned to be the first mass-adoption cryptocurrency in the world. Today, less than six million people worldwide own or use and cryptocurrency… this is an astonishingly low number. Kik, the messaging app behind Kin, has over 300 million registered users. Kin will be introduced first on the Kik app; Kik app users will have their first opportunities to earn and spend Kin before the end of 2018.
So basically, once Kin is introduced on the Kik app later this year, the number of people using cryptocurrency worldwide will multiply many times. In one day. Kik will introduce crypto to tens of millions of users by the end of the year.
As mentioned before, Metcalfe’s Law shows the relationship between a cryptocurrency value and the usage or transactions conducted by that coin, and the circulating supply. With current supply at 756 billion, and assuming transaction numbers in the 10 million per day range, Kin should be trading at around $0.01 per coin. Remember, however, that the KRE will be raising the circulating supply, and it may take some time to get to 10 million transactions per day. The value of Kin hinges on these numbers. In this, the beginning of the ecosystem, there is no foolproof way to estimate the value of Kin on any certain day.
That said, there is no limit to the value of the coin, over time. None. Not circulating supply, or market capitalization, or anything else. No limit. In a decade, after the ecosystem has matured and is operating solidly, Kin could be worth…. Well, you fill in your own numbers. I have my opinions, and they are not limited by the number of coins, the market cap or anything else designed into the coin. For me, it all hinges on mass adoption and usage.
Partnerships
Kin has inked a number of partnerships that are exciting and will stand the ecosystem well into the future. Two recently announced partnerships are UNITY and BLACKHAWK NETWORK.
UNITY
Unity is the ultimate game development platform. It brings together developers and technical assets in ways that allow the creation of some of the world’s most popular digital games. There were 5 billion downloads of games made with Unity in Q3 2016 alone. Today, games that were made with Unity exist on 2.5 billion unique mobile devices.
App and game developers will be able to insert Kin’s “5 minute SDK” (Software development kit) into the code of their app or game, and be monetizing their efforts with Kin in minutes. This “plug and play” approach makes the Kin Ecosystem and its rewards accessible to almost every developer, without the expense, time and research of developing a cryptocurrency. It truly is bringing cryptocurrency to the masses.
Simply plug the “5 minute SDK” into your code, launch/update it, and within minutes, you’re creating revenue. Your users will also have earn/spend opportunities, and your game/app usage will grow dramatically. No more sharing your revenue with the Apple App Store, or with Google Play Store. This is a huge increase in revenue for developers.
BLACKHAWK
Blackhawk Networks is the leading gift card supplier. Simply put, if you’ve ever used a gift card, it most probably came from Blackhawk Networks; that’s how deep their market goes. Over 250 different branded gift cards will be available for developers to choose from for their users to select, based on their personal knowledge of the demographic. Is your app a traffic or mapping app? Perhaps your users would appreciate being able to earn Kin to buy a Dunkin Donuts cash card. Because, coffee. Is your app a fitness app? Perhaps a Nike gift card is more appropriate. Is it a game geared towards younger users? There’s always McDonalds. A dating app? How about a card for flower delivery?
You can see that the options are endless. And don’t forget, the user AND the developer can choose to move their kin to other apps for other options, or to large cryptocurrency exchanges, where they can exchange their Kin for dollars, euros, etc.
In this way, the ecosystem is enhanced, the cycle begins again, and the KRE continues to reward.
Big Investors
One of the things that first got me excited about Kin was learning that Kik and Kin were heavily invested in by Tencent, the Chinese behemoth company behind WeChat. I travel extensively to China for my day job, and it was an incredible realization to see that most Chinese don’t carry paper currency anymore. Hundreds of millions of Chinese use WeChat every day to purchase everyday things like food, movies, clothing and the like. WeChat connects to the user’s bank account, and instantaneously debits the accounts when the user makes a purchase. Many retail outlets and vending machines in China no longer accept credit cards, and fiat purchases are dwindling in number.
Tencent’s interest in Kin is significant. Imagine Kik, using Kin, evolving into something similar… with hundreds of millions of people using Kin to conduct a significant amount of the economic transactions in their daily life! The adoption and utility numbers are mind boggling.
Additionally, there are a number of heavy hitters in the Crypto space investment community. Union Square Ventures (USV) is an investment fund that has bet heavily on Kik, and thereby, on Kin. Other investments from USV include CoinBase, Koko, DuckDuckGo, CodeAcademy, DuoLingo, Wattpad, SoundCloud, Foresquare, Kickstarter, Meetup, Etsy, Disqus, Tumblr, Twitter and Zynga. As you can see, Kin is extremely well positioned, and the monetization opportunity Kin represents for these companies is being explored.
Wrapping it all up in a big red bow…
The TL;DR version is this: Kin is poised to become the most used cryptocurrency in existence in 2018. As the KRE comes online, Kin is introduced to the Kik Community, the discrete Kin app (Kinit App) is released, the 5-minute SDK is finalized, more partnerships come online, more and major exchanges offer Kin trading, and word spreads, expect the value of Kin to begin growing significantly.
Kin currently sits near the bottom of the top 100 cryptocurrencies in terms of market capitalization, but the expectation is that Kin will rise towards the top of the top 100 in short order. As the value increases, so does market cap. Don’t make the mistake of thinking market capitalization limits the growth of Kin in any way; it will be the usage and mass adoption that will grow the value.
As the crypto market recovers from the last few months, look for Kin to accelerate its growth as more partnerships and exchanges are announced. Once the KRE begins operations, the value of Kin will grow more quickly. I do not expect Kin ever be worth less than it is right now.
The future for Kin is extremely bright. The Kin Foundation has much work left to do, but they are up to the task. Stay informed, and make sure your portfolio has Kin in it!
submitted by hiker2mtn to KinFoundation [link] [comments]

Trying to sell the highs / buy the lows is self-defeating if your goal is financial freedom (i.e. HODL, don't PANCI)

TLDR; If you're in crypto for financial freedom, don't try to time the market to potentially maximize your gains. Rather, follow a strategy which maximizes your chances of achieving life-changing gains.
Disclaimers If you don't want to read yet another random guy's musings about how to invest in crypto, please stop reading now. I'm not a financial advisor, and I'm primarily writing this post to collect my thoughts and check if it holds up to scrutiny. A lot of the numbers I'm using here are arbitrary, so I ask that you blur your eyes to understand the intent rather than the specifics.
I also make a lot of statements here without backing them up. Please, call BS if you disagree with any of my logic, assumptions, or uncited facts. If I was writing a book, I'd need to back up what I'm saying with actual evidence. I hope you can at least relate to some of the ideas that I present below. These are ideas that have been floating around in my head, but being able to articulate them helps me better frame my future investment decisions. Perhaps you implicitly follow a similar strategy and find value in surfacing it more clearly in your own mind.
Why you need a strategy This post started with a comment I made in a discussion about whether or not we're currently in a "bull trap."
If you HODL: Perhaps they’re right (about an impending crash) and you have to wait a few years to get rich. If they’re wrong, however, you don’t have to wait so long.
If you PANCI: (panic like a pansy) Perhaps they’re right and perhaps you also don’t miss your chance to buy back in, since at every little recovery it feels like a bad time to pull the trigger. If anything doesn’t go exactly as you expect, however, you forever lament coming within mere inches of true freedom.
Despite this reasoning, it's awfully tempting to assume that if you sell when the market feels like it's headed down, you'll buy in lower and end up with even bigger profits. If you didn't cash in a week ago, however, I bet that you're a conservative investor like me. I must often remind myself that conservative investors aren't great at consistently buying the dip, since the lowest prices occur when risk feels the highest. Only the most trigger-happy investors consistently buy the dip, but the downside is that they're also the most prone to fall for portfolio-wrecking fake-outs (bull & bear traps).
But shouldn't I try to beat the crowd? Is it possible to develop an edge and statistically beat the market, making even bigger gains than a buy-n-HODLer? Absolutely! Not only does this require a large ongoing time commitment, however, but these types of investors aren't focused on the goal of financial freedom. Rather, they're attempting to maximize their gains. Maybe they already have financial freedom and are trying to fund some other endeavor. Maybe they have other reasons.
What these traders aren't doing, however, is maximizing their chances of financial freedom sized gains. It sounds like a subtle distinction, but it's a world of difference. Would you rather have a 5% chance of winning $250,000,000, or a 50% chance of winning $25,000,000? Personally, I'd rather have the much higher odds of the smaller (but still huge) payout. I'm not saying these numbers reflect your odds with crypto, but they emphasize the strategy difference.
If you are truly focused on financial freedom, your decisions should be in line with that goal. An important part of this is not taking unnecessary risks by chasing the temptation of even bigger profits (what some might call "getting greedy"). If you believe that crypto has a significant shot of becoming a sizable chunk of the future economy, all you need is a little bit of luck and a disciplined approach so that you don't fuck it up.
To drive the point home, think about all those bitcoin millionaires who got in early. Do you think most of them got rich by trying to time the market, selling when it looked like it might go down? You've also probably read a few sob stories of people who got in early but lacked conviction and figured that a bird in the hand was worth two in the bush. They may have been happy at the time, but today they're kicking themselves wondering "what if." One actual bird might be worth two potential birds, but it's not necessarily worth a thousand of them.
A healthy mindset makes all the difference Staying the course requires deriving satisfaction from your successes without comparing your portfolio to those of the best/luckiest investors you read about. What you read online is an exceedingly biased sample. While you may hear about a few people who lost a lot of money day trading, that's just the tip of the iceberg. People generally brag about successes and are ashamed to admit failure.
It's liberating to acknowledge that there are always going to be people who make bigger gains than you will. If you're only happy when you achieve perfection, you will never be satisfied and will take unnecessary risks as you try to squeeze out every last ounce of potential profits. At first you'll probably be fine, but these risks add up, and odds are that you'll eventually stumble and be worse off than had you simply stayed the course. Trying to keep up with the Jones' is a path paved in misery, and in any case, the Jones' secretly have their own problems.
You only have to be "a little bit right" to succeed So how do you maximize your chances of life-changing gains? First, acknowledge that you aren't immune to external forces including market psychology. At times you will be over optimistic, and other times you'll be irrationally pessimistic. You have to step outside yourself ("go meta") to come up with a strategy and resolve to follow it.
At a high level, you must do enough research to form your own opinions. Then, guide your investments by trusting your opinions, but don't trust them too much. Structure your portfolio so that you only need to be "a little bit right" to achieve your goals.
Step 1: Determine how much to invest This is, at most, the same as how much you're willing to lose. This might make you roll your eyes, but if you're super conservative, push your boundaries a bit. What is the most money you ever put into a single stock? We're talking a whole new asset class here, so maybe multiply that amount 2-5 times. Just make sure that whatever amount you pick, you are truly prepared to lose all of it.
Don't consider a total loss to be an off-chance kind of event, either. Say to yourself that you easily could lose it all, but whatever you invest is your best shot at achieving financial freedom, so get comfortable in taking a calculated risk.
Step 2: Determine your top picks Diversification is key, so pick a handful of coins - perhaps 4-8. Don't go overboard because you won't be able to keep up with developments, but don't put too many eggs in one basket either.
How do you select your picks? There are no shortcuts - you need to do your homework. I'd budget a minimum of 16 hours upfront + a couple hours every month. Educate yourself on both the bullish and the bearish viewpoints. If you only read about the pros/cons as described by that coin's community, you'll probably fall for scams as well as misguided efforts whose developers understand the technical details without fully comprehending why bitcoin has been successful. Lots of people are smart in an area but aren't well-rounded enough to fully "get it."
Make sure that you actually understand why bitcoin was a game changer. I suggest watching a few of the top videos on YouTube from Andreas Antonopoulos, since he is unmatched when it comes to explaining the fundamentals. While you need to understand the main concepts, you don't need to actually know the inner workings of the cryptography itself - once again, just the key concepts.
When absorbing any content, put on your critical thinking cap. Don't accept anything as truth unless you understand why it must be the truth. Even Andreas has his own biases. Your goal is to build up an understanding from irrefutable truths, not to be reassured based on the opinions of others. This is hard and I don't know anyone who does it perfectly, but it is an important guiding principle.
I must caution you to be skeptical when lazy arguments are presented. Such arguments often point to some supposed genius(es) and imply that you should take their word at face value. Another deceptive strategy is when people point to some high-level technical paper (which the community has placed on a pedestal) and imply that you lack the intelligence to understand it if you still have any questions. Don't fall for the social trap of the emperor's new clothes. Ask your questions (be polite about it) and don't accept hand-wavey or "trust us" answers. How a community responds to tough questions provides you with solid insights.
Be aware that a lot of "me too" speculators are joining the party and are being lured by smooth talkers who claim to have the next bitcoin. There are some solid altcoins out there, for sure. However, there are also coins with large market caps that promise to be better than bitcoin in every way, while not being upfront about sacrificing one or more of the characteristics that has enabled bitcoin to thrive.
The value of these coins may continue to climb as speculators pile in, but ultimately if they cannot achieve decentralization w/ security, the bottom will fall out. Only invest in coins which you think have a long term future, since your foresight about crypto changing the world is your one true edge. If your BS meter is going off, but you can't shake the feeling that a coin could become dominant, invest no more than 1% of your portfolio into it and consider that money gone.
Step 3: Determine the price range you're going to attempt to ride This is where you get to codify your intuition.
First, think about how high a coin might rise if it actually realizes its full potential. If you believe in the value prop of crypto, you probably have a guilty little secret belief that some coin is going to be worth an astronomical amount. A million dollars a coin is crazy, but is it really? You may have trouble admitting this to yourself because you think of yourself as being pretty reasonable, whereas such beliefs sound like those of over-optimistic fools. Still, why wouldn't a dominant crypto currency have a 21 trillion dollar market cap if it achieves what it set out to do?
In reality, your belief probably is over-optimistic, but we'll attempt to factor that in shortly. Just don't totally discount the possibility that you were right all along. We very well may be at an inflection point in monetary history. Having foresight of this is where our best profit opportunities lurk.
Let's say that our guilty secret belief is that we think FOO has a 50% shot of hitting a million dollars. There are a lot of factors we haven't considered, so let's temper that by knocking off a whole decimal place. Even if there's only a 5% chance of that coin hitting a million dollars, it's still a chance worth taking if the price per coin is low enough. That is, our 50% guestimate probably doesn't reflect reality, but when it comes to FOO's chances of reaching $1M, we can be off by a whole order of magnitude (and still have a worthwhile investment) assuming we purchase that coin for under $50k (5% of $1M). That's our maximum buy-in price.
Most likely, FOO is far below $50k today, so if it's one of your 4-8 top picks, don't hesitate to buy it at the current market rate (see step 4). The further below $50k that it is today, the larger a percent of your portfolio you should consider allocating to it. If you want to wait to see if you can get a better deal on FOO, however, you've forgotten the investment strategy.
At this point, you should also calculate an adjusted optimistic price target for when to sell. The idea is to ride gains in FOO from its current levels all the way up to something close to your optimistic "what if" price level. In this example, we thought that FOO had a 50% chance of reaching $1M, so the adjusted optimistic price target would be $500k (50% of $1M). At that level, any remaining upside would be limited compared to the risk, so that's where you mostly cash out, perhaps letting 10-20% of the profits ride.
To recap, we've calculated price targets for FOO where we're willing to buy in at the current market rate so long as it's under $50k (it's likely much lower), and we will HODL until the price hits $500k.
I chose the numbers above to be nice and round. Some people really do think certain coins (e.g. bitcoin) have a high chance of reaching $1M. I personally wouldn't assume that any given altcoin has anywhere near that chance. Even my favorite altcoin I'd only give, say, a 15% chance of that happening, and I'd probably put bitcoin closer to 25%. You'll need to form your own opinions and adjust the math accordingly. Even if you think a coin has a 1% chance of hitting $1M, and we modify that to 0.1%, this strategy says you can buy it so long as it's under $1k.
Since I mentioned bitcoin, I'd suggest you consider BTC/BCH together as being a bitcoin, as it was before the August fork. If you try to pick a winner, you risk being wrong, so by default I'd consider these as a single logical coin, and buy the same amount of each. It's always good to educate yourself, but if you find yourself favoring one over the other (I won't get into my own beliefs, which have changed) consider weighting your investments, but not so heavily that you don't do well if the other one takes off. There's a lot of misinformation out there and it's easy to believe you see the truth if you've fallen for an orchestrated campaign. Don't take unnecessary risks - stay diversified!
Step 4: Plant seeds If the coins you've picked are currently below your maximum buy-in price, load up by investing the amount you'd predetermined, split amongst these coins. Pick a target allocation per coin (e.g. 15% of your portfolio) based on those you believe in the most, and also factor in their current price compared to your maximum buy-in price. The more space between these numbers, the more you'll make if the price ever hits your adjusted optimistic level (i.e. the moon). I wouldn't suggest putting more than 25% into any given coin.
Once again, don't try to time the market. The more you try to squeeze out a better deal, the more likely you are to miss the ride from today's super low valuation all the way up to your much, much higher target price. Every time you attempt to time the market, you take another risk which probably won't hurt you this time, but one of these days it will be catastrophic. If you already had a million dollars, would you take a 5% risk of losing it all if in the 95% case you won $25k? You might be tempted since you'll probably make money, but keep playing that game and you'll end up broke. Trying to time the market is similar.
Step 5: HODL tight, but have an exit strategy Remember you thought there was a 50% chance of FOO climbing to $1M? What if your extremely optimistic hunch was right?
Just hang tight, but not forever. It would royally suck to be right momentarily and then have the bottom fall out. You've already calculated your adjusted optimistic price target which is when you'd cash out 80% or more. The risk/reward profile doesn't make as much sense above this target level, but perhaps you weren't as overly-optimistic as you thought you were, so letting some of the profits continue to ride is a personal choice if you think there's more growth potential.
When I say “cash out,” I’m not necessarily referring to fiat. If crypto takes off, fiat may be in trouble. It’s too early to give much advice here, since your actions will need to be informed by the landscape at the time. One option may be precious metals. Maybe the best course will be to diversify into other cryptos. Maybe you’ll want a small amount of fiat. Or maybe the idea of cashing out will be moot. I realize this slightly contradicts the prior paragraph.
Along the journey, you may be tempted to cash out if the price begins to skyrocket (especially if it then stalls out), but this is when fortunes are made. More often than not it will correct several times. You'll be tempted to maximize your profits by timing these dips, but "obvious" corrections don't always materialize. Always stick to the strategy of maximizing your chances of big profits, and don't attempt to maximize the profits themselves.
It's okay, however, to take out a relatively small percentage of your profits on the ride up. There are whole articles about this, but there is a case to be made for taking out, say, 10% of profits every time the price doubles. Whatever you do, don't destroy your chances of making it big if you were right all along, but having some padding to place new bets and/or rebalance your portfolio isn't a bad thing in this rapidly changing environment, especially to take advantage of short-term spikes from unfounded hype. Either way, I suggest letting at least 2/3 of your profits ride until you reach your predetermined exit point.
Most importantly, don't PANCI (panic like a pansy). Some bit of news will periodically come along and make you think that your coin's chance of success has been reduced. You've probably already factored this in, however, since you had knocked a whole decimal place off your maximum buy-in price.
The internet is full of fake news, as well as news that doesn't end up mattering nearly as much as people claim it will. Let everyone else worry about what the current fair market value should be. It's mostly noise. Don't ignore it fully, but be confident that your strategy provides you with leeway so that you can reap the gains that only a contrarian can reap. These gains will be at the expense of less disciplined investors with weak hands. Yes, you will do the wrong thing more than once, but selling will reduce the number of shots you have to hit it big. You only need to be right once!
My advice to not fully ignore news may sound counter to HODL, but crypto is in such a rapidly changing environment that a head-in-the-sand approach is risky in its own way. It's healthy to periodically reassess your investments. If something fundamental truly has changed and invalidates your original reasoning for buying in, then don't HODL anymore. Don't be trigger happy, either, but do your research and make an informed choice. Most likely you will have doubts, in which case I suggest biasing yourself to keep HODLing. Those doubts are shared by the market and factored into the price. If they turn out to be false doubts, you'll ultimately make a killing by staying the course.
Believe in your original insights, but be open to being wrong. When unsure, stick with your prior plan. If super unsure (but not fully convinced to sell) reduce your position and rebalance into other coins. Reducing a position by 50% should be considered extreme.
Step 6: Dollar cost average (DCA) - optional There's a lot to be said for DCA, though I feel like it breaks down once your portfolio has already gone up by several factors. Investing a fixed amount every month is a worthwhile thing to do in the beginning, but at some point it begins to significantly increase your risk exposure while offering limited upside potential.
One suggestion is to have a fixed day where you invest a predetermined amount or fixed percent of your income, but only if that amount is over, say, 1% of the current value of your portfolio. If the amount would be too small, don't increase it - simply skip that month. If prices drop and are low enough on one of your future scheduled DCA days, invest your predetermined amount + any amount you'd previously skipped. That day may never come, but in that case you didn't miss out on a ton of upside anyway. Pat yourself on the back for managing your risk exposure.
Conclusion This post has certainly grown way past my intended couple of paragraphs. I hope some of you found it interesting. If you did, or if you have anything to add or challenge, please add your comments.
submitted by TroyStackhouse to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Blockchain & mining - my attempt to explain it

There are so many people invested in crypto now, but there are still quite a lot of people who don’t actually know what a “Blockchain” really is, nor do they truly understand its usefulness.
 
People hear these phrases like “digital ledger secured using cryptography” and think it sounds cool, but what exactly does that mean?
 
There are literally tons of informational resources on the net, but most of them fly straight over the heads of the average Joe. I thought it would be worth breaking down the concept of “Blockchain” to make it easy for anyone to understand.
 
So first and foremost, what is a “block” in a Blockchain? Well a block is a bunch of transactions grouped together. When I say “transactions”, I am referring to a ledger or list of transactional information.
 
Let me offer an example of a “transaction”:
 
Joe has $1000
Joe’s bank account is 1234-5678 @ HSBC
Joe sends Sarah $200
Sarah has $2000
Sarah’s bank account is 8765-4321 @ Bank of China
The time of the transaction is 12:47pm 20th Feb 2018
Joe’s account will now be $800
Sarah’s bank account is $2200
 
This is a simple example, but fundamentally this short list of information pertaining to a single transaction. This transferral of money ($200 from one person to another) is added to a “block” alongside a whole bunch of other transactions from other people.
 
Let’s use Bitcoin for the remaining examples. Each “block” on the bitcoin blockchain is 1mb in length. So what exactly is 1mb? Well 1mb or “mega-byte”, represents one million bytes of information. Now one “byte” of information represents a single ascii character. Every single character I am typing right now represents one byte. So “Hello” (without the quotations) represents 5 bytes of information.
 
So if we go back to my example transaction above, the number of bytes that this transaction took up is 246 bytes. This is just a fraction of 1mb, so you can see a lot of transactions of this size could be stored in a 1mb block.
 
OK so hopefully you understand what a “block” at least represents. So the next question would be, how do you ensure this “block” of information has not been tampered with? After all, it would be utterly disastrous if someone were to access a block of information and change some of the information. Imagine changing the destination bank address, or the amounts involved!
 
In order to secure a “block” we use cryptography. Specifically we use something called a “hash”. A hash essentially takes a bunch of data, applies a fixed set of mathematical operations to the data, and the eventual output is a “hash” of the data.
 
Let me give you an example of an ultra-basic “hash algorithm” -
 
Step 1. Take a number and double it
Step 2. Add 6
Step 3. Divide it by 2
 
That’s it…. A basic hash algorithm!
 
Let’s take a couple of numbers and apply the hash algorithm to the numbers.
 
First we’ll start with 20
 
Step 1. 20 x 2 = 40
Step 2. 40 + 6 = 46
Step 3. 46 / 2 = 23
 
So in this example, the “hash” of the original number (20) is 23
 
Let’s apply it to another number….This time 22
 
Step 1. 22 x 2 = 44 Step 2. 44 + 6 = 50 Step 3. 50 / 2 = 25
 
So the “hash” of the original number (22) is now 25
 
Now any different number you try as your input will always produce a different number as your hashed output. However, if you apply my hashing algorithm to the number 20, the “hash” will always be 23, and if you apply it to the number 22, the “hash” will always be 25.
 
If we take the numbers I used in the above examples (20 & 22) as “inputs”, then the “output” (the hash) will always produce the same result, but any changes to the input will always affect the output.
 
Ok so that’s applying a hash to a number…..what about text? How do we “hash” a string of text?
 
Well that’s where something called the “Ascii Table” comes in. The Ascii Table offers a unique code for every alphanumeric character. This allows us to convert a string of text into a number. Let’s take the word “Hello” (without the quotes) and convert it to a number using the Ascii table.
 
Ascii Table : https://www.cs.cmu.edu/~pattis/15-1XX/common/handouts/ascii.html
 
Capital H is represented as 72
Lower case e is represented as 101
Lower case l is represented as 108
Lower case l is represented as 108
Lower case o is represented as 111
 
If we concatenate these numbers we’d get 72101108108101
 
So we have a number…..lets apply my basic hashing algorithm to this number
 
Step 1. 72101108108101 x 2 = 144202216216202
Step 2. 144202216216202 + 6 = 144202216216208
Step 3. 144202216216208 / 2 = 72101108108104
 
So in this example, the “hash” of the word Hello is 72101108108104
 
If I changed any letter, the hash would be different. If I even changed the Captial H to a lower case h, the hash would be different. If anything at all changes the hash would be different.
 
So hopefully you understand the concept of hashing….. Now I should state that my example hashing algorithm is painfully simple. If would be trivial to reverse engineer this, simply by reversing the steps. However this is my example hash.
 
Let’s compare this to the SHA256 hash.
 
The SHA256 “hash” of the word “welcome” (without the quotes) is 280D44AB1E9F79B5CCE2DD4F58F5FE91F0FBACDAC9F7447DFFC318CEB79F2D02
 
If you apply the SHA256 hash algorithm to the word welcome, the hash will ALWAYS be 280D44AB1E9F79B5CCE2DD4F58F5FE91F0FBACDAC9F7447DFFC318CEB79F2D02
 
Try it yourself on a few different online SHA256 calculators:
 
http://www.xorbin.com/tools/sha256-hash-calculator
https://passwordsgenerator.net/sha256-hash-generato
http://www.md5calc.com/
 
So we know that if we apply the SHA256 hashing algorithm to the word welcome, we will of course always get the same result, because the steps involved in “hashing” data using SHA256 algorithm are publicly documented, albiet very complex.
 
However, the steps are far from the simple 3-step process I gave in my example…..Sha256 uses 64 steps, and none of them are as basic as the 3-step example I included of using plus, minus, multiply and divide.
 
I won’t go into the entire 64-step process (There are plenty of resources out there if you are interested) but just to give you an idea of the complexity of the hashing algorithm, I’ll go through the first few steps. But before we do this, we need to “prepare” the input.
 
To do this we first split the word into 4-byte chunks starting from the first character. The word "welcome" (without the quotes) contains 7 characters, so it is split into two chunks
 
Chunk A – welc
Chunk B - ome
 
Ok, now for each chunk, we convert this to ascii
 
Chunk A – welc = 119 101 108 99
Chunk B – ome = 111 109 101
 
Now we convert these values to a HEX value (for information on hex, take a look here : http://whatis.techtarget.com/definition/hexadecimal)
 
Chunk A – 119 101 108 99 = 77 65 6c 63
Chunk B – 111 109 101 = 6f 6d 65
 
Now any Chunk that is not a complete 4-bytes, needs to be “padded” to make it a complete 4-byte chunk. This padding always represents “80” in hex
 
Chunk A is fine….it's 4-bytes, so does not require any padding. Chunk B is only 3 bytes, so it needs an extra byte of padding. To do this we simply append hex 80 to the end.
 
So Chunk B becomes 6f 6d 65 80
 
The two binary values are now concatenated back together and padded out to create a 56 byte data string. They are padded out with zeros. Hex characters are represented with two characters, so 0 in hex is 00
 
So the two strings go together and lots of hex value zeros go on the end to make 56 bytes
 
77 65 6C 63 6F 6D 65 80 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
 
We now calculate the length of the actual message in bytes including the padding (77 65 6C 63 6F 6D 65 80) and this is a total of 8 bytes, so this value of 8 (The number 8 is represented as 38 in hex) is appended to the very end of the 56 bytes to create a complete 64-byte string.
 
So the total 64-byte string has become:
 
77 65 6C 63 6F 6D 65 80 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 38
 
The 64 byte string is then converted to binary….
 
01110111 01100101 01101100 01100011 01101111 01101101 01100101 10000000
00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000
00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000
00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000
00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000
00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000
00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000
00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00111000
 
In the data section (the first 56 bytes) the first byte of data (01110111 in binary) represents 77 in hex, which in turn represents the decimal value of 119, which is the ascii value of w
 
The second byte of data (01100101 in binary) represents 65 in hex, which in turn represents the decimal value of 101, which is the ascii value of e
 
In the final section, the very last byte of data (00111000 in binary) represents 38 in hex, which in turn represents the decimal value of 56, which is the ascii value of 8, which represents the length of the padded data string. This value will always be a multiple of 4.
 
Ok so now we’ve got that 64-byte data stream, we now apply some other things to it.
 
At this point Sha256 does some "shifting" of the data.
 
"Shifting" is when you move data around – So for example if we “shift” every square on the grid backwards 7 places, then this is what would happen.
 
10000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000
00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000
00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000
00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000
00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000
00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000
00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000
00111000 01110111 01100101 01101100 01100011 01101111 01101101 01100101
 
Ok so Sha256 does a few more rounds of shifting until eventually, the data has been moved around and looks completely different on the grid to what it started with.
 
After all this is done, only then is the data “prepared” and ready to be manipulated through the 64 steps to create the hash! Now on the face of things at first glance, this actually looks complicated, but for a computer to hash data using Sha256, it’s actually fairly simple. It can do it extremely quickly! A human being could in fact do the complete SHA256 hash with enough patience. Somewhere actually did this with a pen and paper and it took them a little over a day.
 
After the 64 rounds of adjustment, the final hashed value of welcome comes to 280D44AB1E9F79B5CCE2DD4F58F5FE91F0FBACDAC9F7447DFFC318CEB79F2D02 and providing that you used sha256 to hash it, the word welcome will always hash to this value. If I change the anything in the input, the output hash changes dramatically.
 
For example, if I change welcome to Welcome (capital W), the Sha256 hash becomes 0E2226B5235F0FF94A276EB4D07A3BFEA74B7E3B8B85E9EFCA6C18430F041BF8 As you can see it’s totally unrecognisable compared to the previous hash.
 
So hopefully now you have an understanding of hashing, you can see that the data stored in a block can be hashed, and it will generate a hash value.
 
Copy the following section of transaction text into any online SHA256 calculator:
 
Joe has $1000
Joe’s bank account is 1234-5678 @ HSBC
Joe sends Sarah $200
Sarah has $2000
Sarah’s bank account is 8765-4321 @ Bank of China
The time of the transaction is 12:47pm 20th Feb 2018
Joe’s account will now be $800
Sarah’s bank account is $2200
 
You should get the following hash value:
 
F4162A24257D3D2995E80B8FB08F43A9F029CC951F8C103051EAD30BFCDCC63F
 
Now this is just one transaction, but the point is that you will never see that same hash value again, unless the EXACT same transaction information is hashed with SHA256. If you change anything at all, the hash value will change completely.
 
Now I won’t go into why this is virtually impossible to reverse engineer, but suffice to say the estimates of computing power required to reverse a SHA256 hash are as follows:
 
Based on current computing power, brute-forcing SHA256 would take a powerful modern PC approximately 71,430,540,814,238,958,387,154 years. Some scientists believe the sun will “extinguish” in about 5,000,000,000 years.
 
For now, SHA256 is pretty secure!
 
So if we have a “hashed block”, suffice to say it is pretty much impossible to break.
 
So there we have it...a block!
 
OK so what does the word “chain” in blockchain mean?
 
Simple….. you take the hash value of the first block, and stick it into the very next block as the first part of data, just before you start adding your new transactions. Can you see what effect this has?
 
If my first block hash is:
 
F4162A24257D3D2995E80B8FB08F43A9F029CC951F8C103051EAD30BFCDCC63F
 
If I put this just in front of all my new transactional data, then the total data in the new block (including the hash of the previous block) all gets hashed as one to create a new hash for the second block. If anyone tampers with the first block, the hash changes, and therefore won’t match with the hash put into the second block. This has a knock-on effect to all subsequent blocks.
 
So if you have a block-chain full of nodes (servers) and node A is reporting a cumulative hash of all blocks on the latest block on the chain to be XXXXXX but node B, node C, and node D are reporting the cumulative hash for all blocks to be YYYYYYYY, then it’s immediately obvious that node A has been compromised, and needs to be removed….after all, the entire block chain of entries ultimately ends up with an up-to-date hash of all the previous blocks, and if anything changes…..literally one single character in any single block changes…..then hash proves that the chain has been compromised!
 
So what exactly is mining? Mining is simply re-running the hash over and over and over again onto a block, until you reach a constant…..What I mean by a constant is as follows:
 
  1. You take your block of data
  2. You hash it to get a hash value
  3. You check to see if the hash begins with four zeros 0000
  4. If it doesn’t you now add 1 to the data and re-hash
  5. You check to see if the hash begins with four zeros 0000
  6. If it doesn’t you now increment the number by one and re-hash
 
You now repeat steps 5 & 6 over and over and over again, until eventually, at some point, you will see 4 zeros.
 
This extra value you are adding is what is known as a “nonce” and is actually short for the word nonsense! It basically means that you are adding a number that increments in the block, whilst everything else in the block remains constant.
 
Let’s take a simple transaction to use as an example:
 
Fred has $200
Claire has $300
Joe sends Claire $50
Fred now has $150
Claire now has $350
 
Ok nice and simple….. Let’s use a great website resource to demonstrate mining this data.
 
Copy this basic transaction into the “data” section of this web page and delete any visible “nonce” value (if there is one there) - https://anders.com/blockchain/block.html
 
(NOTE: when you copy/paste from reddit it might also copy the spaces between the lines, so you would need to remove them, as a space is also a valid ascii character.)
 
If done correctly, you should see a hash value at the bottom of f710ba16e8b987575a23ce0fe13a4dfbd3e72676c65890a7b8acab421748195b
 
Now this doesn’t begin with 0000, so now let’s click on the "mine" button, and the page will keep incrementing the nonce value until eventually the hash will begin with 0000.
 
The process should take around 5-10 seconds, and eventually the hash will be displayed as 00009db80aa366297984130a3f2b74b4f3a6eb044df24de700a616ca9e6aacb6
 
This does begin with 0000 and it took 15,708 “hashes” to reach it. You have reached a constant!
 
This block would now be deemed as a valid block, and the hash of this block is what is passed onto the next block! This is basically mining!
Mining is necessary to ensure that all blocks on the block chain are valid and accurate. Obvioulsy doing this requires computational power, which requires equipment (computers) and energy (electricity) which must be paid for, hence the reason that "miners" are compensated with coins for their efforts.
 
So hopefully you now have a better understanding of block chains and mining :-)
submitted by jpowell79 to u/jpowell79 [link] [comments]

CampBX Fees?

I have been buying bitcoins from CampBX. I multiple my order by the 0.55% to get an estimate of what the fees would be, but when the order is filled by several different amounts, it is a bit hard to actually figure out. I take the highest price and just that for all the coins to get an idea of the total. Then I started saving a copy of my balance, making the order, and then subtracting my new balance from the original. For the second time, the value I got was several dollars off from what I calculated.
I checked my history to see what happened, and it shows my order of 2 btc being filled in 3 subtransactions. In each one, it shows the fee. If I multiple out the number of coins bought at the 3 different price levels, and then add in each fee amount, it comes out really close to what I calculated, $180.62. When I subtract my initial balance from my current balance, the transaction cost me $184.27.
There a difference of $3.65 that I can't figure out what happened to it. I contacted CampBX, but they said "We are unable to reproduce your issue on our end. Can you please try again and let us know if you still see any discrepancy?"
Is there a better way to determine fees other than multiplying the order by the 0.55%? CampBX also said that the numbers are rounded for display purposes, but I don't see how $3.65 could be lost due to rounding errors for this transaction alone. There have been times where the total fees calculated were several decimals places and it seems like the fees were rounded down to the nearest 2 decimals.
The only thing I can think of is each time that happens, it gets carried over and eventually there's a transaction where all the little amounts that were rounded down get added together, and that's where the $3.65 went.
submitted by wasabi12 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

The Rules for Rounding Off Decimals When Multiplying and ... Placing Decimals with Multiplication MULTIPLYING DECIMALS WITH FACTORS UP TO 2 DECIMAL PLACES ... Multiplying a Decimal By a Whole Number (Using Place Value ... Comparing Decimals - With Place Value Disks

Bitcoin can be divided down to eight decimal places, and those tiny fractions of bitcoin are known by some as satoshis (1 satoshi = 0.00000001 BTC). Since bitcoin exists as computer code it is easily divisible. Because it is a digital currency, bitcoin is pretty much like email for money. The same way anyone can create an email address to send ... Posted on: 21 April 2015 , by: Pepperstone Support , category: About Trading Pepperstone quotes currency pairs by "5, 3 and 2" decimal places also known as fractional pips or pipettes. On a 5 decimal place currency pair a pip is 0.00010 On a 3 decimal place currency pair a pip is 0.010 On a 2 decimal place currency pair a pip is 0.10 For example: If GBP/USD moves from 1.51542 to 1.51552, that ... PayPal is bringing Bitcoin to the masses and more and more companies and mutual funds have started the hodln. There will never be more than 21 million BTC. At the time, Satoshi Nakamoto calculated… Most currencies allow for 2 decimal places for common use because they are strongly regulated by their issuing government. Some provide 3dp, others, like the Yen provide none (integer only). It should be noted that stock exchanges offer shares priced down to 4dp but given the surrounding fees it is not economical to purchase a single share at that price so is used mainly as a multiplying ... Currently, 1 bitcoin can only be broken down into 100,000,000 smaller units, known as satoshis. However, that limit is not set in stone. If, at some point, more than 2,100,000,000,000,000, or 2.1 quadrillion, units of currency are needed, then it would not be difficult to allow the currency to be broken down to another decimal point or two.”

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The Rules for Rounding Off Decimals When Multiplying and ...

This video is just a quick review showing how to multiply decimals using the standard algorithm. Review where to place your decimal in you answer after multiplying. How multiplication changes when you multiply with decimals. Bitcoin is very divisible... up to 8 decimal places! What this short explainer video and learn more about Bitcoin. This video was sponsored by Swiss Bank In Your Pocket which is an offline wallet ... In this video, I will build on what has already been taught in the videos called 'Multiplying by Powers of 10' AND 'Multiplying Decimals PART 1'. In this vid... To compare two decimals, model each number on a decimal place value chart. To ind which number is greater, start by comparing the digit in the greatest place value. When digits are the same ...

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